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1

No because the browser dont change anything in the request when sending it over https (It will only encrypt it additionally). An attack with e.g. XSS will work exactly like it would work with http. https only prevents from another type of attacks like man in the middle reading the session.


0

CSRF for login generally yes but does depend on your application. an attacker can log you into a malicious account eg in Google and then monitor all your site visits. CSRF for logout - yes absolutely can prevent DOS


3

No, you don't need CSRF token Csrf token is used to certify a request is approved by a user. If there is no gain between sending this request by your own and sending this request being another user on the network, Csrf is useless. If you are not sure to understand what Csrf token is, feel free to ask in the comments and I will edit my answer to clarify it.


2

I believe you're mixing up a few different threats and attack vectors here. Threat: MITM sniffing or setting tokens Location: Public wifi How to mitigate: Use HTTPS so the connection is secured over TLS/SSL. Also the cookie Secure Flag is recommended, and an HSTS policy with preload. Threat: XSS Location: Over the internet What it is: An attacker ...


0

As this feels as a school-assignment, I would recommend buying one or two of the "basic" web security books which often discusses all of the most popular vulnerabilities. This will make you understand the vulnerabilities better and therefore you can explain them in any way you feel like in the paper. As for the interview part the google form idea ...


1

Well It's not about OWASP Top 10 / Top 20 / Top n, those can be changed over time (xss is more present right now then it was back in 90'), what actually matters at OWASP is there update to the technology methodologies (v.1 v.2 .. v.4) that offer an exhaustive testing plan of a Web based application. If you want to simplify them ... you should take in account ...


1

It is important to notice that CORS is not around to solve all security issues but rather a specific one which is being able to read data from a third party resource (I am on google.com but I try to read facebook.com cookies). Take a look here: The Cross-Origin Resource Sharing standard works by adding new HTTP headers that allow servers to describe the ...


1

When implementing CSRF protection, one generally uses a CSRF cookie that must be included in the body of the request. This prevents CSRF attacks because the malicious website cannot read the other website's cookies. This is fundamentally incorrect. I think you misunderstand the attack vector. A CSRF attack (also called "session riding") will typically ...



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