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1

For HDDs, you generally need to overwrite the data several times (with either random data or specific patterns) to completely destroy traces of old data. Otherwise it can be recovered by using advanced data forensic methods. For secure destruction of information stored on the HDDs, the U.S. DoD Unclassified Computer Hard Drive Disposition specifies three ...


2

We have a whole bunch of questions on the difficulty of wiping data from SSD's. You should have a good browse round this site. Simple answer is: By default, SSD's leave more data on the drive. This is because of wear leveling - overwriting doesn't exist as a concept in the same way as on a physical platter. That said, there are known solutions, the most ...


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The reason DBAN or such erasure software, wont beat the investigators, is that when they find out a drive is erased (zero:ed), this will count as destruction of evidence, which is punishable. Thus, its enough that the investigators prove that the drive has been intentionally erased. It depends on country, but in most countries that employ the "forbidden ...



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