New answers tagged

1

Disks do not always map a logical address to the same physical location, especially SSDs. When a remap has happened, the physical location with data may not even be accessible to user programs like DBAN. Specialised make/model-specific tool will be required and they most often can only do full wipes. So the only real safe solution is to clone the recovery ...


0

If you have access to a Mac running OSX you can simply attach the drive, possibly via USB, and run Apple's Disk Utility tool, select the partition you wish to securely erase, then click on the Erase Tab, then click on the Security Options button and move the slider to the level of secure erasing you would like just for that partition. The most secure ...


1

TL;DR; It depends how you moved it. If you have never moved the files to Hard Drive B, it won't carry over the traces. The way the files are stored on a hard drive would leave traces of the file on Hard Drive A (gets overwritten over a period of time). The difference is that when you copy files from one hard drive to another, it only copies the files you ...


4

It depends on how you copy them. If you do a bitwise copy, aka exactly replicating every single bit from one disk to the other, you are copying over "slack space" which is where the recovery tool will work. If you do a file copy, then the empty space of the disk is ignored, and only the segments of data attached to a file header will copy over. The ...


2

Most encryption software like bitlocker or Truecrypt will offer you to overwrite the space that's left with random bytes, resulting in the file being deleted. Another option is using a fileshredder. Look for any shredder using the Gutmann method



Top 50 recent answers are included