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2

Ping of Death, Teardrop etc. were local attacks for broken TCP/IP stack implementations and caused affected systems to crash (mostly in late 90-ties). Smurf in an example of distributed (DDoS) attack, which uses ICMP Echo Request with spoofed address to cause victim systems to be flooded by ICMP Echo Reply packets. TCP SYN flood is an attack to overflow ...


-3

Try making a site delay. When anyone attempts to access the site, make it so there is a 5 second delay. Real users won't be bothered by this, but it will reduce denial-of-service attacks significantly.


0

I would consider it to be both operational(or biz) as well as a security risk. Biz: Businesses run on reputation and if the reputation goes for a toss as a result of a DDOS attack; if the C-level executives fails in the damage control area. The situation is especially grave when you are running a B2B service. Security: Crackers can use the DDOS attacks ...


1

From a technical, 1s and 0s stand point, he is correct but the "accepted scope" of security threats include availability. However all companies are free to assign responsibilities as they see fit so your CSO may be simply stating a point that it's not his responsibility to mitigate that particular risk.


17

While I generally disagree with the CSO, I can see a reason why he drew this line. The question can come down to the delineation of who needs to lead mitigation and remediation efforts. DDoS does, of course, impact availability but is typically handled by the Operations team. If a DDoS event happens, your CSO might feel that there is nothing that he can do ...


2

DDoS attacks fall into both operational and security categories because of the triad mentioned above. However security personnel tend to be more knowledgeable of attacks so like AviD said there should be communication between the security and IT teams to solve the problem rather than losing hours covering research that could be solved by a 10 minute phone ...


38

I think that is a false dichotomy, and your CSO is being plain silly. Though I am fond of the silliness, the security department should be driving risk mitigation. Squabbling over areas of "responsibility" are obviously not productive, though it might fit into the general corporate culture. While there are various ways of qualifying the realm of ...


1

I suggest the following: Centralized Antivirus/Malware Management (Endpoint Security) Some sort of physical appliance for threat management-like a Dell Sonicwall. Enable Syn Flood protection at the very least. Utilize this appliance for secured VPN access. Enable net flow to gather view of Internet traffic on LAN. Audit all systems on network if possible, ...


3

As you mention, you should definitely setup "split tunnel" VPN, wherein traffic only traverses the VPN when it needs to -- other traffic goes over the internet. That is likely the simplest solution to your issue. However, the caveat is that these infected computers can still be used as a hop-off point to access resources on your VPN; so you can have a ...


2

Android devices are vulnerable to DDOS attacks. The Android Operating system does not contain any special protection against DDOS attacks. (However, DDOS attacks are typically aimed at web servers with the intent of preventing legit users from accessing them and Android OS is not used as a web server, so you are unlikely to find a DDOS against it) In ...



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