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1

Reporting the IP addresses will yield little, moreover, nothing. In many cases, the addresses DoS'ing you are likely compromised or infected with malware. Your goal should be to focus your time, resources on minimizing, or getting rid of the capabilities of being DoS'd, this is time better spent. The question becomes, how do you stop/minimize DoS attacks. ...


0

It looks like some kind of negative SEO technique, but I don't think it has been proven that it can really impact your ranking. See: 301 Redirect for negative SEO. This is a problem PROBLEMS WITH REDIRECT CHAINS Thousands of 301 redirects bad for SEO?


0

Like most answers relating to questions of this type, it depends. IP spoofing can make it very difficult to trace you, but it is not a guarantee someone won't be able to. It really depends where on the network the person who might want to trace you is. For example, if you did this from your ISP account or your company network and the administrators of ...


0

Hackers can be caught, Anonymous cannot. Anonymous is such a lose collective that it is not materially hurt by law enforcement striking out at its individual hackers. However, it does respond violently against any organization that attempts to do so. This means Its very hard to strike down Anonymous just by catching its members. Anonymous will make life ...


2

When you do the DDOS, you will be sending a flood of information. If you fully own the server, and you are sending it from your own server, then the 'send' and 'receive' points will be fine. But you still have to account for all the other machines inbetween. If this is fully an internal network you own, then there shouldn't be a problem. But even if ...


11

The source IP address tells the client who to respond to, but it isn't the only way to tell where the traffic came from. You still have to communicate with a router at your ISP and they are going to talk to another router and possibly log the traffic. They may also flat out refuse to handle a packet with a forged sender from within their network. Just ...


10

If the server's on your own network, feel free. But if it's hosted somewhere, then your DDOS could impact other people using the same network path or other infrastructure. You could ask permission, but they'll almost certainly say no - SPs are generally comfortable with pentesting but nobody fools around with DDOS testing.


31

You are correct that this is possible. There are problems with the plan though: The network you are leaving can filter to drop outgoing packets that do not have a source IP from within their network. DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) is based around idea that many boxes target a single one, overloading the target's ability to handle the data. Your ...


2

I will answer the question in a generic way, as well as the question was asked. If is the railway local web site that is being attacked and not you, you can not do anything to avoid this. No matter the speed of your internet or if you are using a VPN. To be clear, I am not considering a lot of factors here, because the question does not permits me.


3

Assuming you're just throwing data at a closed port, your friend will notice a substantial slowdown in his Internet connectivity and an increase in packet loss, but it will not result in an inability to use the Internet. Think of his connection as a pipe: you're trying to throw 4Mbps down a 4Mbps pipe, and he's trying to pull additional data down. ...


0

I'm not sure if this was what you were getting at with Automated Mitigation mentioned by @theterribletrivium, but they also use load balancers to distribute traffic evenly to separate servers in order for them to run as fast as possible. Although it's not the most effective way to evenly distribute users to servers, Google uses what is called Round-robin ...


3

My company has dealt with DDoS attacks up to 180gbps and here are my techniques that I have used to mitigate. The size of a website doesn't only make it a bigger target, things that also play a significant role are: Public relations (Are you marketing yourself as something you are not, what people are you targeting) Delivering on promises Treating ...


5

As a mid-sized company, we use a DOS mitigation service to reduce the risk of our website from being knocked offline. Our site resolves to the provider's IP address. The provider then forwards the request to our webserver. Our webserver only communicate with the provider. They then use their tools to determine if certain attacks are actual attacks by using ...


41

They generally have a very layered approach. Here are some things I've either implemented or seen implemented at large organizations. To your specific question on smaller businesses you generally would find a 3rd party provider to protect you. Depending on your use case this may be a cloud provider, a CDN, a BGP routed solution, or a DNS-based solution. ...


8

While there are no real counter measures for DDOS, there are someways to control it. First is by using a Content Delivery Network, Using several data centers across the world to serve contents to visitors from different geographical areas. This helps to eliminate single point of failure and makes it harder to exhaust resources or saturate the links and ...



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