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0

Backups don't really have anything to do with preventing or mitigating DDOS attacks. A DDOS attack will prevent people from accessing your site, it doesn't have anything to do with the destruction of data. So to answer your question, no - I don't think setting up backups will help you in the event of a DDOS attack. That said, regularly backing up data ...


4

That first IP at least is owned by a Russian telecom: Address lookup canonical name broadband-46-18-200-212.clients.kubtel.ru. aliases addresses 46.18.200.212 Queried whois.ripn.net with "kubtel.ru"... domain: KUBTEL.RU And considering that many IP addresses are being checked for ICMP in less than 3 seconds, I would say that ...


0

There have been several resource exhaustion attacks over the years that simply fill up all available connections and idle until timeout. This stops the server from accepting any new connections until the attack stops. Probably the most famous of these tools is the slow loris attack which expands on the old method by sending low amounts of data at a very slow ...


-1

I'm not a malware expert, but I know that blackhats tends to use a small spoofing technique by calling their malware a name that is used by the system, in order to not raise the user's attention. Also, all anti-viruses can be bypassed by performing different encoding methods that makes the malware undetectable. But of course, Anti-viruses companies are doing ...


0

A potential solution could be to rely on intermediary servers and don't allow P2P communication for untrusted clients. Let's say it's a chat program (like Skype), the client at the same time becomes an intermediary server on the network and is able to relay data between other clients. For someone to contact you, he first must look up the IP of the ...


2

as @GZBK said, this happens because for whatever reason, people are being sent to your server when they try to open those sites. This has happened to many others, and is likely the GFW doing its dirty thing. Here is a nice post about some other guy who had the same thing happen to him. You can use this site to check if the dns is pointed to your server.


3

Since GZBK covered why, I will cover the single simple solution to minimize this and related problems that I and others such as StevenC use. Make your first or default virtual host small fast and light, returning errors on all requests (I have been known to allow a basic css and related resources). This has the advantage of minimizing resource consumption, ...


10

When you type the URL in your browser, the browser will mainly do two things with it: Resolve the host name to get the associated IP address to be contacted, this allow the browser to send the request to the right server, Put the host name which has been actually typed in the Host HTTP header, this allows the server to send an appropriate reply in case ...


0

A DDoS attacks basically means the connection to your computer is saturated. There are several ways to do this but the result is the same: nobody can access your router and you may possibly not be able to go on Internet (roughly speaking). No hacking is involved, once the DDoS stops you recover (you many need to reboot your router). So this is not "hacking" ...


1

I would say that DoS attacks are significantly more common, I should also point out that a packet flood is not the only form of DoS / DDoS attack. For example, I know of a fairly popular php product ( a Video encoding / gallery product, not going to name names since this is still undisclosed) which even in its current revision can be massaged correctly ...


0

No. A DDoS attack would be generating thousands of log entries per second, not three entries over the course of 20 minutes. Like usual, your router is simply presenting minor events in the most alarming language possible to scare you into thinking it's doing something.


1

Based on the timestamps (1min 46sec & ~15min gaps between events), this is not a DDoS. This is about par for random DoS attempts against an exposed device on the Internet, such as your Netgear router. A DDoS would show many events flooding in at the same time... you would get lots of logged events per second, or at the very least hundreds per minute.



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