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77

Imagine a post office. It has an entrance, a counter with a clerk who deals with the customers and their packets. The clerk is a multi-tasking talent with a lot of arms to deal with packets on the counter. The counter has a certain width, so only a certain number of customers can be processed at the same time. The clerk has a small address book with ...


5

First you have to be clear that there are different kinds of denial of service attacks. Some of them don't require a lot of resources, they use vulnerabilities in software to block the server client communication. Brute-force DOS attacks are most of the time DDOS attacks. To answer your question: No, it's not only the bandwith that can cause DOS attacks. ...


4

This depends a lot on the setup of this site. If there is no DOS protection at all than it is probably not possible for an attacker to block others from accessing the site while still having access. The attacker might of course try to hack the site and configure a firewall or require authorization so that everyone else gets blocked. If there is some dumb ...


0

Whether you use one, two or a dozen servers to handle the task, the bandwidth between the client(s) and the server(s) will remain the same. The only part you can control is the way your server responds to invalid requests or to massive amounts of requests. One way it could be implemented is by using fail2ban and a firewall on the server. This way your UDP ...


5

A DDoS impacts a service negatively for several reasons (I'm not exploring the legal, social and financial consequences here): 1. Service Disruption: The most obvious -- preventing legitimate end-users from accessing a service, or affect the quality of service 2. Increase Costs: You may cause the service provider to spend more on resources to meet with ...


3

When a company or service is DDOSed the services are disrupted and sometimes taken down completely. When a user or streamer is DDOSed the same goal remains. To disrupt or take them down completely. Streamers are particularly targeted for the trolling aspect. When they are DDOSed they might be forced offline. This takes down their stream. And it hurts their ...


2

DDoS can also be used a distraction technique, so that you keep the defense busy with noise, while the much smaller (but damaging) attack runs in parallel.


3

The damage a DDoS can do is too broad of a question ... even when restricted to private websites/users. I can give you some examples of what DDoSes have been used for in the past and the damage they caused: June 1st 2016 - TeamViewer DDoSed - Caused interruption in services for users and possible cause or smoke screen for hijacking of DNS which allowed ...


0

DDoS attacks' goal is to exhaust some of your resources (bandwidth, CPU, RAM, disk, ...). They are usually of two kind: exploit a vulnerability on your server (or backend) which impact a resource with a small effort (ressource wise) on the attacker side. Sloworis is such an example. The solution is usually a fix from the vendor. exploit the fact that you ...


-1

That is exactly why having a public UDP service is extremely touchy and risky. If it represents any cause of worry before implementation, you can be 100% sure that it will be a thousand times worse when it gets live. The only ways you could deal with such a service are: with a subscription white list; the end user that needs the service signs-up and ...



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