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No, it's not a security risk to open multiple concurrent connections to MySQL or any other real database (MS Access is not a real database). They are made to work like this. The risk you can face is if someone starts more connections to the database than it can handle. In this case, other clients will not be able to be served in time. A DoS, effectively. ...


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It sounds to me like you're running into thread-safety issues. The fix for this, as you've discovered, is to not re-use connections. To your question specifically, no, there is no security risk in opening new connections each time you need to connect to the database. You don't say what technology you're using (besides MySQL) but typically if you're ...


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You should probably not execute database queries to filter data. As far as my knowledge goes there is no risk with opening more connections other than a performance loss. It seems like the problem can be solved with some asynchronous message passing though. If people can run a DoS attack by clicking a filter button rapidly you likely have more serious ...


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I will assume that you're considering stopping Broadcast Radiation, as storm control is a standard term for suppressing such used by multiple vendors such as Cisco, Juniper, and Netgear. In general, this is a problem that is addressed at the network layer, not the host layer. That is because once the packet has been transmitted to the host, and the host ...


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I experience the same issues if I tunnel my web traffic through a proxy. I'm not sure why this is; but I'm guessing that these proxies you're using are publicly available, as most of mine are. If this is the case, then odds are there are hundreds of users making near simultaneous requests through the same proxy server as you. I'm hesitant to say that ...


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While what they look for isn't disclosed, we do know how malware abuses Google searches -- attackers will search for sites that display specific signs of vulnerabilities and use that target selection. So the more you look like you're doing that in an automated fashion, the more likely you are to get blocked. So searching for "facebook" and "michael phelps" ...


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Just a theory: If you have a dynamic or shared ip address it could be that somebody who had your ip address before was abusing his internet connection to do some automatic searching. Examples: I know of some mobile internet providers (3g, 4g) who put many customers behind the same NAT ip-address. One misbehaving guy is enough to screw up things for all ...


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Only if you are signing multiple certificates. Self signing doesn't give any more validation that you are who you claim to be than a public key does, however, if you have, for example, 3 different public keys and all are signed with your same self-signing private key, then someone could verify that all 3 keys are either all invalid or all valid (though they ...


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None. There's no security benefit. Tools like openssl are designed to work with certificates. This means it's more practical to give openssl a self-signed certificate rather than no cert at all.



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