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1

It depends on the ISP and their level of customer care/repsonsibility. As a business ISP we consider any routers/firewalls/etc we provide as our responsibility; we don't expect every small to medium enterprise to have a technical team or someone competent enough to be able to protect themselves proactively so we will deal with these as and when we are ...


2

Denial of service attacks and brute force attacks on a single client are two very different things and ISPs will have different responses. Also, ISPs are not all created equal, some will be better than others at detecting and dealing with problems. Distributed denial of service attacks attempt to flood a host or hosts with malicious traffic of some kind, ...


-1

Mate to mitigate DDos attacks you need a lot of money, First thing you need is DDos appliances which cost around $200,000 a pop one box might protect you against a 20 Gbps but what happens if you get a 50 Gbps atack? Now you need more boxes so we are already up to $400,000. After we have the the boxes we need a 24/7 team that can block the attacks as the ...


0

It would depend on a number of factors, such as what protocol was used. Let's assume for the sake of the answer that the protocol in question is unencrypted HTTP. 1) Buffer Overflow. This would be the trickiest of the 3 to identify, as it could just look like a large request. It's possible that you could identify it from some common patterns that people ...


0

You could try to implement a captcha on the logging page of the web application after the first try to reduce DoS situations. Also, banning the IP which has several failed logging attempts could help prevent such situation. fail2ban is commonly used in UNIX environments for this purpose. Also, using unpredictable usernames could reduce the risks.


1

Your benchmark is possibly incomplete. I have a server which features a CPU reported as: "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 V2 @ 3.10GHz". It has four cores. On that machine, OpenSSL 1.0.1f reports (with openssl speed ecdhp224) that it can perform 9096 ECDH instances per second, using the NIST P-224 curve (a fine curve, of security rated at "112 bits", comparable ...


2

It will take a long time doing useless computation. One could conceivably use a designated-verifier non-interactive computationally zero-knowledge argument that the rest of the message is well-formed. More usefully, use proofs of work and PKE with fast decryption.


6

Actually, sending a lot of requests (and wildly clicking is one of the way of doing that) is what the DoS is about. DoS is not about sending some specially prepared data that will kill your site (like exploits, ping of deaths etc.). It's about sending a lot of requests which are cheap to send but takes a long to process. If someone writes the program ...


21

The question is a bit vague, the short answer is Yes clicking on links could DoS your site. A for a more in-depth answer you would need to look at what those links are doing. For example if every time you clicked a link it ran some monstrous database query that used all your CPU power or Disk IO, or if the links played a video that would quickly saturate ...


0

Your code is good for monitoring users activity on the server but to be honest, It can't help preventing DDOS attacks since the aim of DDOS attacks is to send tons of requests to the server to make it too busy to respond to its intended users. your code seems to be doing lots of checking to determine if the number of requests has reached beyond your ...


1

It shouldn't matter. The 802.11 de-authentication attack is not attacking the computer so the Operating System of the client should not matter. It is attacking the network itself by telling the router that the clients are done the connection and are disconnecting. There are defences for de-authentication attacks but it is not based on the OS. It is ...



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