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0

Contact Incapsula's support, they will help you set up a rule that prevent scripts/headless browsers from requesting random URLs. it can be easily done using their system


1

Please look at how SipHash replaced old hash mechanism to counter-measure DoS through hash collision. https://131002.net/siphash/#at -> Slides of the presentation "Hash-flooding DoS reloaded: attacks and defenses"


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If you run more than one server on the host, they will share the resources and an attack to one site will impact the others. There's no way to prevent it working only with your server. You must work outside of it. You could have another server in another provider in cold standby, and change DNS records of the attacked site to point to this backup server, so ...


3

This second part of data sent is actually part of a loop on order to artificially keep some activity on the line. If your script was only opening the connection to the server, send the first header, then passively wait, the server would close the connection after some inactivity timeout. Here, you maintain a low activity, actually simulating some kind of ...


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This is the slow loris attack of incomplete HTTP GET Requests. How to protect your server: Update your Apache Server, there are many updates for this attack, this attack was discovered in like 2011. Other options are to reduce timeout on your Apache Server, etc. This attack works on timeout. Here tells you how to protect your Apache from DoS/DDoS (slow ...


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Orthogonal Spread Spectrum Waveforms are more commonly known as Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum when working in the digital domain. Directly jamming such signals is very hard. You need to use a PN sequence very close (short hamming distance) to the one used to spread the original signal. Raw power is insufficient to jam the signal. If your PN sequence is ...


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In principle, yes it is possible to DoS a site by repeatedly refreshing a website in a browser. An example of accidental DoS by browser loads is the Slashdot Effect. In practice, DoS with a browser is not cost effective for an attacker because the cost of doing a page load and rendering the page in a browser usually exceeds the cost of the server for serving ...


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If the page you are refreshing is sufficiently resource intensive. In most cases it will not result in a denial of service as the latency in the network connection far exceeds the page load/cpu time. If you found a page that did significant background work, such as creating a database backup you could in theory repeatedly refresh the page and consume all ...


1

Strictly speaking, what you are asking about is a Fork Bomb. ... wherein a process continually replicates itself to deplete available system resources, causing resource starvation and slowing or crashing the system. In Windows (because you ask about that OS specifically) you cannot spawn new forks at the OS level, but you can create a cascade of ...


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My simple recommendation, and what I have done to mitigate DoS attacks on slow password hashing, is to use a password strength calculation score as primary validation method. So for a user login example: I get the user record by email. Then first check if the strength score match against the plain text password (which is obviously fast, just a couple ...


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You could try a service such as cloudflare, with multi next hop locations in each country region, they're able to correlate bad source to geolocation ip packets and drop them before they hit your servers.


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Depending on the version of Windows you are running, powershell should give you what you need. Something like this: netstat -ba |Select-String -pattern "EST" -context 1,0 Take a look at this technet article for some select-string info: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff730968.aspx


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Yes. This is why it was not described as "jam-proof". However, it just so happens that transmitting powerful RF waves across the entire RF spectrum is a) very, very power intensive (like "you can't do this outside of a fixed installation near a dedicated power plant"-type power intensive), b) ruins your own systems as well, and c) makes you an excellent ...


0

Each connection should be send completely (so send a complete incomplete request), the incomplete GET request will make the server think that you are on a poor connection and keeps waiting for the rest of the request. Each connection does require its own port, for this reason slowloris doesn't work well on windows, which limits it to ~130 ports. Sending the ...



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