Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

A 2014 discvery by prominent newspaper Aftenposten in Norway's capital, Oslo revealed several fake stations. This image shows the german crypto phone in action (revealing fake stations) Mind you, this is a small investigation that focused on politically/business sensitive areas of Oslo such as goverment buildings, embassies, high-profile enterprises etc. ...


2

Is the only place to store the code ready for execution, inside the EXIF data segments of a JPEG image? Not necessarily. However, it is much more likely that a bug exists inside the EXIF processing code. JPEG processing code for the actual image is pretty standard, using tried and tested algorithms. It is the EXIF processing which is more bespoke per ...


1

Such code would of necessity exploit a buffer overflow or other data-to-code jump trick. As such, it will only be effective against a limited range of hardware. So you can run a JPEG lint checker written for, say, ARM in a virtualized device. The exploit will be uneffective against the emulated CPU, which will then be able to report on the JPEG structure.... ...


2

This is the easy case for anti-virus software. However, do not suppose that a malware has to be unencrypted to be executable. Polymorphic code brings self-decryption to malwares, it can be helped by Metamorphism to ensure that even the very start of the decryption routine, since there must be indeed a unencrypted starting point, does not present any ...


4

Not necessarily. Malicious self-executing code take advantage of bugs affecting the code of some software handling the data. You refer to a bug in the way EXIF has to be processed, but the picture data also has to be handled by the software and the code handling this data might also have bugs which could potentially be exploited. Removing EXIF data will ...



Top 50 recent answers are included