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If you want compact signatures you should look at ECDSA. RSA is pretty much horrible if key & signature size is important. I have no idea what key strength a 256 bit RSA key would have but even 1,024 bit key is only has 80 bit strength and it takes a 15,360 bit key to achieve 256 bit strength. The raw ECDSA signatures are 2x the key length as r & ...


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If you were using Asymmetric encryption at your digital signature Asymmetric encryption offers a means of encrypting and decrypting information by using a pair of keys (as opposed to symmetric encryption which only uses one key). In asymmetric encryption, a message encrypted with one key in the pair can only be decrypted by the other key in the pair. For ...


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No it does not. You can reference Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_signature "A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of a digital message or document. A valid digital signature gives a recipient reason to believe that the message was created by a known sender, that the sender cannot deny having sent ...


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Yes; BLS can do that. (Message length is only relevant to short signatures in very limited circumstances.)


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But then why would the public key lose validity after some time? One reason is that the way certificates are signed might become outdated. For example because either the hashing algorithm or the signature algorithm/key length is too old. Take the hashing algorithm for example. At the moment SHA-1 signed certificates are on the way out. Because that ...


1

The API-SECRET as the name implies is secret and therefore should never be revealed in the client-side (nor on mobile applications). This credential is being used for generating signatures which can then be used for listing, deleting, overwriting and editing your content. You should either store it on the server side and pass only the generated signature, ...


2

A CRL has value, and is acceptable, by virtue of being signed. Since the CRL is signed, how you obtained it is of no consequence whatsoever on its acceptability. That's the point of certificates and CRL: they can be distributed over arbitrary networks, protected or not, even plain HTTP, email, avian carriers... it does not matter. Conversely, that the CRL ...


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I believe the general name for this is CRL Stapling, which might be a useful google search term for finding your answer. Here is an excellent security.SE question explaining CRL Stapling. Some thoughts on your question: Even if a CA is configured to publish multiple small CRLs, each certificate includes an extension which points to the CRL file in which ...


1

It's not exactly what you requested but at least these two are worth a look in my opinion. There's a general and abstract notation for describing security protocols, which is being used to describe quite complicated stuff such as Kerberos. The Needham-Schröder protocol can also be expressed this way. Again, not really what you were looking for, but made ...


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It sounds like you're somewhat describing the Cryptographic Message Syntax (CMS). It loosely grew out of PKCS#7.



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