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0

TrueCrypt supports deniability. If you need it, it's your best choice. It is also popular enough that it is undergoing an independent security review.


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The only thing TrueCrypt gains you is portability. Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux all have a version of TrueCrypt available for download and easy install from http://www.truecrypt.org/. TrueCrypt support is in dm-crypt 1.6+ now which gives Linux native TrueCrypt support out of the box, but you'll have to have a distribution that includes it or install it ...


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The key has to be somewhere other than on the encrypted drive, because logic. Typically the key is stored in one of three places: In the user's head (or, since keys are hard to store in a head, a password is stored that can be used to derive the key) in a TPM module inside the computer on a removable token, such as a smart card or USB fob From your ...


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From what i understand, you want to protect the data on your disk if you send it away to a repair shop? Are to able to access the disk at all? There is no need to apply such hard encryptions on the entire disk IMHO. Partition the disk and encrypt your personal partition or/and volume. Grab a copy of hirens boot cd to partition the broken drive. You should ...


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Yes, full disk encryption is designed to stop those exact attack tools from operating. And that's a good thing, not a bad thing. Tools like a RescueCD exist only to clean up the mess after someone incompetent failed to take proper care of their system. In a properly managed system, the admin will have made periodic backups of important files. A crash ...


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The internal infrastructure of many many high profile organizations is partially or entirely made up from Linux (Google for example) yet there are nearly no anti-virus products available for Linux. There are, however, 6 different MAC frameworks built into the Linux kernel itself. I won't go as far as to say that anti-virus is nothing but a marketing scam ...


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You're smart to not trust black box security, but then that leaves software security. LUKS works, is well-regarded, and supports TRIM on SSD's. Yes, you have to enter your password when you boot the machine (when it boots your /boot, actually). Having your BIOS know your password is closer to the 'convenient' side of the spectrum than the 'secure' one. ...


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Well, let me offer a theoretical solution to this problem which is secure. Of course, this is only useful for theoretical purposes, but it suggests that your problem is, at least in principal, solvable: You have the following "stuff": 1. Key: A private key. 2. Plaintext: Your private data 3. Server: An untrusted machine (untrusted because someone else ...



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