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I am not sure if there is a free software for that, but there is a free trial for EasyLock, a cross-platform data encryption software for USB devices. Once you open the product page, select Resources Tab, USB Setup for Windows and Mac. You don't have to install both of them, you just choose the compatible one with the computer where you use it for the 1st ...


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This would be mildly helpful and help defend against lots of hardware keyloggers, however there are some that take into account mouse data, this is however harder to use and requires some resources. Additionally hardware mouse loggers are rather uncommon. However if someone with significant knowledge and resources has access to the hardware you are using and ...


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If you are asking whether UEFI compromises a PC physical access, or if it creates any kind of potentially dangerous logs requires further clarification. Every PC with Windows 8 or later uses UEFI as part of its licensing requirement. UEFI Secure Boot in Win10 validates programs before execution.If you have to dual boot Win10 and Linux then linux require a ...


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AES, Serpent and Twofish are block ciphers, i.e. the basic building blocks of some cryptosystems relying on symmetric keys. AES is the standard, and there's no reason to pick anything else. All three are secure but AES has received more scrutiny to it may be considered safer. AES has better performance if your machine has hardware acceleration for it, which ...


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First, key length ("512 vs 256") is truly up to the importance of data protected, but - IMHO - if it is so important that it will require a 512 key, a disk encryption all by itself is not enough to protect that kind of data. And - unless you have a hardware-accelerated AES512 - I strongly recommend you to use 256 bit to reduce disk encryption payload: AES up ...


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To wipe the entire drive, all you have to do is wipe the spot that stores the encryption of K That statement is correct under its theoretical form. If you can guarantee you can wipe the key, and no one had ever access to that block, you have wiped the disk. I mean that if you have low-level disk access and got the right block copied somewhere, then you ...


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AFAIK there is no way around it. You have to boot into the old system, export the certificate with the corresponding private key and save it (I saved it as PFX). I then brought the file into another system (BTW a different laptop, thus different TPM) and logged in using the same username & pword as the previous machine. I was able to successfully import ...


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The purpose of a TPM module is to ensure that there is absolutely no way to obtain the keys stored on it. Whether or not it actually fulfills that purpose is a topic for another question. For now let's assume that it works as designed. That means when the TPM module is destroyed, so is the key, and so is any hope to decrypt the data encrypted with it. ...


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It is indeed possible that the block containing the key cannot be properly erased. That's why LUKS uses AFsplit to store the key on disk. The idea is essentially to expand a key that would normally be stored on a single disk block, into a format that requires many more, ensuring that the loss of a single of those blocks makes the key lost. So when erasing ...


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You mean that when you overwrite or delete data on a flash-drive, the microcontroller in that flash-drive doesn't immediately delete or overwrite the block, but instead put them on a 'delete-in-future-list' to improve performance. That's true, but also read: delete-in-future-list, that 'future' is when the microcontroller has no other actions to do. As soon ...


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For software encryption, if malware steals your master key, the data security is totally compromised. For hardware encryption, even your password is stolen, the master key is still not known to the attacker. You can change the password of certain encrypted data, but not the master key. An attacker can gain a copy of your encrypted data via different ways, ...


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There is a program that someone developed that is supposed to be able to crack LUKS passwords by utilizing a GPU, but I don't remember what the name of it was at the moment. I'll try to dig it up. Also, there are a couple of programs/scripts around that can crack LUKS passwords(bruteforce-luks and Grond), Both of which can utilize multiple threads(CPU ...


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Send one of your engineers with the laptop. Rationale: If it's important enough to send a laptop, it's important enough to send a person There will be no problems caused by ad-hoc encryption and lock-in If there are (other) problems he'll be able to solve them No problems with the client copying the software or hardware Your guy will learn a lot from the ...



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