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The answers to the linked question give a very good overview of why quantum computers break modern encryption schemes (RSA and Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC)), but not how to mitigate against it. Summary: expect it to take until ~ 2020 to work the kinks out of post-quantum algorithms - Use AES-256 for now! As mentioned in Thomas Pornin's answer to the ...


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First off, you should go type "how bitlocker works" into google and read a few articles. You will probably learn the answer to your question (and a bunch more interesting things besides!). If you want a quick answer, I found an article by Microsoft that says: During the startup process, the TPM releases the key that unlocks the encrypted partition only ...


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First I want to address the DDR3 vs DDR4 issue. The differences between DDR3 and DDR4 are mostly voltage and clock speed. I've looked to see if there's any research on cold booting DDR4, and so far it looks like there's no academic papers out concerning their practicality. While commercial forensics labs may be performing cold boot attacks on DDR4 they're ...


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This article at malwarebytes is very informative. The ransomware uses a small kernel with a built in crypto engine, and when it pretends to run chkdsk it actually encrypts the MFT using a key generated for that machine and sent to the attacker. The same engine will run the decrypt based on a key given when you pay the attacker. As the MFT is the ...


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You can create deniable encryption using dm-crypt and remote header or raw dm-crypt encryption and block device offsets (1, 2). It's not as easy as TrueCrypt though and it's extremely ready to get wrong, as dm-crypt is a very low level tool, but you have more control and flexibility.


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Legal note: That depends on what you expect to achieve with plausible deniability: This can bite you in the ass in several countries (like the UK, for example.) The police there know of the existence of TrueCrypt, and under the RIPA Act (and similar legislation elsewhere), they may fine and/or imprison you if you do not provide the decryption key to all ...


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I have heard that the full disk encryption helps protect against malware threats, specifically in this case a malware which could programmatically copy the information while it was temporarily saved on the servers. Full disk encryption does not protect against anything that uses the OS interfaces to read and write to the device in question while the ...


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This likely will become a problem, if you simply try to use tresor-xts-plain or tresor-xts-plain64. While I haven't tested it extensively, even when I tried TRESOR even with cbc-essiv, it resulted in a non-working system. Only cbc-plain worked, which does use a single key. The way I personally use TRESOR is with tresor-cbc-plain chained with ...


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No one has ever actually demonstrated successful recovery of overwritten data on a modern hard drive. It's an urban legend stemming from the days of hard drives with capacities orders of magnitude lower, which had enough inefficiency in their data storage that it was potentially an issue. See this Wikipedia article and its references.


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It looks like this is what you want. It creates a copy of the header, without making any assumptions about the header size. # cryptsetup luksHeaderBackup /dev/sda5 --header-backup-file /tmp/luks-header But I'm not sure if I 100% understand your question. Are you asking how to extract the LUKS header including the master key, or just the encrypted master ...


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GRUB itself does not let you modify /boot, but it does allow you to boot into a rescue shell in the unencrypted initramfs in /boot, which does. While GRUB itself does not provide much ability to tamper with /boot, it will allow you to boot into single user mode with a rescue shell. Your /boot contains the bootloader, along with your kernel, and the ...


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It is not necessarily a secure idea. Solid state drives have what is called overprovisioning space, which is a small amount of space that is accessible only to the hard drive firmware (FTL, or Flash Translation Layer), and is used for wear leveling. This means that, even when your hard drive shows 100% usage, there is still some amount which is unused. The ...


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Some filesystems support DAX, which stands for Direct Access. It's a feature which bypasses the page cache, so a filesystem encrypted with TRESOR will not leak much if any unencrypted data when you read and write to it. You can put a file in tmpfs and create a loopback device and encrypt it with TRESOR, then format it with a filesystem that supports DAX. ...


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In other words, full disk encryption only provides data at rest security. Nothing new here! Data at rest security means that the literal data itself cannot be decrypted without the key. If the key is still in memory while the device is powered on, then anyone with access to the device (e.g. if the device is unlocked, or if it gets hacked, or cold booted, or ...


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What's going on is that, per the article, Google has the ability to remotely tell your phone to set a new password, which applies to unlocking the phone and unlocking the encryption key. They aren't remotely recalling your encryption key or the unencrypted data, but they are able to sidestep it because your phone will listen to mobile device mgmt ...


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That is true. Third party software can so similar if they have the phone in their possession. Phone storage encryption with encrypt your files "/sdcard" being some application data and some of your personal files in most cases. In other it will just encrypt your personal data. Depends if the applications installed use /sdcard to say store database/config ...



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