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2

You can use dropbear ssh to ssh to your machine and then unlock the LUKS volume. There's a tutorial here which can assist you with setting up.


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Compression is Often a Bad Idea, It is a performance killer (unless your using Hardware compression), Most Binary information Compresses very poorly. Only Text is known to save you a lot of disk space when storing. But compressing a volume exposes it to more risk of data loss (not only the encryption but also the compression algorithm can leak data or lose ...


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The point of strong password hashing functions is to make password processing slow so that attackers find it harder to run a brute force attack on your password. Unfortunately it makes it slower for you too; this is the limit of the exercise. At best, you make the function n times slower for you and n times slower (with the same n) for the attacker; but the ...


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You've answered the question yourself. You're trying to implement DRM to prevent users from getting the video off the device. In practice there is little you can do to prevent this. There will always be ways to copy the stream, even intercepting the stream (it has to be displayed on the device at some point right?). So the only thing you can do is make it ...


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In modern versions of windows and most *nix distributions you typically run with lower level privileges and then elevate your privileges ("run as" / UAC / sudo / etc.) to do more risky tasks. In some cases there is just a prompt, but a more secure configuration would require the password each time you elevate. If a malicious script or malware runs and want ...


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The answer to your question depends on the threats you're fighting against. If you're only concern is other people stealing your system, your're fine by using FDE as this prevents them from even getting to the point where they could attack the password. This assumes that your boot-password is strong and you power your machine down often. However, if you ...


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How fast can you crack AES-256? Either never (within next two centuries) or within days. AES-256 is considered incrackable by itself. Even most implementations are considered safe. (no side-channels). OTR protocol uses AES-128 (weaker than AES-256) as symmetric encryption algorithm and the world's best funded intelligence agency NSA wasn't able to decrypt ...


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AES-256 is definitely secure for file storage. The only weakness is the key that you choose. As long as you choose a strong key for it, AES-256 will keep your files safe. According to this Wikipedia page, the best attack on AES was published in 2011 and to break AES-256, it still required 2^254.4 operations. The page further states that: This is a very ...


2

AES 256 is a standard of the US Government to protect their own files (FIPS 197). Yes, there are stronger methods and deeper cryptography and NIST is reviewing their standards and will upgrade to something stronger in the future, but for the average person, AES 256 will suffice as a strong encryption. Now the question will be: how will you handle the keys?


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The basic idea of the TPM is that it's a hardware-bound identity, meaning it uniquely identifies a single computer. In the PC case, 'computer' means 'motherboard': the TPM needs be integrated into the boot process in a particular way, which requires the cooperation of the BIOS, which lives on the motherboard. Having a TPM on a daughter card breaks that ...


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From your example, I think the answer is pretty straightforward. I think there are several ways to do it depending on your preferred workflow but the simplest is probably... When you update the image, take a hash of the image before uploading it. Then, when you download it, check the hash before use. Of course, that is only reasonable if you don't update ...


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Well, If I seeing things right, you posed two questions: What options exist for authenticated full-disk encryption? How can I securely store disk images in the cloud? Now to answer your questions: There's no such thing as authenticated full-disk encryption (FDE). FDE needs you to have random access to every single sector on the drive, so you'd have to ...



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