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The SSD actually encrypts all the data by default out of the box. The drive has an encryption key hard coded into the device firmware. All the data is encrypted/decrypted with this key. Even if you do not set a HDD password in Bios, the data is still encrypted on the raw disk. The sole purpose of your bios password is to restrict access to the encryption ...


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I have not found information like this either, and I'm not sure it's available. I recently used one of these disks with the harddrive password enabled. The AES encryption on these disks is this simple to use and performs excellently. But there's no way to verify that it's actually working. It is black box encryption. A while back I answered a similar ...


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I can confirm that the performance of hardware encrypted drives is much better than software encryption. In fact, I find software encryption hinders performance so much, it is almost unbearable to do "heavy lifting" like using virtual machines, compiling software, etc. The design of these drives seems basically right. They're based on the password model ...


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Normally on recent phones I have observed that /data and /mnt/sdcard is encrypted using dm-crypt which does block level encryption and external sdcard is encrypted using eCryptfs which does file-level encryption refer comments in this method -http://androidxref.com/4.4.4_r1/xref/system/vold/cryptfs.c#1587 Technically it is possible to encrypt sdcard ...


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TL;TR It really depends on the organization. Things to consider: How seriously do they take security? Is there a lot of travel that would lead to an increased risk of compromise? Is a stolen computer or physical removal of a drive a risk? The overhead for putting this into place is low. For a large company with lot of company travel it's worth it to ...


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To paraphrase you: "these days" people also dump everything in cloud storage, and mail it all over the world. Once the files leave the encrypted disk, the only protection they have is the password. And since you are talking about 'an organization' it is hard to predict peoples' behaviour about this. Your users may be "expected to follow password management ...


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I suspect this is what you're looking for. It uses luks encrypted volume which is widely supported and store the password/key within the TPM (NVRAM). The key can be sealed (Trusted Computing terminology) against the proper boot sequence (BIOS, PCI ROMs, MBR, Boot Loader, etc). In other words, the key is derived from the running environment. If something ...



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