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3

The criticisms about XTS make sense in a context when attackers can observe successive versions of the encrypted disk (i.e. the attacker steals your laptop, makes an image of the whole disk, then puts the laptop back in your bag, and you did not notice anything; and he does it again tomorrow, and the day after tomorrow, and so on...). With XTS, every 16-byte ...


0

It is not possible to prevent a root or administrator user from accessing a file under control of the OS. Your suggestion of obscuring the file might prevent someone from piecing it together in a meaningful way, but isn't really securing the file. Your thought to use an encrypted filesystem simply encrypts the files on disk such that only users with access ...


6

Ye cannot defeat root ! The root user can have complete control of the machine. The best that you can hope for is encryption: use GnuPG to encrypt the data with a sufficiently strong random password, that, of course, you won't reveal to the root user. However, as soon as you decrypt the file on the machine, wherever you put it, root will be able to see it. ...


0

Unless you specifically enabled full device encryption, merely setting a device password does not encrypt the device. Hard disks have supported passwords for decades, but have not had encryption capabilities until recently. These passwords just won't expose the raw device to the BIOS until you've unlocked them, but the actual data remains unencrypted.


2

Usually, disks supporting encryption do this in two steps. In step one (usually on factory manufacture) a secret key is chosen at random. Then, a decryption key is chosen, and initially it is blank. The secret key is encrypted using the decryption key and, when the system is powered up, an API exists whereby the user can supply the decryption key, if ...



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