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All current disk encryption methods strength relies on the key secrecy. While your key remains a secret (and it needs to be strong enough to remain one), then the content of your disk at rest remains a secret. I say "disk at rest" because when the computer is running, ie. you already unlocked the drive yourself, then your file-system is accessible and also ...


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It is doable to crack 1024-bit RSA keys but it takes many years as you can test here; so that is why Apple defies FBI and offers encryption by default on new operating system . So if you have precious information to hide, there is a way, for a skilled and well equipped team, to take advantage of data remanence using cold boot attack if you choose to leave ...


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Any data that is encrypted with publicly available encryption can be decrypted... otherwise I can assure you that it such encryption algo's would not be available to the public. For the "every day user" there are no options for encryption that are not able to be broken. Our government would not and does not allow it. "Deleting" data from a hard drive is an ...


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Macs use FileVault to encrypt your data. It's been available on prior OS X versions, but I believe now with Yosemite, it's encouraged to use it and much easier for the standard user to toggle it. This encrypts your hard drive. Technically, it would still be possible for someone to retrieve the data from an encrypted drive. To crack AES, you would need a lot ...


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It also depends on your storage system. For example, if you have de-duplication, guest VMs may be able to establish whether known blocks of data are already stored, for example: (1) create a VM and store 10,000 reference files; (2) create another VM and store 30,000 files sampled without replacement from (A) the 10,000 reference files on VM 1, (B) 10,000 new ...


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Here are 2 more advantages (assuming you use new encryption keys each time you re-install): If you run file recovery tools that scan the full block device, e.g. PhotoRec, you do not have to checks tons of old files that are no longer of interest. If you run filesystem repair tools that scan the full block device, you do not run the risk of confusing ...


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Truecrypt works with linux, it just doesn't work with full disk encryption. Within linux, you can mount a Truecrypt volume that features plausible deniability, and then simply chroot it. Or if you feel fancy, have the volume contain a Docker image, and "Dock" it.


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Create a batch file: shutdown.bat @echo off shutdown.exe /r /t 00 and then create hotkeys to run it.


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There's a lot more flexibility with dm-crypt than basic hardware encryption. With dm-crypt LUKS (or plain), you can use keyfiles instead of passphrases. If you set it up correctly, you can have a USB drive that contains your boot partition and the keyfile to unlock the root partition. After boot, you can remove the USB drive to keep it safe or leave it in ...


2

Do you trust the hardware encryption on the SSD? If you do then it's fine. If you don't trust it then you're better off with LUKS since not many vendors provide sources for the firmware, so you won't be able to audit it.


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So it seems that BSD's GELI provides this - from the manpage: Can optionally perform data authentication (integrity verifica- tion) utilizing one of the following algorithms: HMAC/MD5, HMAC/SHA1, HMAC/RIPEMD160, HMAC/SHA256, HMAC/SHA384 or HMAC/SHA512.


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No expert but I do know that WP8 does indeed use bitlocker and also uses hardware encryption where possible. So I doubt that you can obtain a usable dump from a standard phone. Having been involved with a hardware problem on the Nokia phones recently, all I can say is that the engineers use special debug versions of the OS to do hardware level logging and ...


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Android disk encryption is based on dm-crypt and is a full-disk encryption, meaning everything is encrypted using the same master secret. This is different from approach employed by iOS where different files are encrypted with different master secrets based on their protection classes. Effectively, all files on Android-encrypted disks share same protection ...


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Let me first gather your requirements and assumptions: Data storage appears in the system as a mountable disk All data on data storage is encrypted Synchronization with cloud is not needed frequently. Complete image upload/download is good enough With this assumptions any virtual disk solution with encryption of stored data can meet your requirements. ...


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Nothing is futile, and there are no silver bullets. Everything depends. There was a sidebar about using disk encryption. That is protecting against a different attack surface, so lets ignore it. The question asks if it makes sense to encrypt data that is in a database, under the assumption that it needs to be plaintext for a web client. The presented ...


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It depends on from which threats are you going to protect. Encrypting data on database level is great protection, when you have so many IT employees, that you're able to divite them into teams responsible for each layer. For example, banks and credit cards acquirers use PCI DSS security standard, which require such protection along with dividing IT staff ...



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