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Cloud providers can provide single tenant hardware so your VMs are isolated from other customers and clients. A number of financial regulators are expecting this to be enabled for confidential / regulated data when stored in the cloud. For example, Amazon AWS has the concept of a 'dedicated instance'. See ...


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I am wondering when I put my laptop to hibernation if the encryption keys are wiped from the RAM before the computer is shutdown? No because the because the master decryption keys are kept in DRAM whatever the encryption tool you use. or if I have to wait a few minutes to be quite immune against cold boot attacks? Some authors stated ...


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Regarding #1, "Does the FBI/NSA or other government agencies have access to my data or can easily decrypt them?" legality aside, there are several factors to consider. "Easy" is relative. Depending on the charges, and the value of the data that is encrypted, they may have more or less incentive to break the encryption. If it's a list of neighborhood ...


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The Electronic Frontier Foundation maintains an excellent FAQ on digital rights regarding search and seizure of computing devices. For your specific questions: (I'm going to assume US, because you reference FBI and NSA) 1. Can government agencies break disk encryption? Without a warrant or probable cause, no. With a warrant, if your question is: "Can the ...


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Talking legally, of course they don't if they don't have court order,technically, i really doubt that, when it comes to decryption, we are basically talking about how strong is the encryption algorithm and if they can crack it. No, even if you are arrested police can search your devices only in limited circumstances , except at borders, they can search it ...


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I don't know do they? If you're asking the tinfoil hat type of question: Does the FBI/NSA have access to all harddrives on the internet? Then I believe the answer is no. If a court order is handed down for access to your harddrive then you will need to give it to them. If a court order gives them access to your harddrive and your harddrive is encrypted ...


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Already before UEFI, infected firmware could do what it wanted, including spying on you. What changed, is that UEFI now has a network stack, making writing payloads much easier. Also, if you have attackers with physical access, you have already lost.


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Well... if attacker had physical access, then they'd probably find UEFI easier to hack than BIOS. UEFI is a more complex OS than BIOS was. An attacker could add a background Runtime Service that watched you and phoned home. An attacker could also do that with BIOS, they'd just have to hook interrupts. You can use Intel's CHIPSEC and the UEFItool to dump your ...


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Below blog has good intro to Windows' use of Secure Boot, Trusted Boot, and Measured Boot: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/olivnie/archive/2013/01/09/windows-8-trusted-boot-secure-boot-measured-boot.aspx As to 'horrificially insecure', None of these are fully-secure, for example Intel has created Boot Guard technology to help protect system at silicon/firmware ...


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All current disk encryption methods strength relies on the key secrecy. While your key remains a secret (and it needs to be strong enough to remain one), then the content of your disk at rest remains a secret. I say "disk at rest" because when the computer is running, ie. you already unlocked the drive yourself, then your file-system is accessible and also ...


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It is doable to crack 1024-bit RSA keys but it takes many years as you can test here; so that is why Apple defies FBI and offers encryption by default on new operating system . So if you have precious information to hide, there is a way, for a skilled and well equipped team, to take advantage of data remanence using cold boot attack if you choose to leave ...


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Any data that is encrypted with publicly available encryption can be decrypted... otherwise I can assure you that it such encryption algo's would not be available to the public. For the "every day user" there are no options for encryption that are not able to be broken. Our government would not and does not allow it. "Deleting" data from a hard drive is an ...


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Macs use FileVault to encrypt your data. It's been available on prior OS X versions, but I believe now with Yosemite, it's encouraged to use it and much easier for the standard user to toggle it. This encrypts your hard drive. Technically, it would still be possible for someone to retrieve the data from an encrypted drive. To crack AES, you would need a lot ...



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