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There is just one thing I want to correct in the good answer of @JoedeLyes: Tor has no control over the traffic between the exist node and the destination server. I mean it can not encrypt in anyway the communication between the exit node and the destination server, and that is one of the weaknesses of Tor because exit nodes are vulnerable to eavesdrop. As ...


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For your question, you can imagine TOR like a proxy whose administrator can see everything you do if it is not encrypted. Every unencrypted content you send through TOR can be seen by the owner of the first and the last node. And every content not signed can be potentially altered by these nodes. Here is an article about a security researcher trying to ...


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UPDATE Your device (W8901G) is in all likelihood VULNERABLE, to the very exploit described below, and more, and even more. I think that the steps suggested below may ameliorate your situation, but unless a firmware fix is available from TP-Link, you should consider replacing your router. The TP-Link search form did not supply any link (W8901G is ...


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That's likely caused by a classic Cross-Site Request Forgery attack from back in the day. See the image below that explains the attack. Some countermeasures: Change the default LAN network IPv4 range and make sure the router IP is NOT 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 - make it a seemingly random one, e.g. 192.168.X.21 or something of that sort (lol @ security by ...


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Where nmap is used during a security test any information revealed by the scan may be useful as part of the test. In the case of reverse DNS lookups it can be specifically of use as some services will only respond to requests made to a host name and not an IP address. So if your test starts with a range of IP addresses, part of the review would be to ...


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Is this the end of malware use of DNS? No. Might tweak the landscape a little, but not hugely. It seems like the dataset in the news article could protect against both. It's useful for catching people using malware that other people have caught before. It is not useful for catching someone who sets up a burner domain just for their attack ...


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“Immortal” Malware Domains are those which were identified as malicious anywhere between 90 and 360 days ago. but according to google safebrowsing, are still actively involved in badness. Some of these domains have been on the DNS-BH List for YEARS. This is quoted from the website you mentioned. This means it all depends if what you found is a ...


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It only indicates that this domain was once added to the list of malware domains because somebody reported it. It does not indicate that the site had ever malware on it (might be a false report) or that it has now malware on it (might got cleaned in the mean time). You should also check the date of the entry to see if it is a recent one or an old one - there ...


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Full disclosure, I work for a company that develops DDoS mitigation and web application firewall services DNS amplification is a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack in which the attacker exploits vulnerabilities in domain name system (DNS) servers to turn initially small queries into much larger payloads, which are used to bring down the victim’s ...


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Are there firewalls we can use that have domain based rules, instead of IP based so our API requests continue to arrive un-interrupted yet we continue to block all other outbound connections? Yes, although usually through a proxy functionality rather than a traditional firewall rule sense. For example, the Check Point URL Filtering Software Blade ...


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A DNS attack happens when an attacker can influence how your computer will resolve host/domain names. That can happen if an attacker is able to: Change the DNS server IP address in the network settings on your computer Change the DNS server IP address in the network settings on your router Change the hosts file on your computer Intercept and change DNS ...


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When would a DNS attack actually happen? [...] [W]hen [...] my pc [first receives DNS servers from] the router which is connected to my isp's modem? That's an interesting possibility, to somehow inject an attacker's DNS servers in DHCP replies. This is not how it's usually done however, because an attacker can't get between the user's computer and the ...


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A successful DNS redirection means the attacker can redirect you wherever he wants. He can setup a malicious website to exploit your system by various techniques. One example would be the recent exploits from Hacking Team; two 0-Days that can be used to exploit a fully patched machine remotely without any user interaction on all systems running Flash. So ...


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if you look at the meaning of DNS you can find your answer : domain name server, the system that automatically translates Internet addresses to the numeric machine addresses that computers use. With some DNS attacks you can redirect and pass victim's data to your server (e.g a mikrotik server), so you can sniff victim's data and inject something in the ...


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The process of establishing a full trust chain between two system using TLS is the following: 1/ Create or obtain the root CA X509 certificate. 2/ Obtain all intermediate signing authorities. 3/ generate a leaf X509 certificate and have it signed by the authority immediately higher in the trust chain (either an intermediate CA or the root CA if you're using ...



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