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Another problem is, that most modern websites requests resources from other hosts (JS libraries from a CND or even from a server controlled by the website owner) and the URI contains the DNS name in the most cases. You would have to know the IP addresses and proper HOST header of all the resources the desired website needs and stop your browser to resolve ...


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Most likely not. IPv6 support is still quite patchy in many parts of the world. The delay is most likely caused by bad routing or network packets having to go through too many hops. You can test out your IPv6 connection here. The hosts file is used to bypass DNS and make your access to websites matching domains listed slightly faster, not slower. A whois ...


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These days Google uses HTTPS even for their search, which makes it relatively easy for you to verify that your connection is secure. This does not absolutely grantee that your connection isn't being rerouted by an attacker, but it does guarantee they're not able to view or manipulate your traffic and therefore the attacker would have little motivation to do ...


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The default permissions on hosts files out of the box keep them as protected as they're going to be. You'll want to do what schroeder said and setup an alert that checks the hash of that file to see if it's been modified and if so it should notify you. It's not as common an attack path and is easily remedied so an alert and responsive security in this case ...


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An option is to create a hash of the file and have a program (or script) regularly compare the stored hash with the current hash of the file. While it will not prevent modifications, it will detect changes and alert you (detective vs preventative control)


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A common tactic of malware is to rewrite part of the hosts file to redirect your browsing. For example, redirecting ads to the hacker's own ads, in order to generate revenue. The easiest way to protect this file is to make it read only. This isn't a great level of protection, as it's easily disabled by malware on your machine. A better way to protect it ...


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Cookies that are used to maintain session state must have a limited scope. Using JavaScript track users by their session id, means you can't use the httpOnly cookie flag. Scoping cookies to *.foobar.com means that XSS on *.foobar.com could compromise this cookie value. Or to put this another way, if a session id is scoped to *.foobar.com and doesn't have ...



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