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12

Since it's still same domain, do we need to change anything regarding our SSL? Since the domain is the same and paths are not stored in the certificate, you can continue using your old certificate. Even if dk and no is folder names in our IIS virtual folder? The internal configuration does not matter here (the client verifying the certificate does ...


11

Yes and No. It's possible to have multiple certs that all have the same domain name on it. You could have a Comodo example.org cert and an Entrust example.org cert, both of them valid and official, no problem. I believe some load balancers will rotate which one is used on a per-connection basis, but only in a round-robin fashion. The No is that you're ...


6

You're fine. A TLS certificate validates the server machine (or host machine), not the page or folder. For example, all of *.stackexchange.com shares a single certificate. By inspecting the cert for this page in Chrome: Issued to: ssl333133.cloudflaressl.com Subject Alternative Names: DNS Name=ssl333133.cloudflaressl.com DNS ...


6

Nope. No web server can support this feature; not now, not ever. Here's why: HTTPS follows these steps in this order: Client connects to the server SSL/TLS negotiation (includes exchanging certificates, certificate verification, and encryption setup) Client sends request (includes server hostname, path, cookies, etc) Server sends back response (includes ...


5

To prevent a negative impact on your SEO you can redirect any incoming content that isn't for your own domain to google to prevent the impression of duplicate content. How this can be done relies on your webserver. // You can limit the answers of your webserver to a specific domain. It is explained here. You can modify the catchall entry with a redirection ...


5

You certainly need SSL certificates for both domains. That does not necessarily mean two separate certificates, however. While this is not a candidate for a wildcard cert, (since these are two actual domains, and not subdomains of a single domain) but the subject alternate name (SAN) field of a SSL certificate can contain multiple domain names, so you can ...


4

If you have definite proof that malware is being distributed from there, you might get the hoster to shutdown the website. Other than that, the person who has generic.com has every right to host anything that he wants on it. Unless its a really specific domain name that is completely unique and you have reason to believe it was created to distribute ...


2

To answer the first two bullet points: Firefox has its own list of trusted CAs. You can add certificates in Menu Button>Options>Advanced>Certificates(tab)>View Certificates>Authorities(tab). This is for Firefox version 38. Yes Google is trying to shame people into moving from SHA1 to a more secure hash such as SHA2. Here is the chromium blog post about it. ...


2

Contact the registrar that the domain is registered with. You can use any WHOIS search engine to gain the abuse contact details for the registrar, as well as (providing that they haven't made the WHOIS data private) the owner's contact details. I often use the who.is search for WHOIS information (I find that there are a few 'WHOIS search' providers out ...


2

When workstation joins domain, following happens: Workstation creates some random password, asks Domain Controller to create machine account and associate it with this password. User account must have "Add machine to domain" permission, domain admins do have this permission. Since Windows does not use names internally, but use SIDs for any account, ...


2

The answer very much depends on the receiving MTA's configuration. However, it can (and should) be done. Postfix has a smtpd_sender_restrictions configuration option which controls what happens when it sees a MAIL FROM message. One such configuration option is reject_unknown_sender_domainwhich validates that the sender domain has an A or MX record, i.e. the ...


1

Wildcard certificates are not much costly as you think, I bought wildcard certificate at $42 for one year, which I think it is affordable. https://www.ssl2buy.com/wildcard-ssl-certificate There is difference between single and wildcard certificate because a standard certificate can secure only your single website and wildcard certificate can secure ...


1

Your ISP and your DNS provider are able to see that you are connecting to subdomain.domain.com, but neither are able to see the entire URL that you are requesting. The first thing that happens is that your DNS provider will see that you are requesting the IP address that subdomain.domain.com points to. So, if you are using your ISP's DNS service, your ISP ...


1

Report this to the registrar Report this to the DNS service they are using Redirect all incoming requests from that domain name to a page or another website. It sounds like you've done 1. Action 2 may result in a better response - technically the registrar can do little. You'll want to read the terms of service for both 1 and 2, and find out if there's ...


1

You should modify your DNS settings to set up SPF for your domain, so email messages sent from an outside IP address are rejected. By the way, the recommendation you link to in your post aims to achieve the same result. That would be the more effective technique. Failing to do so, your best bet would be to digitally sign all exchanged inter-domain emails ...


1

I'm assuming what you mean is that visitors to another site will make client side requests to your API, and you want to attribute these requests to that site. There are several ways to go about this depending on how strong you need the authentication to be. If you're just using the data for statistical purposes and maybe to stop unauthorized use from very ...


1

Your router could be hacked. If your router has or had a default password, you could be victim of drive-by-hijacking. A malicious javascript can try to login to your router, change the DNS settings, and there you are. If this is the case, this problem is on your home network only. If you take your laptop elsewhere, it should not happen. However, it could be ...



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