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0

What program are you using to view the email? It looks as if you are using the web interface from mail.com to read the email (mail.com is an email provider). If this is the case, they are simply using an intermediate script as target of the addresses. When you click an address from the webmail, the goal is that the user writes a new email to that address, ...


0

The reason the master process has to be started as root is because only root can bind to a port in the range of the first 1024 "privileged" ports. Running any type of software as root could be considered a security thread but it also depends how secure the software itself is, and if updates/patches are applied regularly. If you would like to add an extra ...


1

The Postfix master process is the one that launches the other daemons. In particular, it launches the daemon that delivers mail locally; the latter must be able to impersonate any user ID in the system, which involves beginning its life as root. Thus, it is mostly unavoidable that the master process runs as root; otherwise, it would not work at all. ...


0

Gmail simply never reveals sender IP as per its policy. While this policy gives peace of mind to gmail user but at the same place grants abusers a cosy corner.


2

Have a look at https://ssl-tools.net/mailservers. There you can get information about the mail server, including the support for SSL 3.0. But, please note that POODLE is about a specific attack pattern which uses a design flaw in SSL 3.0 and which works fine with HTTP to steal session cookies. But, while it is good to disable SSL 3.0 completely, the idea of ...


18

Changing your e-mail and phone number is silly. Your phone number, unless unlisted, is a matter of public record and easily discoverable. Even if unlisted, it is still a publicly shared identifier that can be discovered with some investigating. Your e-mail address is also a public identifier and can be discovered with some effort. Having identifiers in ...


6

If the attacker gained access to your PayPal account via your username and password, the best thing to do is change your email and bank passwords. I'm hoping that you did not use the same password for all of these accounts. If you did re-use your password for PayPal on other accounts (Amazon, Ebay, etc), I would highly recommend changing those passwords as ...


0

They do not do it. Attempting to decrypt a message can be illegal depending on the country. They either send it through as a binary blob or block altogether.


0

I tested. GMAIL blocks all encrypted archives. I attempted to send a password protected zip containing a txt file, and got the following reply: host gmail-smtp-in.l.google.com[2a00:1450:4010:c05::1a] said: 552-5.7.0 This message was blocked because its content presents a potential 552-5.7.0 security issue. Please visit 552-5.7.0 ...


5

They can't. Encryption is encryption. Email services won't spend time and energy trying to brute force your password, nor do I believe they would create backdoors for the sake of email. If they let you send encrypted archives then they simply don't check the contents.


1

The headers on the first email are consistent with it being sent using Yahoo's webmail interface from a person using an IP address from Cablevision's internet service. The headers on the second are consistent with it being sent via Gmail's webmail interface; Google does not provide any information about the sender's IP or location. Are they the same person ...


0

There is no way to tell with certitude if this came from the same user without more information from both Yahoo and Google, which would not be forthcoming. The received from IP (at least with Gmail for sure) is changed to Google's so you can't see the original IP address. This may also be the case with Yahoo.


2

Everyone is trying to explain the arms race, which is true, but there is the very simple logic that if spamfilters were perfect, then spam would not exist anymore because it's no longer profitable. And a spambox would not exist because we are 100% sure of what is spam and what is not, so it could go straight to trash without landing in a spambox first. ...


2

As @MrDCGN and @saltface pointed out, the tracking is done using hidden objects in the HTML view of the email. Blocking this kind of tracking can be achieved in a few ways: Stop using HTML view, and use only plain text. This would prevent loading of any non-text object, and will damage RTF formatting. Disable image loading in the settings of the email ...


5

I'm not familiar with Sidekick, but another way to verify that an email has been opened is to use an image tag in the body of an HTML email. Let us pretend that the image tag looks like <img src="server.com/images/tracker.jpg?recipient=sparkler@domain.com" /> The server delivering tracker.jpg can then record the query string ...


15

They track opens the same way every other email sending/analytics company does it: by inserting a tracking pixel within the HTML of the email. If your email client blocks image loading by default, then you won't be tracked. If you load the images, or your client automatically downloads the images (iPhone email client) then you're being tracked. You can see ...


0

Use http://www.ipligence.com/geolocation or something similar to geolocate an ip address in case of 10.130.15.171, that is a private ip address located on your network Private IP address ranges The ranges and the amount of usable IP's are as follows: 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 Addresses: 16,777,216 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 Addresses: 1,048,576 ...


2

OH MAN am I glad that I no longer have to deal with these. I would explain how a spam filter actually works. Generally spam filters have a "rating" system (The one provided to our company by Google worked this way). The rating would go up if it matched known-patterns The rating would go up if it matched known keywords (Many keywords related to drugs, ...


0

You are correct in that contacts may receive a "certificate expired", if they attempt to encrypt an email to you first and attempt to use the expired, cached certificate (this doesn't apply to signed-only emails). Their email client may allow them to proceed if they persist. Additionally, there's a small chance that the certificate chain may have changed ...


2

Theory is that everything works automatically. Practice sometimes differs. I suppose that you are talking about S/MIME and X.509 certificates. With S/MIME, when you send an email: The email is encrypted with the public key of the recipient, so you have to know the current recipient's certificate. The email is signed with your private key and the signature ...


0

Checked it out. Authmechanism=04 is a hexadecimal notation that tells you that the Exchange server did authenticate by IP-address. With this, I mean that you have configured your Exchange server to treat certain IP addresses or ranges to be "trusted" in the parlance that it will bypass regular username/password authentication and/or eventual spam/virus ...


1

You seem to talk about two different things: retrieving mail and encrypting mail. From reading the question I think encryption is not what this is about. So for now I forget about it. When you login to Hotmail or Gmail via your browser, you use your login. It looks like you have more email addresses and possibly popboxes. Now it depends on how you setup ...


2

The email spam filters are not 100% effective, that's a fact and you said it correctly. As their name suggests they are filters, if something doesn't match the filter, it slips through, but that is why there are multiple levels of security used while receiving an email. Therefore if one fails, there are more checks being performed. This time it got caught by ...


1

How it works: Picture a pipe. The pipe has a huge variety of valves and possible turns (blocked off by more valves), and information flows to and from a variety of points. The pipe is the internet, and, in some cases, your e-mail providers. Your spy is trying to get you to open a valve to a point HE controls so he can tell when you read his e-mail, so he ...


10

A spam filter can be created that will block all spam; one could simply have the filter block all incoming email. Most users would find such a filter unacceptable, though, so the challenge is to find a balance between blocking email that users don't want to receive, but at the same time allowing through all the email they want to receive. If the filter is ...


3

You can't necessarily know if an email you receive is designed to be tracked but as tracking is limited to certain techniques, you can infer a higher probability of this behaviour if the email seems tailored towards such an end: Email includes images that need to be downloaded remotely Typically an email can have all images and formatting stored internally ...


7

The explanation I have always used is the analogy of "Why did my bullet proof vest not stop that bullet?" is because the bullet proof is a misnomer, and someone simply used a bullet designed to defeat your bullet resistant vest ;) Most people seem to get that concept that it is a balance of too tight (false positives restricting mail flow) and too loose ...


22

The main function of a SPAM filter is to block anything that looks like a SPAM. The objective of an anti-virus software is to detect and remove anything that possess the signature of a virus (worms included) based on the virus definition installed. Both programs work differently based on different heuristics. An email that doesn't look like a SPAM may ...


10

I like to use the analogy of an arms race as it's a familiar theme that non-technical people understand. Analogies are useful when trying to explain concepts such as this. Also throw in statistics. Last, use some pseudo-personal stuff to make them feel like you're in the same boat. Something like this may work: I completely understand your frustration with ...


3

You were right in your explanation. In trying to relay the issue, I would try to explain in less technical terms. Non-tech people don't like, and will have problems understanding technical explanations. So try to avoid them. Especially when they're already upset. I like to use cars. In this case, spam filters are like looking at a car. A look at the car ...


54

Your answer is pretty OK, but you could explain the ongoing "game" between spammers and spamfilters a bit more. This makes it understandable why some spam always will find its way to the customer. Spam filters try to catch all mail that is spam. Spammers try to create mails that are trusted not to be spam - both by spam filters and by humans. For ...


6

I think your answer is correct. Nothing is 100% bullet proof. That is why the user has to have some awareness and some knowledge to understand when and how things look strange and what to do next. (this last part is forgotten and people tend to trust too much in applications) That is why those situations occur, people discover that applications are not 100% ...


9

No, they can only see the encrypted traffic flowing from yourself to Google's servers. They cannot see the actual content of the traffic (your emails). However, if your ISP forces you through a web proxy and makes you use their certificate, they could then see the content of your traffic. I would be cautious if you see untrusted certs when going to ...


0

There is usually a trade-off between security and usability. As a web developer, you have to decide what level of security is required for your application and strike a balance between the two. As correctly pointed out by you, there is an inconsistent treatment on the protection of email addresses on many websites. The reason is fairly simple: A login ...


1

If this is supposed to be a secure system to that extent and since the email address is disclosed elsewhere, the developers could make the username a randomly generated number instead of the user's email address. This closes the information leakage gap. For instance, for a generated numerical username: Failed login: "Username incorrect" Failed password: ...


-2

The only website i found that could check multiple ip address in dns blacklist database is http://www.blchecktool.com


0

as suggested by dave_thompson_085, I change cat ${content} |\ by $(file --mime-type ${content} | awk '{printf "Content-type: %s\n",$2} ' ; echo ; cat ${content} ) |\ and it work fine, I juste have to figure out how to send binary document, but that shouldn't be a problem. thanks every one for help.


0

Create a cryptographic random number and add it as a parameter in the url (token). Then only show the real page if it's a valid token. Tokens should be store in the database obviously. How safe is it to provide a link within that app generated email to allow his friends to directly respond to the question without having to register on the site? It ...


1

Including a unique identifier or token in each individual e-mail is the best bet. This token should be random, hard to guess, and from a large enough set that randomly entering values will never produce a valid token. These tokens should then be limited in the scope and scale of what they can do. If you limit the users to a single response and ...


2

I would create tokens (Some random hashes or GUID) for each intended user and pass that in the query string to identify the individual users. Kind of like a temporary password. Putting this on the query string is convenient for the user. Making the GUID, or token temporary or for one time use will reduce sharing. Your only concern after this is if your users ...


2

If you're asking whether a generic email provider such as gmail has PCI compliance issues because of what it's users may do, then no. Consider the DSSv3 definition: PCI DSS applies to all entities involved in payment card processing—including merchants, processors, financial institutions, and service providers, as well as all other entities that ...


0

Most brute force attacks now a days use combo lists rather than a password or dictionary attack. A combo list is a users username and their password in this format username:password. They get them through hacking databases with SQL injection, phishing pages, key loggers and even using Google dorks to find website dumps on the net. Take the scenario that you ...


0

Oh my, so many replies. Yes it is possible if your IP address is not shielded. Your IP address is like a telephone number. Your mail server knows your IP address and it can be obtained by a court order if your ISP is reputable. There are several ways to sheild an IP address with varying degree of success.


3

As Tokk said it is possible that your mail account is compromised from some place else but as you said you are using two factor authentication I believe it is more likely your phone is infected. Check your recently installed apps. Look at comments of the app and installation count. Sometimes they make a clone of an app to spread malware. If you find ...


1

Summary: Proving a specific computer sent an email is hard-to-impossible. If all participants are acting in good faith, it can be deduced, but this requires a high level of participation. Details: While positive identification of the source of an email is not automatically possible, based on the following assumptions, it may be possible to deduce it, by ...


4

You should not only focus on your cellphone, as there are other possibilities how this can happen. If a mail is sent from a pc it will also be shown in you GMail App, so this is no evidence that your mobile phone is the root of the mails. Look at your Google Account's recent activity, perhaps your password has been guessed or stolen from somewhere. There ...


0

You could try to send not only the token in the e-mail, but also a cookie associated with the token to the browser. On verification both token and cookie must be presented, so the token can only be used successfully with the browser which requested the password reset.


7

The problem you're running into is that GET is supposed to be both "safe" and "idempotent": that is, calling it isn't supposed to make any change on the server, and calling it many times should have the same effect as calling it once. From a standards standpoint, you should be using a POST to use the token. Obviously, you can't do that from an email. One ...


6

Experts are experts. What an expert says stands in court as long as: He is an expert. The other party cannot provide another expert, who says that the first expert is wrong, and says it in a more convincingly expertish way. In practice, a email will be reputed to have been sent from a given PC if the context makes it a lot more plausible than any ...


1

As already stated, proving who sent the email will be tricky but what about proving your neighbor hacked your wifi? I don't know what you have in place but typically even basic router can track connected devices and sometimes list MAC addresses. The MAC you could compare to your wife's MAC. If you have more advanced router in place and have logs or much more ...



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