New answers tagged

0

Belated answer: Yes. DROPOUTJEEP, MONKEYCALENDAR, PICASSO, TOTEGHOSTLY, WATERWITCH, WARRIOR PRIDE, TRACKER SMURF, etc. are NSA-developed tools whose existence Edward Snowden and others have revealed. MONKEYCALENDAR is software used by law enforcement that transmits a mobile phone's location by hidden text message. TRACKER SMURF provides "high-precision ...


1

This might be a problem without a really good solution. Here are some suggestions. They all fall in two groups - not very effective but practical (1-4) or effective but a bit unpractical (5-6). Limit the amount of time the token is valid. Check that the IP that request the new password and the IP that click the link has the same geolocation. This could ...


2

Send a unique string of text, a.k.a. a token (cryptographically secure, randomly generated), to the user via some other band besides e-mail, such as SMS or even snail mail. They can change their password in your app only if they input that token in a Web form on your site. Or use physical devices, like SmartCards, that all users must have in order to use ...


2

I think that onetimesecret.com it's a very useful service, and it fits your needs. Of course, you should share the onetimesecret password by a different channel in order to increase the security and avoid the case of compromising the sensitive information if someone has access to the email account. I have dealt with these situations before and, depending on ...


1

Where I work we have a solution that will automatically detect sensitive information and replace the content with a link to a secured server. The company that sells this makes a business out of it so this isn't a crazy idea. As long as you make the links impossible to guess (long crypto-secure random strings.) The solution we use actually requires the ...


1

There already is a solution for encrypting email: It's called PGP and there are plugins available for most email programs on most operating systems. Its main problem in the real world is that you need the public key of anyone you are going to send an email to, but when you are using it internally you can fix that by setting up a keyserver on your company ...


6

They are standards for encryption of mails, notable S/MIME and PGP. There is defined how the encrypted message gets encapsulated so that the mail client knows that it is encrypted. These encapsulations have a very specific Content-Type headers or at least specific markers in the content, i.e. markers like -----BEGIN PGP MESSAGE----- or Content-Type's ...


4

Encrypted data should have a relatively uniform distribution of randomness, so if notable portions of it fed through tests such as a chi-squared test don't end up showing as random, then it's unlikely it's encrypted. Since you have multiple messages, close attention to the first bytes of each message is also relevant because it'll give a chance to detect a ...


0

Security of Faxing, should be questioned. Especially if third party fax servers are used. A fax may be sent to a server for multiple distribution or as storage for local display to terminals. These local and remote fax servers may not be encrypted and subject to unauthorized use.


0

I work in Geolocation and do a lot of work resolving questions as to location of devices. To get back to the original question posted: If the police have an email, sent by a suspect over a 3G or 4G network, could they use the IP address (since they know when it was sent) to find out - from the service provider - the precise location the email was sent ...


1

Before the email is sent, you can grab all URLs with a regexp, and then submit them to Googles Safe Browsing API to check if they are known to be malicious. If so, just don't send the email or include a warning.


0

Not sure if helps, but I have used RBL lists for a long in my mail servers and they do a pretty decent job (they take care about 90% - 95% of the spam). It works much better than SpamAssassin (and without hassle). Still, I use SpamAssassin for the rest of the spam. Now, about your specific question: If I understand correctly, what you want is to block ...


2

I am the author of Gmail script that you referenced in the question. The script is now available as a Google-approved add-on on the Chrome Store. It requires access to the entire Gmail because, unfortunately, that's how permissions works inside Google Scripts. You either have full access or no access. In the Gmail Scheduler script, it needs permissions to ...


0

Your local IP address is pretty much useless outside of your network. The only time you need to worry about if someone has your internal IP address is if they also have internal access to your network, either physically or via a Virtual Private Network (VPN). It's very hard to initiate a conversation with a device inside a network from outside the network, ...


0

All previous answers are good with lots of technical details. Yet no one mentions the probabilities that the suspect may use Anonymous Remailer. Though the service itself is a myth in Internet (I never use it myself), it is possible in principle. And there are previous cases against it. In the ideal situation, the suspect may construct a mailing-chain of ...


1

I will shoot in the dark as there is no way to know exactly what can be the reason without further details... Each time you forward those emails like : if you don't send this email to 20 accounts and the person who sent it to you in the next minute, you will be cursed..., spammers will receive a lot of information about you and your contacts (many people ...


2

These are hard to get. Generally, you need to create and curate your own spam trap (hard!) or else get data from some existing spam trap. There are resources for this. See the following highly related questions: Brainstorm: How to quickly create a honeypot for mass spam? Publicly Available Spam Filter Training Set Spear phishing data set Databases ...


0

To have the receiver verify the sender and the message, both parties can agree to use S/MIME certificates. You can purchase these at your internet provider.


0

There are really a couple of things involved here, that probably involve different companies. Firstly there is the originating IP address, usually not a hard problem (at least as far as finding the originating mail server). Most of the better behaved servers will prepend this information in the email header before passing the mail on (There are ways ...


0

Every email message has sender email address in the header as well in the message. The one you can see in email client is the one in message, and there could be anything what is configured in email client on the sender side. The real sender address is only in the header, so if you find out how to view the headers in you email client, there should be real ...


12

Email is a very old plain-text protocol (dating from the 1970s/1980s). Anyone who controls a mail-server can send out mail from their mailserver using any return address (including ones at other domain). SMTP doesn't include any checks that the mail came from a mail server who controlled the domain listed on the From: line. Extensions to email protocols ...


-1

This answer is a little more in the weeds. The exact server you would use to determine where a user is, within the cellular network is called the PGW, or PDN Gateway. This is the server that is used for lawful interception of traffic, it also other information about the every end user on the network, such as billing information. What hasn't been mentioned ...


4

The aim of phishing is to obtain information about the victim, to which the attacker is not entitled. There are two typical ways a phisher would obtain that information: The victim supplies it by including it in a reply to the phishing email, i.e. by sending the information to an email address controlled by the attacker. The victim supplies it by first ...


1

I think you can safely reply the message. A MX record lookup gives outlook.com as top level domain. Also,the top level domain in mscloude@clickdimensions.microsoft.com is microsoft.com. Even if the email is spoofed with clickdimensions.microsoft.com. Your reply email will not be delivered to attacker. Also, just make sure that reply (reply-to) address ...


8

Speaking as a wireless telecom professional, the answer to your question depends on how precise you expect the location to be. With minimal effort (and a legal obligation to do so), I can tell exactly which cellsite(s) you were using, which narrows your location down to a particular geographic area. And we don't even need to know the IP Address, we just ...


2

Well, if he was already a suspect, you wouldn't need the email to begin with. The investigators could have been watching their mobile phone wanderabouts the whole time (or another agency have already put this guy on watch, and thus the mobile has more data about it). The other option is that you have an email, but no idea who the criminal is (for example, ...


0

Around ten years ago it was more likely. Back then, many free website-based e-mail providers (including Yahoo) added the IP address of the machine the e-mail was sent from to the e-mail header. I didn't check what every provider does now, but I would guess most providers now put the IP of their server instead of the sender's machine into the header. if I ...


11

Earlier answers already describe the process of using triangulation to pinpoint the location of a specific phone better than I could describe it. However there is very little said about whether the investigators can figure out which exact phone the mail was sent from. In traditional mail services where the user run an email client on their device and use ...


-2

No, the location is not traced for everyone in logs - unless it's under the watch/hood before. The last resort here - usually, if no previous location trace is enabled - a base stations where the IP-carrying node was active at the moment.


-3

You have plenty of good suggestions here. But at the risk of ruining my script writing career, the most visual scheme to use would be the "silent ping", that is if you want to find the person in real time. I will discuss email as well later in the post. The silent ping takes advantage of a mode of SMS where nothing appears on your phone. The three letter ...


23

There's another common way that email leaks location information. If the email includes a photograph that was taken on a smartphone, the photo will usually have location information embedded. Since you're writing the story, you might contrive to have the sender email a photo for some reason. The JPEG standard (used for virtually all mobile phone photos) ...


19

In addition to what @schroeder wrote, I would like to point out a few things about geolocation. Among other things, a CDR (Call Detail Record) contains information about the cell tower used by the mobile phone at the time. Note that a cell tower can cover an area of about one square mile, or more. In some countries, mobile operators might always be able to ...


43

If the police have an email, sent by a suspect over a 3G or 4G network, could they use the IP address (since they know when it was sent) to find out - from the service provider - the precise location the email was sent from? Yes, this is very easy. However... the key word here is "precise location." Not exactly. Not unless the phone is hacked. ...


54

The problem with this scenario is that emails are typically not sent from the device itself, but from a central service. In order to do what you want, the investigators would have to make a few hops: to the email service (gets the user account details, including the IP the user used to connect with) to the ISP the device used at the time of sending (gets ...


0

Another solution which guarantees the peace of mind is a prepaied "credit" card. This way you can never be charged more than you've put in. Depending on the card, you may also save foreign exchange fees. Both Mastercard and visa issues these, but they're probably easier to get from third-party organisations.


9

Ask your credit card provider for a one-time card number. Or get a new account with a low limit. Put the credit card number (and maybe a short random string) in a plain text file. 7zip this file with AES encryption. Email the hotel with this file as an attachment. Phone them and tell them the password to decrypt the file. (You might have to do a bit of ...


2

It's quite common for hotels to pre authorise payment using your card details. This is to prove you are who you say you are and check you have sufficient funds for your stay. Although emailing may not be the safest way of sending your credit card details. Perhaps a phone call would be better but still not "secure" What I would suggest is that you opt to ...


6

Your question appears to have nothing to do with certificates or hashes. Neither one involve symmetric ciphers (like DES or AES) at all. The actual answer is just a matter of how Outlook (or Mail.app) is configured on each machine, nothing more. I don't know how to control the ciphers used on Outlook for Mac, but here are the steps for Outlook 2013 on ...


6

My guess is that you have Avast Mail Shield active and therefore it will scan any incoming and outgoing messages. This is probably done by being a man in the middle, i.e. your mail client actually connects to a local process from Avast which then connects to the real mail server. This means the internet access is necessary to actually get the mails from the ...


3

Email servers store all mails they forward in cleartext. That means you must trust your email service provider to not snoop on you. An automatic forwarder is not necessary to do that. There are other ways to forward the content of your emails without using email. Also, all email tracking solutions depend on cooperation of the email reader. Most email readers ...


4

Generally, it is ill-advised to implementing your own session handling. If you can, you would be better off by using a well known and well tested implementation. These are the issues I see in your procedure. User requests password reset How will you handle misuse of this function - will you send one email per reset attempt, or will you implement a ...



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