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There are no specific risks associated with plain text attachments as defined by the RFC. Ref: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2046 Operating systems like Windows associate the "txt" extension of the file-name to the text/plain MIME type and have executable association on-click/open with some defined program (like notepad/wordpad, etc). By default on most ...


1

It's also possible that all attachment's are being blocked - regardless of extension. Or, there may be an organizational policy that permits only certain file types - maybe only .pdf has been approved, and so .txt is explicitly blocked. While not necessarily a security issue, there is the possibility that someone could send a lot of very large .txt files ...


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In addition to makerofthings7's very thorough answer, another reason could be to prevent phishing attacks which tunnel dangerous content in the TXT attachment. For example, if you send a file called ILOVEYOU.EXE.TXT, sign it as "grandma", and instruct the user to save and rename the file - some percentage of users will happily follow those instructions to ...


7

I've been supporting and administering email for 18 years, and never had a valid reason to block text attachments. Here are some issues that I can think of, that aren't exclusive to TXT attachments alone, but rather regard attachments in general Unicode parsing The only two issues I've come across is this unicode bug but it's theoretically possible that ...



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