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31

You don't need to find out how they got your IP - the entire Internet is constantly being scanned by malicious individuals, bots etc. If you have an FTP server on the Internet, one of these scans will find it and a whole series of attack attempts will commence. Your downside is - you can't secure an FTP server. FTP just wasn't designed to provide encryption ...


16

Another thing you can do is add an iptables 'bruteforce' rule. This will allow ip's to make NEW connections x times within y seconds. After these limits have been reached the packets will be dropped. This prevents brute-forces from continuously attacking your server. I have such protection on common scanned ports like FTP, SSH, IMAP, POP3, SMTP, etc.... ...


15

There are lots of programs trawling the internet looking for vulnerable hosts. Certainly there are people who target their attacks - but starting from torrent logs will not yield very interesting targets. Have a look at the sans.org site for basic checklists on securing your server.


4

The real key here is to avoid having significant PHP code in a location where it would be downloaded even by accident. The ideal scenario would be that the page that your users request is a minimal index page with as little PHP code as possible, who's sole function is to include other PHP scripts that are in a directory outside the web-accessible area. ...


3

Syslog contains errors or application logs. You will find php logs, restarts of programs... lshw will return what hardware you are running in a very detailed way. lsusb will return info about your usb device and it's driver. lspci will give some more info about attached pci devices. It's basic trouble shooting really, they want to know when you insert ...


2

I think you may find that this question is so huge in function and scope that you won't find such definitive lists (though I'd also love to see one.) Publicly, you are more likely to find mean-(time-to or between)-failure of hardware than for software simply because physical engineering will be concerned with those figures during the life-cycle. Of course, ...


2

The only way that PHP source could be presented to the user is if a server configuration was off. A browser can only get access to the information presented to it by the web server and the web server should be having PHP process a PHP script and returning the result. If the PHP script was sent to the browser, then the server configuration was off. What ...


2

Whilst the answer given by AaronS gets to the gist of it (rather harshly if I may say so), I think the general principle that applies to any secure solution is defence-in-depth. That is, using several layers of security to prevent against attack, compromise or data leakage. I'm not going to go into the debate of what percentage of attacks/leaks are ...


1

This seems to be a problem with your server, not Safari. Some servers will default to sending the PHP file to the browser to be downloaded if they cannot parse the PHP code. If this happened only once, I'd think it is maybe a small bug in your PHP interpreter, but if this is happening very much, I'd recommend updating your PHP, or checking with your host if ...



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