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158

I interpret your question as: What's the motivation for someone to use an alien Facebook account to play poker and stock it with chips? It's not that strange if you think about it this way: As poker is a game where knowledge about the dealt cards gives you a significant edge in the game, you'd like to use sock puppets at a table to know more about the ...


64

To me it seems as if someone is doing fraud from your account. They load your FB with money (from a stolen credit card). Lose at poker so the money goes to another FB account. Withdraw that with an anonymous prepaid credit card. There are lots of different ways of doing carding (fraud). I'd contact FB and maybe the police as you might get a loud knock on ...


32

OP has clarified that this is Zynga Poker, in which no real money changes hands. That being the case, the most likely reasons for a fraudster to put money into your mother's account is that this scamp has acquired/purchased a block of PayPal account details and is systematically testing them to see if they work by hacking into Facebook accounts and using ...


8

It's also entirely possible that the entire thing is a confidence scam. In this type of scam, someone gives you some money to let people engage in high-risk behavior (e.g. gambling), and the victim plays increasingly high-risk bets until, at some point, the other players at the victim's table (in reality, an assistant or bot ('shills'?) of the con artist) ...


6

From the first paragraph of the link you've provided: As a result, apps that don't support SHA-2 certificate signatures will no longer be able to connect to Facebook starting on October 1, 2015. I would read this differently to your interpretation. This is not a requirement to the apps to have certificates signed with SHA-2 but it is a requirement to ...


5

It is almost certain that whatever you do, your data will not be irrevocably destroyed. Even if the organisation you trusted with your personal data had the best of intentions it would be an enormous effort to really physically delete all of your data from all the places it will have been duplicated to, including backups and SSD spare sectors. No ...


5

We don't know what security measures Facebook exactly provides but spoofing the source IP of a TCP connection (which is used when accessing a web site) and still doing something useful with the connection is impossible in practice. This means that it is more likely that the site was really accessed from the shown IP address (no spoofing), that the database ...


5

Go through the apps you gave some permission on facebook. Especially the "post on my behalf" permission. Remove any you don't trust (or don't remember giving them permissions). Anyway, it might be a one time thing, and there is nothing to get rid of. Read through this blog post for more information. In the extreme case, you might be indeed infected by ...


4

There are several possibilities here: A tab in Firefox has a website that keeps connecting and refreshing an internal IP address. That might be a home NAS appliance that by coincidence has the same IP with your computer A Javascript script from a legitimate website attempts to scan the internal network using Cross Origin Requests or WebSockets. This ...


4

Update May 2015: Facebook now uses HSTS. Good work. $ http -h get https://www.facebook.com Strict-Transport-Security: max-age=15552000; preload See also https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=facebook.com


4

If as you mention the "hacker" chatted with you via the Facebook website, then all you will get is the IP of a Facebook server somewhere in the cloud, which won't help you much. Only Facebook could get you the sender IP, and I don't believe they would disclose such information. Moreover, the attacker probably used at least one proxy, which would make ...


3

does it mean all previews are sent from FB server? Or the link is embedded from the source? When you share a page on social media, the platform (in this case Facebook) pulls in certain information from the embedded webpage, including the title, author information, page summary, and often an image. More information can be specified in the html header in ...


3

It's entirely possible that this has no bearing on your own devices or settings. Let's talk about the way one could go about designing that feature: Consider all connections one or two steps away. From those who have enabled syncing their contacts, consider those with a fuzzily matched name. Factored with some other heuristic scoring, you start seeing ...


2

It is true that bearer tokens and session tokens should not be passed int he url. The reasons are (according to OWASP): might disclose the session ID (in web links and logs, web browser history and bookmarks, the Referer header or search engines) In this specific case, I think Facebook did not care since the usage is logout - so after it has been ...


2

Without an official statement from Facebook how these posts were made, we can only speculate. Many organizations which use Facebook professionally for social media campaigns, like election campaign offices of politicians, do not use Facebook directly but use software tools to post content. Such tools can be configured to schedule a time and date when a ...


2

It looks like the IPv6 address of the machine that connected. It is made up of eight groups of four hexadecimal digits. You can search for the owner of the network and inform the ISP of that network. There are many but http://ip-lookup.net will search for info about IPv6 addresses. Update: I ran a lookup on my own address and got better results with ...


2

The only reason I can think of for which this procedure can make sense is to prevent someone who has physical access to your computer/smartphone from logging in the site. Given that the Facebook session is usually opened for most users, anyone with access to the computer/smartphone of these users could get access to the site, impersonating them. If you ...


2

We do not know how Facebook implements security internally, so we can only guess. But common best-practices regarding admin authentication is to use the IP address as an additional authentication factor, but not the only one. For example, it would not be uncommon to only allow admins to connect from specific IP addresses which were authorized for this, but ...


2

As far as I'm aware, Facebook don't actually block the new attempts from different IPs. Instead, they send an email to the registered email address with a notification that you logged into a new device, with a button to mark this as legitimate or malicious. The tracking appears to work not only via your IP, but also a long-term identification cookie and ...


1

The first answer that pops to my head is money laundering. The hacker would just transfer the cash to their facebook account via playing extremely bad. I think, the reason why the 3rd party account needed to be hacked is Germany's gambling legislation. As far as I know, Germany has strict gambling regulations. It's probably forbidden by law to play ...


1

Just hand your evidence over to law enforcement and facebook. There is nothing more you should do; I strongly recommend not trying to be a vigilante. Cross reference the linked question for more information. Additionally, you may not hold your breath on catching a hacker. They are likely to have taken good precausions. Also, there is a fair chance that ...


1

In theory, you could have caught a drive by download. However, it is much more likely that you have been redirected to an advertisement page and the respective owner now rejoices about the revenue of all the sheeps clicking on funny looking links ;-) You can delete your cookies to get rid of any tracking/advertisement ones and I generally recommend ...


1

As you said, the main threats on Facebook are the ads and malicious links/files users can share between each other. In terms of Ads, you can use an ad-blocker such as uBlock Origin or AdBlock, which as the name suggest will remove any side-bar ads. In terms of not clicking malicious/suspicious links, well, that's down to the user, as long as they are well ...


1

If your account is active, deactivated or in remembrance mode after your death, it stores all your data indefinitely. If you delete your account the information should be deleted within 90 days. When you delete your account, people won't be able to see it on Facebook. It may take up to 90 days to delete all of the things you've posted, like your photos, ...


1

Large companies like Google and Facebook have a reputation to lose. Considering their scale of operation, there is not much to gain by breaking into the account of some user on some other website. But should they do it and get caught, it would be quite a scandal which would severely hurt their reputation and make their users question their trustworthiness. ...


1

Why should [Facebook and other large companies] get the status of trusted parties? Anybody can be a trusted party simply by trusting them to provide account authorization. For these large companies, they're common authorization servers because it's simple and generally the world is trusting them to maintain security over accounts. An employee or ...


1

I found a way to remove it. Chrome options - more tools - task manager Find "Merry christmas" - end process Chrome options - Extensious - remove "Merry christmas"


1

No, because Facebook relays the information to you. I ran a test two months ago by creating a webpage that would send me an email each time it was visited. Immediately after posting the link as a status, with privacy set to "Only me", I received the email with an IP address from Facebook and not my own. It's likely they do this to avoid exposing users out ...


1

The site works (most likely- I haven't visited it either) by requesting YOUR permissions to see and record what YOU do. It then looks in its database to see if your friends also use it- if they do, it can show you what THEY have done. It can't show you what anyone who is not a member of their site is doing, which is why it is so insistent that you get your ...


1

Ideally you should not. If they have successfully authenticated through another means, don't impose further burdens on them. You can see that this method is used by the Stack Exchange network (for example) - after you have authenticated through Google, you don't have to create a password.



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