New answers tagged

1

If you've always used that Facebook account through Tor, and never through your normal connection, and the Facebook account is for an anonymous identity rather than your real identity and you never make any references using your real identity to your alter ego and vice versa, and you never login, then using Facebook over Tor does not necessarily compromise ...


1

It depends. Facebook analyzes the locations from which you use to login from. Depending on where your new IP is located, Facebook may, or may not, give you access to your account. In the case Facebook finds the new location suspicious, it will use another mean to validate your identity. (E.g. an email to validate your attempt.) Once you validate that new ...


2

As far as I'm aware, Facebook don't actually block the new attempts from different IPs. Instead, they send an email to the registered email address with a notification that you logged into a new device, with a button to mark this as legitimate or malicious. The tracking appears to work not only via your IP, but also a long-term identification cookie and ...


0

So let me answer this in two ways: by the addressing the part of the situation that your attention is on (understandably; it's an amusing/interesting little scenario) and then addressing part of the situation where you're/our attention probably should be. What do I mean by that? Well, what I mean by that is that there are not one but at least two questions ...


1

So, someone bought a hacked FaceBook account, set up a custom fake PayPal account in the name of the hacked account, gave the hacked account poker chips, and posted ads about their game to FaceBook as that account. I see two possible reasons to do this. 1) On the face of it, the only entity which benefits from this is Zynga, which gets advertising, and if ...


1

The first answer that pops to my head is money laundering. The hacker would just transfer the cash to their facebook account via playing extremely bad. I think, the reason why the 3rd party account needed to be hacked is Germany's gambling legislation. As far as I know, Germany has strict gambling regulations. It's probably forbidden by law to play ...


32

OP has clarified that this is Zynga Poker, in which no real money changes hands. That being the case, the most likely reasons for a fraudster to put money into your mother's account is that this scamp has acquired/purchased a block of PayPal account details and is systematically testing them to see if they work by hacking into Facebook accounts and using ...


8

It's also entirely possible that the entire thing is a confidence scam. In this type of scam, someone gives you some money to let people engage in high-risk behavior (e.g. gambling), and the victim plays increasingly high-risk bets until, at some point, the other players at the victim's table (in reality, an assistant or bot ('shills'?) of the con artist) ...


64

To me it seems as if someone is doing fraud from your account. They load your FB with money (from a stolen credit card). Lose at poker so the money goes to another FB account. Withdraw that with an anonymous prepaid credit card. There are lots of different ways of doing carding (fraud). I'd contact FB and maybe the police as you might get a loud knock on ...


158

I interpret your question as: What's the motivation for someone to use an alien Facebook account to play poker and stock it with chips? It's not that strange if you think about it this way: As poker is a game where knowledge about the dealt cards gives you a significant edge in the game, you'd like to use sock puppets at a table to know more about the ...


4

If as you mention the "hacker" chatted with you via the Facebook website, then all you will get is the IP of a Facebook server somewhere in the cloud, which won't help you much. Only Facebook could get you the sender IP, and I don't believe they would disclose such information. Moreover, the attacker probably used at least one proxy, which would make ...


1

Just hand your evidence over to law enforcement and facebook. There is nothing more you should do; I strongly recommend not trying to be a vigilante. Cross reference the linked question for more information. Additionally, you may not hold your breath on catching a hacker. They are likely to have taken good precausions. Also, there is a fair chance that ...



Top 50 recent answers are included