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All of the above posts are correct in that you need to trust the third party in order to safely use external js resources. The only thing I would add on to that is make sure that you are accessing those resources over SSL and that it's an up-to-date implementation (proper cipher suite, TLS v1, etc). If you are going to trust the third party, SSL is needed ...


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This has more to do with risk management. You do not have any contract with Facebook or Twitter. So you have a risk that they may change the contents of the JavaScript file without you knowing. This can be malicious or accidental, either way you have no control of this risk. So unless you get a contract with the external party which moves the liability to ...


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Hosting locally will not prevent them from doing anything malicious. In this case, if you are importing a JavaScript file from external source, into your page, you will have to 100% trust the JavaScript as this script will be executed within your own origin. Hosting them locally might provide some advantage in case the source you trusted is compromise. The ...


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As a countermeasure against phishing emails. Such emails will look like legit email asking you to change or update your password, but their link will direct you to a false website (still looking as legit as possible, with URL such as micr0s0ft.com: here the letter 'O' was replaced by zeros '0', it looks like "microsoft.com" but it is not "microsoft.com") ...


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In order to delete the HSTS settings for specific browsers, use the following procedures: Firefox 1. In the URL field, type: about:permissions 2. In the left pane, search for facebook.com 3. Click "Forget About This Site" Chrome 1. In the URL field, type: chrome://net-internals/#hsts 2. In the delete section type facebook.com and click delete Safari ...


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I want to highlight some points in response to your question and according to my best knowledge. Anyhow to give a more appropriate answer, need your question more specific. In both cases 1) The risk factor remains everywhere. Even if something has 0.1 percent chance of bad happening, it might happen... “Risk theory” 2) Facebook is a huge company with ...


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If they keep coming back, it means that you have some software running checks on them. You should take some tool to analyze the running processes on your machine. Use Process Explorer to look at the current running processes (so that you can find out which one is recreating the reported keys and Autoruns to check the list of programs initiated ...


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Token expiration may take place on the server side causing the client to reauth after x time. If youre looking to do social logins this method should be fine as long as youre transmitting the data over SSL and not saving credentials (U/P Combos) on your systems. The login endpoint should be running on HTTPS (again, read, secure) and should be connecting to ...



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