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No, it is not at least with OpenSSH -- there are no options to operate in this mode. It is for authenticating with remote servers (validating identity) and then encrypting the network traffic between ssh client application and the remote sshd server. You could try compiling a library from OpenSSH that uses its encryption modes and create an executable ...


2

Here is what I have done, and still do in some specific cases: I use a machine with no swap. In my case, an old Asus EeePC with the famously horrendous proto-SSD; you really do not want to use it for swap space. Instead, I replaced the RAM chip, up to 2 GB. I configure /tmp to be a RAM-based filesystem (search for "tmpfs" in the man page for "mount"). When ...


0

If recognizable data patterns in the plaintext do somehow weaken your symmetric encryption, then your symmetric encryption is pure junk and should not be used at all. Do not make your data format inconvenient and complex just to cope with the (assumed) shortcomings of the encryption algorithm; instead, use an algorithm which does things properly. It is ...


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In the UK the police can force you to reveal encryption keys. There have been a handful of cases of people jailed purely for refusing to reveal their key. I think the UK is somewhat unusual in this regard, but you would have to check your local laws. Of course, if revealing your key implicated you in something serious (like mass murder) you would do best to ...


1

1.They can't guarantee it's what it's said to be if they can't retain the original binary data that makes up the evidence of the accusation. In such a case, they could never charge anyone without proof, and if they can't decrypt it, they can't prove anything. Assuming that any confiscated or eavesdropped data is encrypted in a secure way, there is ...


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It depends on what security features you are looking for; specifically, how much you mistrust your own computer. If you just need the decryption key to reside on a USB device, then you can put a key file on a basic USB flash drive, and use GnuPG. The key will of course make it to the main computer, because the computer will do the actual decryption work. ...


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It's been nine days with no other answers, so I'll put in this poor attempt. As a note, your references to both "master key" and "master password" are a bit confusing. Start by looking at the john-dev mailing list entry on FileVault cracking; in particular, that post lists VileFault which may be of some use to you, and Openciphers appears to have an FPGA ...



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