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The answers to the linked question give a very good overview of why quantum computers break modern encryption schemes (RSA and Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC)), but not how to mitigate against it. Summary: expect it to take until ~ 2020 to work the kinks out of post-quantum algorithms - Use AES-256 for now! As mentioned in Thomas Pornin's answer to the ...


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The green folders are encrypted, the locked folders are locked to the user only(possibly password protected, but not encrypted). A quick google search for folder with lock icons windows 10 shows that they can only be accessed by you, and not anyone else. Green on the other hand means actually encrypted. A simple test: Send the peglocked folder to someone ...


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It depends on how EFS is set up, and what version of NTFS you're using. For the purposes of this question, I'm going to presume a modern version of NTFS (i.e. >=3.0) on a modern operating system like Windows 8.1 or 10. In a single-user environment outside of a domain, by default, files are encrypted in a 3-stage process. First, a random File Encryption Key ...


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Yes, if an attacker can crack your local password hash they can log in as you and have the same access to your encrypted files. You could export your EFS cert and private key to a PFX file protected with a separate password that would be harder to crack, but this would mean deleting it from your local key store when not in use and then importing it again ...


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No, there isn't. S3's encryption services are for the data at rest inside, not outside, S3.


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You can create deniable encryption using dm-crypt and remote header or raw dm-crypt encryption and block device offsets (1, 2). It's not as easy as TrueCrypt though and it's extremely ready to get wrong, as dm-crypt is a very low level tool, but you have more control and flexibility.


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Legal note: That depends on what you expect to achieve with plausible deniability: This can bite you in the ass in several countries (like the UK, for example.) The police there know of the existence of TrueCrypt, and under the RIPA Act (and similar legislation elsewhere), they may fine and/or imprison you if you do not provide the decryption key to all ...


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If you are supplying the application that stores and retrieves the encrypted files for the user, here are a few ideas you may want to consider... 1) Rather than encrypting data at the cloud storage, consider encrypting the data files prior to storing in the cloud service. You can find numerous options for encryption libraries on GitHub. 2) Store the Keys ...



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