New answers tagged

1

As tylerl and user80945 already said, using EncFS in a Dropbox is not secure. More information can be found in this article. An alternative would be CryFS. It is a new open source project that doesn't have the security vulnerabilities of EncFS, and also encrypts the metadata (e.g. file sizes and directory structure). Disclaimer: I'm one of the developers ...


2

Well, either someone's playing a bad joke, or something is infected. Your best bet is to hire an expert or ask on a forum dedicated to that kind of thing, like Bleepingcomputer, and then do EXACTLY what they tell you to do, without deviation. Other than that, if you're worried about it spreading, turn everything off. Then on a fresh, new, clean PC (or ...


4

You've been hit by a virus, possibly a ransomware. The way to proceed depends on the kind of virus, but in general you must use an antivirus to check all your machines, and be ready to wipe out the infected ones and restore data from backups. If you receive a ransom request, it would be wiser to not pay it. Related question: Getting files back by paying ...


-3

Do the following: a full boot scan using an AV rescue disk Like Kaspersky or Node32 check all clients startup and check System Directories Like TEMP folder check processes using a Process Explorer apps delete junk apps if files are important, call an expert to attempt to reverse engineer the encryption


1

First and foremost rolling your own crypto is almost always a bad idea see Why shouldn't we roll our own?. Now that that requirement is out of the way lets take a look at your question. In this case you have to ask what are you protecting against. The AES encryption (assuming that it is implemented correctly and there are no side channels) will protect ...


0

Encrypted files/drives/partitions are designed so its content appears random without a decrypt and to be at best hack resistant if not proof [ see Truecrypt entry in Wikipedia for all the tricks it includes] whereas RAR was mainly designed to compresses or container files for distribution with security as a secondary concern. For example, RAR can leave ...


1

There are actually two parts to this question. First, the minimum size of the encrypted message will be much larger than a single bit. This is done to prevent the scenario you describe. See this question for details. Second, here's an explanation of why decryption (or determining the private key) won't be any easier, even if you know the public key, the ...


1

Don't upload the private key to the server. Instead, send the encrypted shared key to the user. The user can then decrypt with the private key, which stays on the user's system. Then, the user sends the decrypted shared key to the server.


1

For part two, you can do sensibly better: (The session between User and System is encrypted) User starts a task that requires an encrypted file System sends tne encrypted shared key User locally decrypts the shared key User sends the decrypted shared key (stays only in memory) System decrypts the file into memory System deletes the decrypted shared key ...


1

Unfortunately all the slick methods of Full Disk Encryption are all native to the OS, and so only available on that OS, so if you need cross-platform support you have to use a more nerdy solution like GPG. In my experience the easiest way to achieve something like this usually ends up, as Matthew suggests, to be an encrypted zip file. You can find plenty of ...


2

Most encryption software like bitlocker or Truecrypt will offer you to overwrite the space that's left with random bytes, resulting in the file being deleted. Another option is using a fileshredder. Look for any shredder using the Gutmann method



Top 50 recent answers are included