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pCloud Transfer is also a good option. It is a simple system for securely transferring files between two parties. The files get temporarily stored in the "cloud" but you can be sure that they will be unreadable to anyone who doesn't know the password you have to provide your recipient with. It's free and requires no registration to use it. I've been using ...


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stackexchange. This question can't be answered by security experts; you need to contact the person who generated the encrypted file and/or learn how to use Kruptos 2. This site isn't for supporting how to use specific applications like Kruptos 2. The extension of .~enc tells little by itself. enc is a common extension for encrypted files, but ~enc ...


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That's a judgment call you'll have to make for yourself, but their technical overview has what I consider a huge red flag: Which data is stored on the Boxcryptor Key Server Private RSA key (encrypted with the user's password) The fact that your private key is stored on their server, even if it's encrypted with your password, greatly ...


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Very unreasonable. The first question I think you need to ask is if file encryption is necessary. Based on your question it sounds like the answer is yes. To me that means that you A) should implement file encryption and B) do it well. What you describe is A but not B which is arguably worse than nothing at all because it may give your users a false ...


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Why on earth you would use Windows 7 for this task is beyond my comprehension. Anybody with a Linux USB drive could boot, and then mount your Windows partition and pull files from it. Well known trick. You could encrypt your entire hard drive but with TrueCrypt potentially compromised that might not be a completely safe bet. Never let the computer you are ...


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Yes, it's possible, but you need to protect the entire computer, rather than a single folder. It's also a lot harder than you think, and probably not necessary. Network attacks: Do your development on a system that is not, has never, and will never be directly connected to a network. Remove any wireless or bluetooth adapters from the system to prevent ...


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No. Consider that when you're using a computer, you're just interacting with software that's reading and writing these files. Anything your intended software can do, malicious software can do. That being said, you could use Trusted Boot, Full Disk Encryption, and run only signed/verified software on your machine. Using an air-gapped (never connected to ...


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You can also use this shell script. Source: http://synacl.wordpress.com/2012/08/18/decrypting-a-zip-using-john-the-ripper/ #!/bin/bash echo "ZIP-JTR Decrypt Script"; if [ $# -ne 2 ] then echo "Usage $0 <zipfile> <wordlist>"; exit; fi unzip -l $1 for i in $(john --wordlist=$2 --rules --stdout) do echo -ne "\rtrying \"$i\" " unzip -o -P $i $1 ...



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