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Encrypting the pagefile implies you're wanting to protect against someone taking the file after gaining physical access, which is best dealt with by whole disk encryption. If an attacker has access while the os is in operation, the pagefile is neat to go through for historical purposes but otherwise juicier targets abound. If the purpose is to clean tracks ...


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Those are all secure choices with regards to the algorithm. AES has a 16 byte block size and has been the most scrutinized (as Rijndael won the AES competition). It's also most likely to be well optimized or implemented in hardware. So that's why it should generally be the preferred option.


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As @whoami mentioned, it does just move the issue to another place. As you mentioned it allows you to move it out of code (if you've hardcoded it), password protect it (if it was originally just a PEM or whatever on disk), and ACL it to the requisite permissions. The problem is that you do need to know the key to unlock it, and that of course requires ...


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I feel compelled to offer some caveats because there are probably others reading this out of curiosity: The OP did not make reference to his country of residence, so I will assume that he is in the USA for the legal questions. Any encryption should be used under the assumption that it is not a foolproof security mechanism and can be breached by anyone, ...


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There are a few ways to do this. You can come down to the following statement: For authentication you can only use something the user knows, has or is. As you're in a file-encryption scenario, this should rule out most points concerning "what a user is", because they involve biometrical data, which needs to have tolerances. A password or passphrase. ...



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