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well wiping free space is best if you already normally deleted the file and therefore have no pinpoint left to make a pinpoint wipe (aka erase just the file completely) The good thing is that if you are going to do disk wipe for any reason, you essentially can just normally delete anything else you want to lose (e.g. temp copies etc.) and then do the ...


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You could grab important files as suggested. For example, web.config files or other application configuration files may contain sensitive information such as passwords. You could also try grabbing the SAM and SYSTEM files - the only trouble is that these will almost certainly be locked. In that case you could grab the backups from the repair folder. See ...


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What you describe can be called an information disclosure vulnerability. You could use this technique as a method of fingerprinting (looking for specific operating system files, common web framework folders and files, etc.) and could prove useful in identifying a version of something on the system that is susceptible to a separate vulnerability. As you've ...


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There's the sdelete CLI utility from Microsoft Sysinternals: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/sdelete.aspx You can use SDelete both to securely delete existing files, as well as to securely erase any file data that exists in the unallocated portions of a disk (including files that you have already deleted or encrypted). SDelete ...



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