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2

A file extension is just part of the name and by itself says nothing about the content of the file. It is only used by the OS and applications to decide what to do with the file. Thus if you have no component in your system which uses the extension for deciding what to do with the file than the extension does not matter at all and you will neither need a ...


1

With experience in the computer forensic field the short answer is Yes. As other people said it's called EXIF data. You can get information such as camera settings and lens used, time and date etc. On some newer camera models GPS tagging is available. Also all new smartphones have gps on them. Meaning when the photo is taken the GPS coordinates go in the ...


3

Modern Smart phones embed GPS coordinates into pictures. http://www.howtogeek.com/211427/how-to-see-exactly-where-a-photo-was-taken-and-keep-your-location-private/ This is often how sought out individuals are found and detained because they take photos with their phones unaware the photo contains the location as well. It all depends on the ...


-6

As a programmer, the answer is simply put: "No." Video files do not contain executable code. Even if they did, Windows is very different from Linux in design. The two use different binary formats for the OS that are incompatible. What exploits work on Windows normally won't work on Linux. The only thing that a tampered video file could do is trip a bug ...


10

Yes, VLC can be hacked. Here you can check CVE list of VLC. But don't panic, just because your VLC freeze, that doesn't necessarily ​mean that someone hacked you. Make sure that your VLC is up to date. Can you submit that file to this website Cuckoo Sandbox and then paste the report here, just out of curiosity let us see, what will heppen when that file is ...


19

Video files by themselves can not contain a "virus" in the classical sense but they can be used to exploits bugs in the media players (or sometimes even the OS) when handling the file formats and codecs. By using these exploits they can then execute code. Like most video players vlc also has/had lots of bugs which could be exploited, including in the ...


5

The attack listed in the referenced question certainly would not work with VLC or Linux. VLC does not support the obscure Windows Media Player DRM it utilizes (at least not to my knowledge), and even if it did, the purpose of the attack is to trick you into downloading and running some Windows executable files. That being said, a different kind of attack is ...


2

You can use Apache Tika and create your own program to extract metadata, it is pretty easy to do and here is a tutorial on how to do that. As the other answer says there is no surefire way to extract metadata from every type of file but Tika covers an alright amount.


1

The Unix/Linux file command will extract a lot of metadata inside files, and if you are using Windows, you can install cygwin to gain access to that command. Some example output: C:\Users\stewmark\ScreenShots>file *.png ChangePW.png: PNG image data, 1167 x 1046, 8-bit/color RGB, non-interlaced ChangePW_link.png: PNG image ...


3

Where metadata is stored will be up to the OS and the file that created it (as you say about Notepad and Word docs). Some file types even create a separate file just to hold the metadata. Because of #1, there is no free "give me all the metadata" tool. There are tools that can find the metadata of a wide range of well-known file types, though. Because of ...



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