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In SSH, you have two sets of key pairs: one for the server and one for the users. The server key pair is mandatory but it is typically generated during the installation of the server: all you have to do is validate the server public key fingerprint (a simple hash) and, as long as the key is unchanged, your client will silently connect. The key pair you use ...


7

Short answer: there is necessarily a public/private key pair on the server. There may be a public/private key pair on the client, but the server may elect to authenticate clients with passwords instead, SSH is a generic tunnel mechanism, in which some "application data" is transferred. One such application is the "remote shell" which is used to obtain an ...


4

It's able to function because the keypair already exists on the server. The SSH server has the keys necessary to protect the information in transit. SSH server will use a public key, that client device uses the public key to encrypt information sent to the server. The server then uses its private key to decrypt that information and process. See ...


3

Obviously allowing users to upload any file types is very dangerous Anything a user uploads is just 0s and 1s until you actually decide to do something with it. Executing such files would be a bad idea, yes. Executable programs don't automatically run unless you tell them to, though. If you are wondering about the autorun behavior of certain storage ...


0

No, its not inherently bad to store a malicious file, as long as no one can execute it. Anti-virus softwares do this all the time when they "quarantine" malware. Another possible problem that you can highlight to them is that a malicious user can upload illegal content on their service, for example, someone can upload child pornography there and it will ...



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