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For Firefox, Go to the url bar, type about:config and press enter. Type browser.urlbar.filter.javascript in the Search bar and you will see the following: Double click on the True value to turn it to False. Done! Hope this helps.


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You shouldn't trust the Firefox password manager because the master password is damn inconvenient to use. I've tried it, and after some days, each time I saw the annoying modal master password box each time the firefox crashed or was restarted has just become painful. I guarantee you that any normal user would quickly disable it, and you can do nothing to ...


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Why not save the password in the browser: Because it makes it easier for attackers. If the site has an XSS or similar vulnerability they can steal your password. You install a bad plugin/... it can steal your password directly. The same is true if a legitimate plugin has a security hole used by an attacker. Getting it from a different process is much more ...


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How trustworthy? Good enough for most purposes, and better than using the same password everywhere. Your data is encrypted Your Firefox Sync data is encrypted, and the encryption key remains on devices you control. Mozilla's servers only see the encrypted data and do not have access to the key. If they were hacked or served a government order, it is only ...


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To answer your first question: the main reason you might not want to use the built in password manager for Firefox, or any given browser, is more to do with potential accessibility than security. By using KeePass with the appropriate browser add-in to gain access to that KeePass you may use a single KeePass vault to store all your passwords and gain access ...


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The reason you might not want to trust Firefox is that you can get the usability and security benefits of using a password manager without trusting Firefox (or any cloud provider). As RobM points out, there a risk that Firefox can be compelled to turn over the data you send to them. There's also a risk that someone will break into their servers. Firefox ...


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I agree with RobM. So it would be possible that they share everything they know about me with (american) governmental organizations. Yes, very possible. Are there even alternative browsers which wouldn't do this? The Onion Router. There may be others. Even Firefox will work this way if you use local syncing, and disable malware and phishing ...


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To me, trustworthiness doesn't necessarily require a claim that an organisation will never disclose your details. Rather it means that any claims made should be honest. As a business, Firefox can be compelled by the governments of any countries it operates in to conform with their laws. An organisation that acknowledges this and clearly explains their ...


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HSTS, the HTTP Strict Transport Security mechanism, is defined by RFC 6797. The relevant section is section 12.1, No User Recourse, which states (in part) that (my emphasis): Failing secure connection establishment on any warnings or errors (per Section 8.4 ("Errors in Secure Transport Establishment")) should be done with "no user recourse". This ...


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Why do Firefox and Chrome allow such easy leaking of these session keys? To make it easier for developers to analyze their network captures. The first time I used this feature was when trying to understand what protocol is exactly used by the web-based noVNC. Using this functionality, I was able to decrypt the traffic in Wireshark. I read some ...



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