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Adding new software always increases risk. It must be balanced against any benefits you might receive from the use of it, how sensitive the data it might be able to access, and how "risky" you think the software is. When I speak of software riskiness, I mean how good the programming practices are of the group that wrote it. Often in larger organizations they ...


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Yes, the more components you have on any process, the more room for vulnerabilities. In the case of browser extensions, some of them have permission to read all your history, cookies, navigation data and even change code on the pages you access. Some of them don't have vulnerabilities, but are design to inject malicious code. AdBlock and NoScript are ...


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If their encryption is indeed secure, it would ensure that anyone who can eavesdrop on your connection between you and their server will not be able to find out what you are doing. This is a very big if because they don't provide any details on their FAQ about what algorithms they are using and how they use them. Their FAQ only mentions "our proprietary ...


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If ping is returning an unwanted IP address for a domain, it almost certainly means something is hijacking your DNS settings. The first step to check would be the hosts file /etc/hosts Then look here to determine what server or process is resolving your DNS /etc/resolv.conf Alternatively, you can use this command scutil --dns Firefox may be working ...


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Fresh Installation will definitely be a solution. Also restoring network devices will further kill any infection possibility. If you don't want to enable 'noscript', then try disabling unwanted browser plugins, specially Java. Most of the web attacks from browsers exploit these plugins to drop malwares. Disabling plugins will keep you safe from such ...


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Wiping your system and restoring from trusted media is definitely a good idea. At that point your system should be safe. However, I'd also suggest rotating your passwords on online services as well as using new passwords when you reinstall Linux. If you have ssh keys in use it wouldn't be a bad idea to rotate them as well. It may seem a little excessive but ...


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From the Add-on FAQ: Are add-ons safe to install? Unless clearly marked otherwise, add-ons available from this gallery have been checked and approved by Mozilla's team of editors and are safe to install. We recommend that you only install approved add-ons. From the "more information" link in the FAQ: Full Review — a thorough functional and ...


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Let's get into the details of what a guest session is on Ubuntu. You've asked 'is it more secure for the system to use a guest session rather a normal account?', and the answer is yes, but only slightly. Guest sessions use a tmpfs instead of a home, so data does not get written to disk but stays in RAM. This means a prolongated session with important ...


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Yes, it wipes the whole session (more concretely, the $HOME of the guest user). An attacker would need to enter into another account (either root or eg. a normal user with a weak password). Unless it manages to do so, any change will disappear on logout, which is nice for security, but inconvenient for users. However, that things are wiped doesn't mean ...



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