New answers tagged

-2

Honestly do not know if it is malicious or not, but it is used in TOR browser to prevent scripts, and I've seen it work within the TOR browser when booted into Tails OS and it doesn't appear to do anything but prevent scripts from running. I would definitely watch what you click though, as I did notice an advertisement/link for the "speed up my pc" junk ...


1

Panopticlick is looking for things that make you different to other visitors. In this case, fewer people use canvas blockers than don't, so you become more unique if you use one. However, this only means that it is easier to tell you apart from another user - not that they can tell who you are. Think of it being like a security camera which can only see ...


0

TL;DR: Yes, it probably improves security, but you could do even better with a "real" password manager. Long version: Firefox's "remember password" combined with a master password is the equivalent of a cloud-based password manager with excellent browser integration, local encryption, and automatic sync, but lacking pretty much any other features. Here's ...


-1

Master passwords and encrypting them on your computer further than what the OS already offer shows this is nothing more than security theater. Although it is convenient, it still leads to risky practices, and even worse makes it easier to forget your passwords. The Actual Impact on Security A great quote about why Chrome doesn't use a master password ...


4

Try to mark your IPs with type IP. (instead of type DNS.). Namely, make your section look like this: [alt_names] DNS.1 = chacheserver.net DNS.2 = *.chacheserver.net DNS.3 = *.*.chacheserver.net DNS.4 = *.*.*.chacheserver.net DNS.5 = 192.168.1.130 DNS.6 = 192.168.1.70 DNS.7 = 192.168.2.130 DNS.8 = 192.168.2.70 DNS.9 = 192.168.8.70 DNS.10 = 192.168.8.130 ...


3

You've added 127.0.0.1 to your alternative DNS for the certificate, but 127.0.0.1 is an IP address, not a domain name. The DNS field requires the use of a domain name, which means the client does a lookup on the domain name of the IP and gets localhost. Since this doesn't match ("127.0.0.1" != "localhost") you get the mismatch error. The field you're ...


1

Yes, they need your plaintext password to make the VPN work, simply because their service is badly configured. They shouldn't need your password in plaintext. The problem is that they use your plaintext password in their authentication procedure. When a new user creates an account, the VPN provider should properly hash their password and use that hash to ...



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