New answers tagged

1

Yes, they need your plaintext password to make the VPN work, simply because their service is badly configured. They shouldn't need your password in plaintext. The problem is that they use your plaintext password in their authentication procedure. When a new user creates an account, the VPN provider should properly hash their password and use that hash to ...


10

How does Firefox save the passwords? Previous answers have already presented the general idea, but a more in-depth explanation can be provided. Firefox stores all user information in the profile folder. On Windows, it's located under %APPDATA%\Mozilla\Firefox\Profiles\; and on Linux, ~/.mozilla/firefox/. The profile folder is created the first time ...


1

Unfortunately, if everything required to get your site password is stored on your computer then it is potentially vulnerable to malware. The only way to avoid this is to have user input (in some form). It is basically a trade-off between convenience and safety. If you don't have a password manager you trust and are willing to put some effort into ...


19

Firefox can decrypt the passwords without you entering a password. That means it must have the decryption key--which means any program that knows how Firefox stores things can find them. This applies to any program that stores information on your system. Encryption is only a strong defense if you have to provide the decryption key before accessing the ...


49

Passwords saved by Firefox are not encrypted (they are encrypted but the key can be read out) until you set a master password. I don't think that this is a bug, but every virus could read those passwords nonetheless


0

Traditionally the web administration service for most routers is bound to the LAN facing interface with at least basic HTTP auth. So the is strange for Motorola. So they must have either too small a memory footprint so they went with a HTTP server that does not do auth or they went with a language that has a HTTP web server module without HTTP auth built in ...


2

functions such as reboot and factory reset ... why would a modern browser allow internal resources to be loaded from an external page Most of today's routers and other networked devices will be administrated through a web interface. This means that there is some web server with a web application running on the device and the user is using the browser to ...


2

The short answer is: if your Firefox is compromised, it can do whatever it wants. It can modify whatever files it wants. It can even keylog and get root. But there are a few ways you can improve your security, like using a more secure browser, AppArmor or the NoScript plugin. The long answer is... Yes, if your Firefox process is compromised, it can do ...


1

Do they just appear to be more secure, or are they really? While this is always changing with Firefox's continual drive to improve their security, many of their add-on's appear more secure than they are. Mainly due to what problems haven't been discovered yet. Note the popular NoScript issues outlined in the following security article here. And other ...


3

Kaspersky, like most AV products these days, is performing a local MITM against your secure HTTP traffic. It does this in order to be able to scan payloads in HTTP transactions, be it in the request or the response. In order for this to be done correctly, Kaspersky has to generate its own root CA certificate, and generate spoofed certificates on the fly, ...



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