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5

Yes, definitely. See the Witty worm for an example of a vulnerability in a firewall product that was exploited by a network worm. Firewalls are nothing but software and affected by the same flaw. The more complex the firewall, the more likely it is for a bug to be introduced. For instance, a simple port filtering firewall is very unlikely to be affected by ...


3

Bittorrent trackers often operate on the same port 80 that web servers do, and data transfers don't operate on a fixed port. Port blocking isn't an effective way to block Bittorrent traffic, rather, your router needs to support deep packet inspection to identify and block the transfers. Consumer-grade routers almost never support deep packet inspection.


3

The first step in securing anything should be to evaluate what you need to secure and where somebody might attack you (attack surface). I don't know what you have to protect, but since you are doing your computing in the cloud you should not only ask yourself how to communicate with your cloud application, but how the application itself is secured, that is ...


2

Other possibilities are (or could be): exhausting resources on the firewall, leading to a denial of service - e.g. due to a need to keep connection state DNS cache poisoning if the firewall tries to resolve IP addresses XSS on a page denying HTTP connection breaking or poisoning firewall logs (ANSI bomb) or exploiting a software reading the logs


2

Docker was just added his own iptables rules before UFW rules see https://docs.docker.com/articles/networking/ for details. to avoid the pb I put DOCKER_OPTS="--ip 127.0.0.1" in my /etc/default/docker. so I bind only to localhost and it's not reachable from the outside.


1

1. Protect the server from getting hacked For this you could find multiple hardening guides, which combines locking down your machine, keeping it up to date with hotfixes and so on. 2. the data stored on the server should be encrypted Ensure your data is encrypted, you could do this using symmetric encryption (you suggested AES, with the key being a ...


1

"Websense" is a number versions of several different products, and without knowing which one is in use, I can't say for certain what the reason is that HTTPS connections are getting through. However, there are a couple of likely candidates: 1) Some Websense software does not have HTTPS proxy capabilities. Without this ability, the Websense software cannot ...


1

Having the client connect is the standard way of dealing with NATted connections. It can also known as a 'Reverse Shell'. BTW, I know you probably want to write your own RAT, but Metasploit might be a very effective demonstration ....


1

First, use a known clean computer (not related to anything you had and not connected to anything you have now) to clear up all your online presence, especially various cloud storage services such as icloud/googledrive/dropbox/onedrive. Close up any unneccessary accounts and get your email in order - it often is the key point that must be secure. Set up two ...


1

What you should do is resolve the IP addresses to see who uses them and check (IANA) port designations. Then adding audit rules (only for local clients though) gives you at least a time stamp, process and user Id, forcing clients through a proxy gets you at least a time stamp and host name and capturing packets (ulogd, tcpdump, Snort rule) may provide ...


1

This is a very broad question, depending on your setup. If you use SSL from your PC to your mailserver (wich is not administrated by the same guys) and your connection is secure, they can't see anything about your mail, except for the size. If you use unencrypted communication with your mailserver or the mailserver is administrated by the same guys it ...



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