New answers tagged

1

Assuming that you mean "can host X, which terminates the IPSec tunnel, apply iptables filters to the de-tunneled traffic?" then the answer is yes. Here's a Server Fault Q&A on this exact topic - With iptables, match packets arrived via IPSEC tunnel - which states You need to use the policy module, and specify the ipsec policy, to match this ...


1

It depends on whom you want to protect your services from. This security through obscurity attempt will only protect you from attackers that aim for quantity not for a specific target. If you are targeted by a person who deserves the description hacker it won't really help you.


11

It slightly offers some benefits. This is so called security through obscurity. There are many scanners active on the internet that have a default set of ports that they scan (like 21 (FTP), 22 (SSH), 25 (SMTP), 80 (WWW), 110 (POP3), 443 (SSL) etc.). By using alternative ports you fend off some of those scanners. I know from experience that if you have an ...


12

If the port is accessible from the outside, it cuts down on the number of random scan: most of the simplest automated scanners will simply check the default port. However, it can also induce a false sense of security: it doesn't provide any actual protection from anyone using a more sophisticated tool. So, from a security point of view, it's useless. From ...


0

Nope not at all. An attacker can simply execute the following nmap command to identify the port number. nmap -sV --script=banner https://nmap.org/nsedoc/scripts/banner.html http://securityblog.gr/1624/banner-grabbing-with-nmap/


1

Well, the obvious question is - can the External Database access resources on the network the Internal Database is on? If the External Database is isolated from the LAN, then that means that an attacker that ends up getting not only into the External Database's records, but also to the External Database's host OS, is unable to get farther into the network. ...


3

There are situations where an external-facing database is used to store temporary information which is "pulled" not "pushed" through a one-way firewall connection into a larger internal database then that data is deleted from the external-facing one. The purpose for this is to reduce the number of records which can be stolen at any given time yet allowing ...


1

Using either the Windows (host) firewall or the guest OS firewall to do that is not recommended. All VM tools already provide that kind of control. Have a look at the different types of networking available. You want a host-only network. By design that can only be used between the host and the VM, it is never accessible outside the host. I should also have ...


4

If you don't plan on ever playing Solitaire on your machine, why allow it through the firewall? You can always reverse your decision later if you decide to become a Solitaire fanatic, but until then it's safer to just deny Solitaire access. I know it looks legit and it almost certainly is the application trying to connect with the Microsoft network to ...


5

Stateful firewalls are mindful of incoming connections that are part of a circuit that was previously established. iptables can certainly do this. The short answer is that you need a firewall rule that blocks all new incoming connections, but allows established incoming connections.



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