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1

In the drawing below you have three networks which are connected though a firewall. The role of the firewall is to limit the traffic between these networks. Limiting the traffic means that you can decide that only traffic going to a certain port (say, 22) is allowed, how often you can connect to a given host from another one etc. There is nothing special ...


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Is it an actual piece of hardware? (I have seen both hardware and software online). as you stated, it can be both. Windows has a built in firewall ... but there are also hardware devices that are dedicated to the task (usually for larger networks) How do firewalls work in tandem with Active Directory? Um, it doesn't? Unless I am missing something ...


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Sadly this is a question for your IT department. Without having advanced knowledge of your system's infrastructure and if the firewall is before, after, or on the ATT router we can't say anything for certain, or even a simple guess... You need to talk to IT with your concerns and get it cleared up by them. They are the only ones who would know for certain. ...


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Most applications should be using static ports on the servers side. In other words, one side of a connection should always be using a predictable port. Unfortunately, as you stated, living with a firewall can be a pain at first, while you build a robust policy set. You have to identify each and every service necessary and add appropriate policies to your ...


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Due to architectural necessity, Web Application Firewalls (WAFs) protect against attacks at other layers as well. However, these protections are largely incidental and not comprehensive. Let me illustrate this with some examples: Presentation Layer - let's assume that the application to be protected uses TLS. If so, the WAF device must by definition* ...


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There is another risk using private / LAN IP addresses for public DNS records. Suppose you have a laptop user in your LAN, who uses web.company.com (which resolves for example to 192.168.178.10). If this user connects his laptop to another network (wifi!), and tries to use web.company.com, it will resolve to 192.168.178.1 using the public DNS entry. It may ...


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Just to add my two cents' worth... Years since this question was first posted, I've had this problem with BitDefender starting this week (now running BitDefender Internet Security 2016). Today I had port scans from IP's (apparently) located in the UK (same as me), Spain, and Iran. I could not understand why, when behind a router with the firewall enabled, ...


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While you are upgrading the system, you don't want to build the same level of security, but rather, a better level of security. You want to do real authentication, not just IP restrictions. This can be done by, for example, using hardware security module installed in the workstation. The HSM uses Public Key Authorization to authenticate the machine to the ...


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No. Incoming ports should only be whitelisted when the computer is intentionally providing a service to the outside world (e.g. web server, RDP, etc.). Yes, inspecting the traffic is the only way unless you already have an exhaustive list of software running on the machine and know which ports it relies on. However, this is generally not necessary for home ...


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As far as I know and understand the principle of VLANs there is no security risk by the protocol / device itself. By that I mean that VLAN are meant to segregate Layer2 unicast domains thus no, if properly configured VLAN_A and VLAN_B should not be able to talk to each other. All things being equal if you put user on a trunk there is no reason they should ...


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Although Fluffy and Matthew both suggest that the reason for the policy is to prevent abuse of SourceForge's services, implying that someone with legitimate access to the content would abuse that privilege, it's also worth noting that it also provides protection for your content / site. If your site has an file injection/inclusion vulnerability, such as... ...


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Why SourceForge's administrators block my web by a firewall? The answer on StackOverflow explains it all really. Previously, SourceForge allowed outgoing requests and this was abused, so they no longer allow it. Why Google can get some data from my website, as HTML page, easily? Because Google is not behind SourceForge's firewall (obviously) and ...


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Google is an external service, connecting into your server. A web server's firewall will normally be configured to allow this. You are trying to connect out from your server, which may well be blocked, since most web servers don't need that ability. You don't need it, for example, to include a Twitter feed (that's client side loaded), to upload files to your ...


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Speaking from experience, I have both a couple of PfSense fws and a Debian 8 with IPsec VPN+iptables. Putting all together, you would take more or less the same time. The advantage of PfSense is that you setup it once, and it is pretty much set and forget, aside the updates. The Debian box takes much more time refining the setup and maintaining. As for ...


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All the systems I have seen (either dedicated, appliance-like ones, or "helpers" in normal distributions) boil down to building an iptables configuration. The advantage of going though them is that you do not absolutely have, right away, to understand all the details when you use a default, well documented example configuration. What you look for instance ...


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Your question of why the forward rule doesn't work is essentially a networking question, so I'll explain using an analogy. Imagine there are three people involved in the sending of a letter - Alice, Bob, and you. Alice wants to get a message to Bob, but using you as a middleman (proxy). Alice could use one of two techniques: Method 1: Write a letter ...


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The VPN will take the route that finds valid at the time when its connection initializes, so it will connect with regard to the current routing settings. If you alter routes after the VPN is connected, depending on various factors, the VPN may still work or disconnect. If it continues to work, the new routes (set by the scrip loaded after VPN is connected) ...


4

The firewall installed at my college's router allows me to surf the internet but never allows me to download any package that has a size more than 100mb. I wonder how exactly does it differentiate between the two. According to my concept, they're both a flow of http packets so they should not be differentiable. I presume they are intercepting your traffic ...


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Don't waste your time trying to maintain GeoIP blacklists. It's a kneejerk response, and is shortsighted and ineffective in practice. Think of it like terrorism-- Timothy McVeigh detonates a bomb in Oklahoma. You ban all white men from America. Does that really stop the problem? The majority of actual attacks I've seen come from botnets and/or anonymous ...



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