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I do my best to develop code in-house, and make use of "SWAMP" which you can apply for access to. If you have coders in-house, you could implement your own plugin and potentially sell it on the side as an app. in the chrome-store. https://www.mir-swamp.org/ For IE you may be able to simply release a memo with instructions on how to access browser tools, ...


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No, since that would imply that Flash or JavaScript does have access to raw hardware, outside of its sandbox. Think opposite, that if a flash applet or JavaScript applet would have this access, it would be possible to build a keylogging website that remained Active across tabs. If you need to protect against keyloggers, I would suggest some sort of 2FA. ...


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It depends on how your site works. Flash allows you to call javascript, which allows the flash developer to access cookies as well as the DOM for the same origin the site was served up for. So if you're allowing users to serve up an SWF file on your domain, that means anyone visiting your clients page could do a XSS (cross site scripting) attack if your ...


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Unless you want to allow the additional interactivity afforded by flash, then yes go ahead allow them to upload. A large portion of the flash based net games work only because of this. However if you're only interested in providing streaming, then why not just video uploads? mp4, h264, vp8 etc. You're responsible for the users that visit the site, so being ...


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A while ago there was a Windows server vulnerability that was due to flaws in previewers that were triggered by search indexing mechanisms run on the server. That allowed an attack that was present in the uploaded media file to also infect the server. Both JPG and TTF previewer flaws were exploited by different kinds of malware. So it's historically been ...


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Older versions of flash .swf's contain vulnerabiltiies. A user could upload a clip created with an older version of Flash CS and thus expose hundreds of end users. If they don't have the latest flash player (and many don't), they could catch a nasty bug. The .swf could be triggered to launch a cross-site injection that deploys an IFRAME within the user's ...


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Any time that you allow users to upload files that other users can access, you introduce the possibility that a user could upload a malicious file. Flash, in particular is vulnerable to many different types of vulnerabilities. There would be no risk to your server because the swf file is downloaded to clients and run there. You could attempt to scan the ...


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The problem is that a vulnerable Flash version is a conduit into your system. There will be no way to see if your system was compromised via Flash. At best you will be able to see that you have some kind of infection/corruption in general, but you won't be able to tell how it happened.


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Well inadequacy is relative, in that you don’t know what they’re doing, but if you’re willing to do the research then you can find out i guess? Sandbox the browser using something like Sandboxie, which will then tell you what its trying to access, you could also install Wireshark on a machine and point all traffic going out from that machine to the machine ...



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