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1

To wipe the entire drive, all you have to do is wipe the spot that stores the encryption of K That statement is correct under its theoretical form. If you can guarantee you can wipe the key, and no one had ever access to that block, you have wiped the disk. I mean that if you have low-level disk access and got the right block copied somewhere, then you ...


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It is indeed possible that the block containing the key cannot be properly erased. That's why LUKS uses AFsplit to store the key on disk. The idea is essentially to expand a key that would normally be stored on a single disk block, into a format that requires many more, ensuring that the loss of a single of those blocks makes the key lost. So when erasing ...


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You mean that when you overwrite or delete data on a flash-drive, the microcontroller in that flash-drive doesn't immediately delete or overwrite the block, but instead put them on a 'delete-in-future-list' to improve performance. That's true, but also read: delete-in-future-list, that 'future' is when the microcontroller has no other actions to do. As soon ...



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