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4

One common attack method consistent with your symptoms is DNS Hijacking, which is any means that an attacker uses to convince your computer that your bank's web site, "www.mybank.com" is actually at an IP which is a server under their control instead of the IP under your bank's control. When you type this into any browser, it heads for the malicious server ...


3

With a weak kitchen magnet this can take many passes and a fair amount of time. In fact if all you have is a fridge magnet you may be better off scraping the strip off. However a more powerful magnet can erase the card fairly quickly. See http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/video-magnets-make-credit-card-mag-stripe-not-work-1457.php for details. ...


2

Seems to be a Man In The Middle attack with DNS spoofing. I suggest to perform a ping from an online service like this and check the IP address of the site. Then type it into your browser URL bar and check if you get redirect to the false website.


2

So they hacked my router? I didn't even know that was possible, but now that I think about it, it is remotely accessible on the LAN and the username/password is the manufacturer default. Will a hard reset of the router and then changing the username/password be sufficient now? Download the newest firmware for your router to a computer. Scan for ...


1

This is a suggestion to try to narrow down where the issue may lie. In Chrome, I suggest opening an incognito window, then opening the developer tools. Switch to the the network tab. Type in the correct URL in Chrome and hit enter. If the request in the network tab has the wrong URL, then something on your computer is changing the URL (maybe a bad add-on ...



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