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19

From an end user perspective, i usually give the reader and surrounding plates a good whack with my fist and i try and peel back any of the faceplates with my keys or a knife. The fact of the matter is, the best quality skimmers aren't detectable. POS machines can be hacked which results in an almost undetectable scenario. Your best bet, if you want to avoid ...


9

The newest skimmers cannot be seen. These skimmers wafer thin and insert into the card reader: To make matters worse the modification can be purely software. ATMs can be hacked, their software can be modified to log the mag strips and pins of every user. This is a purely loosing battle and you take a chance every time you use an atm. Security is ...


7

Payment protocols have many variants. However, they mostly boil down to the three following: The card number is just a reference, to be printed on paper. The owner signs with a pen on the paper. The paper may be printed with several technologies, some of them quite primitive (credit cards are embossed so that their number can be copied to paper efficiently ...


6

The best you can really do is use ATMs you know or ATMs that have good physical security if one you know isn't available. (go to an ATM inside a bank). Even then, I always spot check the machine for any signs of tampering. A simple trick that can work well is to make sure the keypad isn't compromised (by looking and pulling on it) and then if it appears ...


5

Phone numbers are easy to come by as are credit card numbers. Most credit card companies offer 1 time use credit card numbers and phone numbers can be had for less than a couple of bucks per month. It wouldn't be that hard to setup many SkypeIn or Google Voice numbers for example to get around the phone system issue. It would make things a little bit ...


5

Two factor authentication with Biometrics will definitely do the job but I would like to point out some issues with this technology. It is costly. This includes the cost of the devices and the manpower required to develop the system handle the registrations. There is no single standard to store the biometric data that the world follows. Different devices ...


5

AJ Henderson has the right solution IMHO. To expand on his approach here are the basics: There has to be a security briefing for invigilators explaining the various ways that official government ID can be checked. They should be warned that your company will stage fake impersonations to test their attention. Invigilators who would check IDs have to be ...


5

Ultimately, authentication of this kind is very hard when the person being authenticated is the attacker. If there are reliable government records, requiring these be presented (if allowed) is probably a good start. Proper training of security staff is also critical to ensure that they perform a thorough check regardless of the possibility of conflict. ...


4

I must admit I find your question and the security measures you're describing rather disturbing, to say the least. Parts of it literally screamed welcome to Orwellian Dystropia directly into my inner ears. In stereo, no less - the previous, and the newly proposed version both at the same time, like some off-key punctus contra punctum. The levels of identity ...


4

It likely depends on what network is being used to process the card. If the network is EFTPOS-like, a PIN is typical. However, if the network is credit-like, a signature is typical (at least, before EMV existed). A lot of cards are dual-branded, and how they are processed can depend on the configuration of the merchant's terminal. It's not likely to be a ...


4

What I think you'll find is that if you're in a country with Chip+PIN deployed, if a merchant takes a signature instead (usually because their Chip+PIN system is down) then the fraud liability moves from the customer to the merchant. So if you have fraudulent transactions on your card where the merchant doesn't have the PIN you can just dispute them and the ...


3

Signing for a credit card transaction is still quite common in countries where they use the magnetic strip on the side rather than the embedded smart card chip (which uses a PIN code). Note that this is a choice of the credit card company. A pin is indeed more secure, but for usability reasons not enforced everywhere (in Europe it is quite common these ...


3

There's a number of potential methods you can use to differentiate bots from humans but none of them are likely 100% Obviously as you say rate limiting catches the really stupid bots who don't know to click at human speed. You could say one click per IP but that will artificially deflate your stats in the case of humans behind a proxy (becoming more common ...


1

What you need to do is learn the tricks of the trade. What likely happened was your card was read by a "Skimmer" and then re-programmed on another card. Many Credit Card Companies make gift cards that look very similar to a real credit card, which makes life easier for a would be thief as finding a legit looking credit card has become much easier. Your best ...


1

Secure Revolving Systems This is the latest anti-skimming tech out there. It basically rotates the card as it's being inserted, preventing the skimmers from locking on the magnetic data strip. It's just been recently invented by a card skimmer in prison. It was announced here. Regardless, as Rook mentioned earlier, security is relative. Software can still ...



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