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0

Erasing or damaging the magnetic strip well stop it being read, this may prevent the card working in some ATMs and such. As pointed out card not present, contacted (this one is lethal) and using an old imprinter (if still allowed for use by merchant bank) are valid loopholes. However the EMV spec has a mode of doing a signature transaction without the PIN ...


2

Please remember that SSN numbers are NOT random. They include data like where it was issued, and what year it was issued. This might not be hard data, but it can be used to infer data about the person it was issued to. http://www.ssa.gov/history/ssn/geocard.html http://www.stevemorse.org/ssn/ssn.html ...


1

I don't know about the magnetic strip. I guess you can. In my country almost all shops have chip-readers. And if the card doesn't work, report it broken and you get a new one. CSC / CVV But what about the card security code (CSC or CVV). With your credit card number, expiration date and CSC anyone can shop online. No need to steal a card! It's just a ...


-1

Yes. Justification: there are 109 possible Social Security Numbers (for those outside the United States, a US Social Security Number, aka SSN, is a string of nine characters drawn from the set 0-9, generally formatted as XXX-XX-XXXX). Despite its name, it should not be treated as a number, since '0' is a valid first character. So yes, given that there ...


0

Why not write "VOID" (or "CHIP & PIN ONLY") in big letters in the signature field on the card (and take a photo of it for your records)? That should only allow it to be used for chip and PIN transactions. If a merchant does allow it to be used for a signature transaction, then the merchant and bank are going to have a hard time justifying allowing the ...


7

Don't do this, it will not work in ATM machines in my experience. I've had to get a new debit card mailed in last month because there was a little scratch out of the magnetic strip, although I had not noticed and had used it for daily chip-only and wireless transactions. It wouldn't work in any (Dutch) ATM machine afterwards (I tried my own bank's and ...


1

If you live in an area where no ATM and other cash terminal needs the magnetic strip, you can use a strong magnet to scramble the magnet strip. I personally have done this using a recycled neodymium magnet out of a decommissioned hard drive. Note: never put your debit card in a microwave if you intend to use it afterwards.


-2

You should mark all of your cards "see photo ID" in the signature block on back. If a merchant accepts a fraudulent transaction after you've done this, it's entirely on them.


10

YES, but there is a big chance that an (internally chip-capable) ATM (depending on region) will reject the card! The most common 2 problems for an ATM (including chip-capable) to reject a card are: a dirty or scratched magstripe (as shown in spork's answer) an erased or mangled (=invalid) magstripe by exposure to magnets or EMP (they need to emit ...


14

Embossed letters are still present on CC to allow to quickly carbon-copy (literally) the card on paper. That's in the (very) old days, but still allowed today, and it will count as PRESENTIAL. Magnetic strip is still there because half of the CC readers still work that way. ATM and TPV outside USA and UE are still missing the chip reader, and even inside ...


28

As Phil stated, you can still use the card using its number (as you would do on-line). Also, some ATM machine won't accept the card if not able to read the magnetic strip. The best thing is to use a credit card: in that case you can block the payment and get a refund.


23

Yes, you can. On some places you can find a device called demagnetizer. Just run your card over it (or over a very strong magnet), and the magnetic track will be corrupted and you will only be able to use the chip part of the card.


6

Is there anything I can do to prevent them from tarnishing my [...] E-mail address In short: no. In general, you can't prevent anyone from using your email address and sending email on your behalf. You can do a little something by using forwarders that adopt SPF. This means that to be able to send an email to me, pretending to be from you, someone ...


2

You can't. The way the mail system is designed does not ensure that sender email addresses must be verified. The email system we used was originally designed for a closed environment where all the members of the network were known and trusted, security and verification of sender address was not a requirement. When the internet was created there was no ...


1

This organisation should have a specific landing point for customers to receive/verify/modify their PIN code, which does not depend on departments, and department staff should be trained to not give this information just as they would not give other sensitive personal information. The reason is you can't ask departments to reason about the sensitivity of ...



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