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As GdD said, it's CallerID spoofing with the hope of tricking you into answering a 'local' call. I've had this happen where they used my own number as the Caller ID number! I answered because I thought there might have been a glitch in the matrix and that it was a legitimate caller, but no, it was spam (and yes, I should have known better.) Their real ...


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The telephone system has been designed so that a caller can replace their phone number with a fake, and some unscrupulous companies use this to change their number to appear to be local to the person they are calling. They aren't using specific numbers of people you know, just something picked at random. The thinking is that a person is more likely to pick ...


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Plenty of things could have happened. To start with, emails which are not digitally signed cannot be trusted: they can be tampered with in transit (not very likely when the exchange is between two large providers) the sender can simply fake the email (such an email may not be accepted by the recipient's system and one could check the path it took to reach ...


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I disagree with @quietsigns answer. There are other people that could potentially see your email. For one - email can be sniffed while in transit. Probably not super likely but still possible. Second - if the destination email is ever compromised (or is currently compromised) then it's likely that this email will just be sitting there. If you are really ...



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