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Most likely, the attacker has embedded a script in the document or in another document in the same account. Check all of the documents for embedded scripts and make sure there are no stand-alone scripts either. Also make sure that none of the files have been shared with an external user id. Then make sure the user turns on 2-factor authentication on their ...


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Read Google Chrome's privacy policy here Navigational errors caused are resolved automatically through Google servers. You can disable them in the Settings > Advanced Settings > Privacy. In fact, you may disable all checkboxes in Privacy section in order to not allow contacting Google every time you search something. You can also block cookies from Google ...


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Yes, it is sending the information to Google but It uses your computer's dns server. In Google you even have an ad ID correlated with you. This way they get to know your interests and give you according advertisements. However, I think that with incognito mode it doesn't send anything, because that's the point of it. EDIT: [This part is about incognito] ...


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No. I'm not even talking about whether it's good enough for finance or not, I'm just saying if Google is the only way to login to your service, then I won't use it, and neither will do other privacy-conscious users. Now, on the technical side. Using third-party logins is less secure because a failure on the third-party site will also affect yours, and the ...


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I use Prot-On, it is free app that allows decide who and when can access documents on Google Drive and track their usage at any time. For the moment, it is the best. http://www.prot-on.com


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Unless you encrypt all data on the client side, the answer is as easy as: Anything you store with Google is not secure at all, even more so (but not exclusively) if you use third party apps to access the data. Any app that you use and give access to your Google account can do pretty much anything, from working as you expect to reading and modifying files, ...


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To actually answer your question, no, Google does not provide the IP address of the user back to the original website. According to the developer documentation, Google will supply the website with a JSON object basically containing either true or false. { "success": true|false, "error-codes": [...] // optional } But none of this really even matters, ...



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