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6

I read somewhere that reCAPTCHAs use the movement of the mouse (only in their area) to determine if you are a bot or not. Try this use mouse keys on your computer (if it is windows use Left-Alt + Left-Shift + NumLock) to move the mouse straight up. This should trigger the image selection test.


32

Google tries to figure out if you are a bot or not. If it's in doubt, it serves you a CAPTCHA to check. Exactly how this is done is part of Google's secret sauce, and I don't think they will tell you. But here are some ingredients I guess that they mix together: Your IP: Has it been identified as a bot already? Is it a Tor exit node? The resources you ...


1

I think your friend has a phone hacked: a malware can stealthly receive and conceal 2-factor codes, then transmitting them to the attacker


2

If they are, those files aren't really evidence of it, they are just minified bundles of some of the CreateJS libraries. Both contain fillText and strokeText. What is going on here? The CreateJS libraries are mainly used for canvas drawing, and there is a "private" function which will draw text, _drawTextLine. Those are the instances of ...


2

There is nothing to worry about. I live in Japan and it throws the same results. I think is good that you did notice the difference (which means you are aware of small changes). Google decided to add some localization to its results for some reason (maybe to show that there is support in that language?). Its indeed strange to me as well, why displaying just ...


1

Android requires app updates to be signed by the same key as the original app. So unless the developers themselves have been compromised, a MITM won't be able to update existing apps. Note that this process is completely unrelated to SSL certificates. App signing certificates are self signed and don't rely on certificate authorities for trust. It sounds ...


0

I would not say that I am an expert in this so my point may not be valid. I quickly readed on Wikipedia On modern mobile devices such as smartphones, an over-the-air update may refer simply to a software update that is distributed over Wi-Fi or mobile broadband using a function built into the operating system From this quote we may note that the ...


2

Taking a look at the specific source code piece(GoogleDrive.java) that handles credential file creation/initialization, I found this: Line 449: /** Directory to store user credentials. */ private final java.io.File DATA_STORE_DIR; Line 473: public GoogleDrive(Properties configuration) { DATA_STORE_DIR = new java.io.File("data/google/" + ...


4

However, for security patches, wouldn't a staggered release make it much easier for blackhat hackers to utilize the now-public vulnerabilities against users whose devices have not yet received the OTA, even though a patch for their device model is already available? Easier than what?, is the important question. Yes it will be easier for the hacker ...


55

Excellent question. Yes, your understanding is correct, as well as your rationale behind it. Staggering roll outs for new features often makes good sense. Staggering roll outs for security patches rarely is a good idea. As you pointed out, this gives even more opportunity for the vulnerabilities to be exploited. Perhaps even more importantly, the ...


3

Google's new reCAPTCHA uses cookies: To put it simply: user’s past behavior and previous CAPTCHA solves are recorded in their cookies, which are then detected by future reCAPTCHA challenges. So seeing different behavior in different browsers isn't surprising. You may find that using an incognito/private browser window changes the behavior.


0

This is something that you will commonly face through TOR too. Since a large number of people may be using the same server/exit-node as a proxy, Google receives a larger number of requests from a single machine. When it detects this, it asks you to solve a captcha to prove that you aren't a robot. It doesn't matter if your using safari. Use chrome, and ...


1

Not officially, but there was a bug that was only recently fixed as documented on http://webkay.robinlinus.com/ that could gain access to currently logged in Google+ info. I think it's safe to assume there will be other vulnerabilities both present now or in future, just like there was another in the past that has also been fixed and don't forget there's ...



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