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1

Probably not. The information provided by that endpoint is fairly deterministic in nature, so anyone with enough motive (e.g. has 20 minutes to kill) can guess the details and generate the same password as you for that user. Additionally, that hash will fail every time (or often enough) a new token is issued, so you need to always keep the record updated. ...


1

By writing: User-agent:* Disallow: Allow: / You are saying to the robots: everything is allowed and nothing is disallowed. This may be confusing for robots. I suggest you to write those rules of Robots Exclusion Protocol clearer by changing the content of your robots.txt file to: User-agent: * Disallow: Or: User-agent: * Allow: / This way you are ...


1

Yes, it's probably fine. Just to be safe, I'd also change the recovery email and phone number, review the list of authorized apps to make sure there's nothing fishy there, enable two-factor authentication, scan computers used to access the account for malware, and ask friends to be alert for anything suspicious originating from the account. You may also want ...


0

Yes, why not? I personally has never been informed that there is suspicous activity on my account, but I'm usally very careful where I leave my email address. And I have a strong password and two factor authentication enabled. My advice is to change password, set a strong password, and enable two factor authentication. And check your app passwords list to ...


3

Quite safe, discounting any cold boot attack or any vulnerability that allows bypass of the OS's lock screen. Chrome encrypts its cookies, using a password based encryption scheme. In Windows, this is based upon the Data Protection API. This means that anyone who gains access to the laptop by either changing the Windows password using a tool such as chntpw, ...


1

This sounds like Evernote simultaneous search, I'd say that it will be sending the search queries you enter to the evernote service in order to provide this feature. Whether that's a problem for you will depend on whether you're happy with Evernote seeing that information. Obviously you trust them not to be actively malicious as you've installed their ...


3

Anyone who can access your computer and open the browser, can access your google account. But you can revoke the access from the machine any time you want via this link from any other device/PC. Just go to " Registered computers" and then "change settings" ( i did a translate from my native language to what would be on English ) You will be logged out ...


4

If your hard drive wasn't encrypted, someone could access your hard drive and view the cookies used for authentication, and bypass 2 factor.


37

First things first, change your password and make sure the new password is secure (10+ characters, a number somewhere other than the last character, a capital somewhere other than the first character, not an iteration on your past password, etc). This is good to do periodically anyway. GMail has tools for seeking suspicious account activity. Specifically, ...


1

First, check the Account Activity Details link at the bottom of the webpage. Second, re-secure your account (change password, add 2-factor authentication,...) This question deals with a similar situation of needing to re-secure a gmail account and check for unwanted access: Fell for phishing scam. Is my gmail account with 2-step verification vulnerable?


0

The question can't be answered by anyone other than google. You may want to ask them but I doubt they will give you a response. The only thing we can know for sure is that the passwords are not hashed because if they were then google would not be able to impersonate you to the mail server. So google is storing the passwords unhashed they may be stored as ...


4

The details of how Google implemented this functionality is unknown and proprietary to google so it isn't possible to answer your question completely. However, here are the high points: Google will have to save your POP3 account password in their system. There is no way around this because POP3 has no is no standard way to delegate rights to a third-party ...


-6

The password should be transmitted in plain text, otherwise Google can't send requests to the third party mail server as this mail server expects the password to be in plain text. Is this safe? No, it is not! Please note: Using POP3 to fetch your e-mail is also not considered secure as there is no transport layer protection. It is recommended to only ...


19

Since you didn't enter your second factor code from your phone, and since you didn't say that you received a text requesting the second factor, you should be safe. However, if you want to be sure that all bases are covered (or if you hadn't enabled 2 factor authentication), there are a few things to check to be sure that you haven't been compromised and ...



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