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1

Microsoft's own guidance on password protection of worksheets in Excel 2013 includes: Remember, though, that this type of protection doesn't encrypt your files. Users can still use third-party tools to read your data. Also to note that password protection in Excel 2013 is different to earlier versions of Excel, if you save a workbook in the earlier non-XML ...


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So you protect cells with a password, then close that document, upload it to Google Docs, and Google removed the password protection just like that? If that's the case, the password protection is not really that solid. If you had to enter the password, you know why. Google does simply not provide 100% identical import. Some functions may be lost. If you ...


11

You can't. The password protection is only designed to prevent edits by mistake. This is a type of DRM protection, where you use rules to decide who can read or write to data. If you open the file with a software which does not care about the rules, the password protection will be bypassed. Thats why Adobe have encryption so if you protect your document ...


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By adding javascript files from an external domain, you also give the owner of that domain control over your web page. However, you can isolate the part the js has access to with sandboxed iframes, that are widely supported. But even with isolation, if you add the points via their api, google has still access to them. A solution would be to draw the points ...


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According to Google maps API's Terms of Service agreement, Google has a right to obtain information from you, when you use Maps JavaScript API. Basically, when using the JavaScript Maps API, the following information is sent to Google: Map size and location for retrieving map tiles and copyrights Addresses for geocoding Direction and Elevation ...


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No. The correct/incorrect old password is just data used in a recovery process. Google knows how you changed the password (via forgot password, via the normal change screen) and when, and how old the password is in numbers (eg you changed password 2 times after this old password). So this data is used in a general scoring model to determite if you are a ...


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Cookies are used to retain information between visits to a website. This gives website the ability to remember you between visits. This allows them to provide better service, but also gives them the opportunity to analyze your long-term behavior. Disabling cookies is a tradeoff between privacy and convenience. You have to decide for yourself if you want to ...


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This really depends on the sites you're logged in to and how alert you are as a person. I can imagine the following scenarios (not specific to any of the sites you mentioned, but just general scenarios): Sensitive information is transmitted in the URL: For each request, a session ID is transmitted in the URL. In this case proxy servers will log the ...


2

In my understanding, "less secure apps" refers to applications that send your credentials directly to Gmail. Lots of things can go wrong when you give your credentials to third party to give to the authentication authority: the third party might keep the credentials in storage without telling you, they might use your credentials for purposes outside the ...


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People are using mobile apps that do not take proper actions to secure GMail users credentials. So Google is taking the only thing it can do: ending malicious hackers fun by forbidding apps from throwing users and passwords around and forcing the use of an authentication method that it trusts (their own!). The problem with these apps is not one, but ...


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I would suggest you Create a Hotspot on your Laptop Install WireShark on your Laptop Run Wireshark on the your network interface that the HotSpot is on Disable GSM Services on your phone Enable WIFI on your phone and connect to your Hotspot (from step 1) Watch the Traffic flow from your Phone What I think you will find is .... Most data is being sent ...


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bit.ly itself is ok, it's that stupid little hash after the domain name that's at issue. It may lead to a malvertisement or infection engine. And since you're going through a link shortener, you don't know where you're ending up until after you click the link. Treating all shortened links as suspect isn't a bad move. Fortunately after scanning, enough ...


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TL;DR: Shortened links are not safe at all, and have never been. https://safebrowsing.clients.google.com/safebrowsing/diagnostic?site=bit.ly shows the following: What is the current listing status for bit.ly? Site is listed as suspicious - visiting this web site may harm your computer. Part of this site was listed for suspicious activity 31 ...



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