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the only defense against this is using Key Pinning the problem is that that only works as soon as the client has connected with the web service at least once (to have the proper value for the pin) and another problem can be that the pin holds for a long time so replacing your certificate or key is not possible while the pin holds (unless you plan ahead and ...


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From what I understand you already have in place policies/procedures and all that stuff. My advice is to take a look on Time Based Security (was written in 1999, but still gold). The main formula for Time Based Security: Pt>Dt+Rt If the amount of protection time (Pt) you offer is greater than the sum of the detection time (Dt) and reaction time ...


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No, your update process is flawed, and anybody trying to comprimise it will succeed. I assume you are not using TLS/HTTPS, as you don't mentioned them in your question. That's why: Your public key is to be obtained from the Internet This allows the attacker to intercept the connection and provide a tampered public key. All your verification process was ...


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No. An attacker can make a binary. They can then make a hash from their binary, and encrypt it with their private key. They then package their binary and supply the malicious binary, public key to the camera. Because the attacker is able to supply the public key and the content, he controls both sides of the check and the system is easily compromised. At ...


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Here 6 key steps : 1 - Secure your application code 2 - disable all modules not used. Try to disable all, and then, one by one, add modules. 3 - remove all scripts and backup files in the web folder. 4 - disable directory listing 5 - use modsecurity to protect your application from application-level attacks. 6 - Use Fail2ban to trigger HTTP errors ...


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Im unsure if this is the "correct" approach, but I would change the permissions of the file to owned by root but also owned by another group which only has read access. Making sure your upstart user is in this shared group. # groupadd upstart # usermod -G upstart the_user # chown root:upstart the_file.conf # chmod 740 the_file.conf The above adds a new ...


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I'll suggest an answer to my own question. Perhaps I'm essentially helping to define a term that has been introduced elsewhere. If we take the definition of 'hardening' in security as: hardening is any one of a variety of measures taken to make it more difficult for an intruder to circumvent the authentication process Then 'key hardening' is any ...



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