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There's actually an attack documented which fits pretty good to your description. The original post was deleted but you can read it for example here. Short version: They (Netragard) managed to break into a corporate network in a penetration test by using a manipulated mouse which was sent to an employee as a faked lottery price. The USB connection was ...


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This issue affect both laptops, tablets and cellphones with similar solutions, so even if only laptops were explicitly mentioned in the OP's question (with still a link to an article focusing on cellphones), I think it can be useful to address the issue as a whole. There are several ways to counter malicious use of embedded microphones: Physical ...


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Linux uses TSC by default for its clock source due to its lower overhead, and only uses HPET as the fallback. The kernel gathers entropy from interrupt timing intervals, using the RDTSC instruction on x86 processors. Unless you do not have TSC support, then I do not believe disabling HPET will influence your entropy collection at all. Only on certain ...


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Yes, you can brute-force a hardware-encrypted SSD drive. The time it takes to be successful though is up to the method used, the length of the password and the hardware & software capabilities of the machine doing the BF attack (which dictates how many tries/sec can be attempted).



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