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36

Well "impossible" is impossible to prove which is why in the linked answer I said "almost impossible", maybe even that is overstating it. By using a secure hardware device the attack vector goes from "malware installed remotely on host steals secret," to "attacker needs to physically gain access to the hardware device and destructively remove the private ...


19

Hardware crypto modules like this are regulated by a set of standards called FIPS 140-2 which specify the ridiculous lengths that the devices must go to in order to protect the private keys inside them. There are four levels of FIPS 140-2, briefly summarized as: Level 1: It does basic crypto-y things. Level 2: "Tamper-evident"; it's impossible to extract ...


6

There is a TI wiki page for the Crypto hardware on the AM335x here. On that page there is a tutorial on how to compare the performance of the hardware accelerator versus the pure software implementation. After the modules are installed, OpenSSL commands may be executed which take advantage of the hardware accelerators through the OCF-Linux driver. The ...


1

Because of the way a SSD works, your files content might have been moved around your SSD, leaving their contents potentially scattered around free flash space. The most effective way to erase (conveniently) those traces is to create a non-empty file that fills the whole disk, then delete it. However, SSDs have spare space in order to keep on working when a ...


1

Although many low-level flash chips do provide a hardware "write-protect" pin, operation is completely unspecified if the state of that pin changes in the middle of a write operation; while changing the pin around the time an operation is started might always have the effect of either preventing the operation altogether (if done soon enough), allowing one ...


1

UEFI Secure Boot provides protection from this type of attack by requiring cryptographically signed executables. Generally speaking, you need a tamper-resistant hardware module that validates the bootloader (e.g. a TPM chip). To protect yourself from hardware backdoors you need something like the Intel Trusted Execution Technology. Basically, all your ...


1

Not really, or at least it is very hard. Recently a research paper on Stealthy Dopant-Level Hardware Trojans was published which shows how to include a Trojan into hardware that is so hard to detect that even if we optically compared the chip to a non-tampered unit we wouldn't find it. Read the abstract of the paper for an overview and if you want to know ...



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