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140

No, you are just being paranoid. You were probably already connected to him over WiFi. There are many attacks he could have run this way without additional devices. Also if he would have wanted to hack you, he would not have thrown his strange hacking device in your face. He would have hidden it below the table. Side note: I feel like most of the people ...


115

Perhaps he was using one of these wireless chargers that are built into the tables. It certainly fits your description.


37

Well "impossible" is impossible to prove which is why in the linked answer I said "almost impossible", maybe even that is overstating it. By using a secure hardware device the attack vector goes from "malware installed remotely on host steals secret," to "attacker needs to physically gain access to the hardware device and destructively remove the private ...


36

I don't know what that gizmo is, but unless you've got a really bizarre laptop, it wouldn't be useful for attacking your computer. Outside of a laboratory setting, attacking a computer means using its standard input or output capabilities. An ordinary wifi or Bluetooth antenna can reach your laptop from anywhere in the room; a directional antenna can ...


21

TL:DR - Yes, routers CAN be vulnerable. Misconfigured/Unconfigured routers - A ton of people just install their routers and leave the default accounts turned on without modification. Thus allowing attackers easy access. Vulnerable built in scripts - http://www.reddit.com/r/netsec/comments/1xy9k6/that_new_linksys_worm/ See: What is the ...


19

Hardware crypto modules like this are regulated by a set of standards called FIPS 140-2 which specify the ridiculous lengths that the devices must go to in order to protect the private keys inside them. There are four levels of FIPS 140-2, briefly summarized as: Level 1: It does basic crypto-y things. Level 2: "Tamper-evident"; it's impossible to extract ...


13

Other answers have been given to answer whether routers are secure: your router likely has unpatched vulnerabilities. A recommendation for making things more secure would be to put a real Linux box in front of your router. Configure it for automatic security updates every 10-30 minutes so your patches come quickly. For kernel vulnerabilities, you could use ...


11

As @cremefraiche said, the object fits the profile of an wireless iPod/iPhone charger. As the coil works as an antenna, it could theoretically be used to send data from the device. To investigate if this device is charger or a surveillance bug, you can try to pry it open. If the 30-pin connector has anything else than the power-lines connected, it is ...


7

Although I agree with the other posters that the device in question probably was not a hack attempt, I disagree with their conclusion that he was not trying to hack you. In fact, I recommend adopting the strategy that everybody is trying to hack your equipment. That sounds paranoid, but it leads to the type of security that is more difficult (i.e. ...


7

There is a TI wiki page for the Crypto hardware on the AM335x here. On that page there is a tutorial on how to compare the performance of the hardware accelerator versus the pure software implementation. After the modules are installed, OpenSSL commands may be executed which take advantage of the hardware accelerators through the OCF-Linux driver. The ...


6

Trusted Platform Modules A Trusted Platform Module (TPM) is a hardware chip on the computer’s motherboard that stores cryptographic keys used for encryption. Many laptop computers include a TPM, but if the system doesn’t include it, it is not feasible to add one. Once enabled, the Trusted Platform Module provides full disk encryption capabilities. It ...


6

A router is actually a small computer; most of them use the same kind of software as full-fledged servers (typically some Linux variant). As such, it has security holes, that should be patched promptly when discovered. Vulnerabilities that are not fixed might be exploitable and yield remote control to attackers, at which point they can do what they want with ...


4

The AES competition received 15 candidates, two of which suffered from "academic breaks" (weaknesses that are only theoretical, but still demonstrate that the underlying block cipher is not "optimally secure"). The remaining 13 are, to my knowledge, still unbroken to this day. Therefore, the choice of Rijndael had to be done for reasons other than security. ...


4

The following is a possible series of steps you could take. I'm considering that you have a secondary, online HSM for the period during which the affected HSM is removed from service for repair. Destroy all key material on the HSM Notify vendor of device problem and serial number Return device in tamper evident packaging to vendor address using secure ...


4

Be careful with the word "unrecoverable". It depends what level of "unrecoverable" you are going for. If you want to stop a casual computer user from reading your data from a live-boot OS, then things like shred, dd, dban will do the trick. If, however, you are worried about someone flashing the firmware of your drive, or removing the platters and putting ...


3

The latest version of msed had been pushed to github with executables at www.r0m30.com/msed. The 0.20beta release has a PBA for bios machines and the ability to load it after activating the locking SP. I'm still developing some real documentation but the announcement contains some quick and dirty instructions for activating OPAL 2.0 hardware FDE using ...


3

Many copy machines and all-in-one scan/print/copy/fax machines (especially from HP) have internal hard drives they use for temporary storage. It's been in the news from time to time that people have recovered sensitive data from these drives, either using data-recovery software or by simply reading the drive filesystem.


3

Is it common for scanners to somehow cache or log documents they scan (on the scanner machine itself)? Yes, probably nearly all which aren't specially designed to be hightly confidential Does scanner driver/software often have temporary folders which end up leaving a trace of the document? Yes also. Can a networked scanner maliciously or ...


3

You are somehow thinking that dead tree docs are less secure than digital copies. I may venture to say you are mistaken in this belief. Digital data may be stolen in a myriad different ways. The scanner may be reporting to HP or other companies/agencies, while your computer may be already compromised. Your computer will have vestigial data on the hard ...


3

Here's a whitepaper from logitech on the technology. They seem to believe it is secure, and apparently the two devices are paired at the factory. The actual key never gets broadcast. It has a short range of about 33 feet. It certainly isn't 100%, but if you're worried about the NSA... I doubt this is your biggest problem. A regular keyboard is most likely ...


3

Can This be done? I would say yes, but with some caveats. Depending on the cable and the data, you would need some very expensive / sensitive equipment to pull this off. To me this is a similar issue to the old Van Eck Phreaking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Eck_phreaking). Intel has some tech to circumvent this kind of attack: ...


3

This is a great question! Never thought about this until you asked. Firstly, code running inside a secure enclave runs in ring 3. So all restrictions that apply to untrusted non enclave ring 3 code apply. So an enclave cannot write to MSR's. Next, the specs don't explicitly mention anything about MSR's but it does tell you about interaction with IA32 ...


3

BSI: Application Notes and Interpretation of the Scheme (AIS) 31 – Functionality Classes and Evaluation Methodology for Physical Random Number Generators, Version 1 (25.09.2001), English translation. BSI's AIS site is here. Standard is here.


3

I don't know for you but I always felt like Android especially is not safe. Is somebody - the government or other - able to listen to my microphone, or access my hard drive remotely? Why do you think Android might be especially vulnerable? I expect the NSA has the tools to snoop in on practically anything connected to the Internet. I'm wondering if ...


3

If we assume that a hash is calculated based on the drive contents, and that we trusted the drive contents to be authentic at the time of hashing, then what you're worried about is some manner of hash collision (where two different pieces of data produce the same hash). Currently, SHA-1 attacks are only theoretical, but there's a potential they could become ...


3

For DDR4: One DRAM manufacturer, Micron, indicated that they are putting rowhammer mitigations into some of their DDR4 DRAM (see this data sheet). Other manufacturers might be doing the same. Note that it is not necessarily true that "DDR4 is OK". There's nothing in the DDR4 standard that makes DDR4 memory safer than DDR3 memory -- the DDR4 standard does ...



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