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1

I was curious (and perhaps board) so I just ran a quick test to see... I took an old flash drive (4gb was my smallest one), did a quick reformat (to NTFS) and tossed a simple text file on there. Using FTK Imager, I took a before and after image of my drive (just the raw data dump). I used disk wipe to wipe (using the defaults and basic wipe settings) my ...


3

The name of $TxfLog.blf is self-explanatory: The extension blf indicates a CLFS log file, and TxF stands for Transactional NTFS. You can see that TxF is just a temporary file that backs up transactions to help against sudden crashes, just like similar precautions in modern databases. There can exist some leakage from this file, but it only would consist of ...


2

In theory, no. The outer shell is a Faraday Cage, so the radiation from the microwave will not penetrate the shell to do anything to the plates. But it will render most of the control board unusable. The radiation can damage the controller chips, and arcing can damage the board tracks and passive components. But swapping the control board could make the ...


2

I don't know exactly if Disk Wipe works by overwriting the partition data, or the disk data. If it only overwrites partition data, there can be files left on hidden partitions. If you are confortable with Linux, it's very easy to nuke out a disk. Assuming your disk is on /dev/sdb, you could do this: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=65536 oflag=direct ...


0

All IBM HSMs allow development of custom firmware that can be loaded and executed in the HSM with the same level of security as the standard IBM firmware - in other words, the complete security provided by the HSM. The custom firmware can either be developed as an add-on to the standard IBM firmware, so that you get all of the standard HSM commands PLUS ...


0

Check out CrashPlan or other similar service (rsync) to replicate your data offsite (the further apart the better) while at the same time creating your own personal cloud. Put each location in a RAID configuration and use a program like Acronis's HDD Monitoring tool to email you if it detects disk errors. The critical stuff you absolutely can't use can be ...


0

From the bitstream to the netlist: http://www.univ-st-etienne.fr/salware/Bibliography_Salware/FPGA%20Bistream%20Security/Article/Note2008.pdf FPGA Bitstream Security Broken: http://beta.slashdot.org/story/155120 if you want to devote time, a lot of it, then you can reverse-engineer FPGA's. Using differential power analysis (DPA) to retrieve the security ...


1

For a “normal” computer (eg. may be infected but has no extra malice), booting from CD/usb, wiping the disk and performing a complete reinstall should be enough. Now, if the CIA is (knowingly) selling you the hardware where you will be storing the location of Russian submarines, you better throw that hardware away. It could do anything from sinply giving ...


5

From a security perspective, you can achieve the same security either through a review of the component (which you want to achieve with an open-source baseband through the many-eyes-principle), or proper isolation. Open source The first appproach is very hard, as regulatory authorities need to certify your baseband firmware. Because of this certification ...


4

No, doesn't seem to be anything. Understandable: there is almost zero consumer demand for such a product and it would be very expensive to develop (because of the expensive certification you need from Telecom regulatory authorities). By the way, you're probably worrying about the wrong thing. The main concern with baseband processors is not that the ...


3

It's not Android[1] but I'm really excited about the Neo900. I loved my old Nokia N900 and thought it was years ahead of it's time. The Neo900 upgrades the internals with fully open source software and hardware. They don't have open source base band firmware but they do specifically address that in their FAQs. I suspect that's as close as you can get. ...



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