New answers tagged

2

There is a really cool exploit named row hammer which answers your TLDR of can hardware be compromised. Yes it can. The premise of this attack is that because memory has been getting smaller and closer together to fit more memory onto a chip, the problem of DRAM cells interacting electrically with each other is now exploitable. If you access one location ...


1

The answer is yes, but if you're worried about e.g. a company like Intel doing this, the answer is almost certainly that they are not doing this on a wide scale. How do we know? Simple: for monitoring, you need communication. If your computer were to communicate with (say) the NSA, the data would have to pass through your communication channels, like your ...


2

You don't even need to hack it -- Intel now conveniently provides on-chip remote hardware access capability (AMT -- Active Management Technology) along with a documented API, so you can do stuff like reflash sleeping computers over the network.


8

Yes, it is possible, but that's already clear by now, isn't it. For instance, a hobbyist like me can implement a microcontroller-based hardware keylogger featuring a SIM card to report back via SMS or 3G wireless (similar to Amazon Whispernet). This sort of gadget must be standard issue for spying agencies around the globe, monitoring targets wirelessly. ...


16

Of course, the hardware/firmware also plays as role. The point is at the end of day, firmware also runs programs, and some controllers even provide full computing environments similar to small computers. It is no small wonder there are around projects that revolve around avoiding proprietary formats, either in binary blobs or in proprietary operating ...


33

Yes, if an attacker has physical access to your computer it is no longer your computer. While it's theoretically possible to implement spying directly in silicon on a modern CPU, a modern x86-based CPU is extremely complicated. An attacker would be better off using a peripheral device that uses something like USB which exposes certain interrupts in an ...


10

Yes. In 2013, researchers uncovered malware that resides in systems' BIOS: http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/10/meet-badbios-the-mysterious-mac-and-pc-malware-that-jumps-airgaps/ In 2015, Kaspersky Labs uncovered malware that resides in hard drive firmware: https://blog.kaspersky.com/equation-hdd-malware/7623/


3

I believe that you are asking if a side-channel can be used to extract information from encrypted communications without breaking the encryption. Specifically, can detecting the number of ongoing communication channels provide you with information? The answer is absolutely. Note that I don't know how UK police radios work or whether what you propose is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included