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Department of Defence mark their old HDDs for, magnetization or incineration. As hard drives are coated with cobalt oxide and Iron, you could simply place the hard drive platter in a solution capable of stripping the surface of the disk. This is merely a matter of being creative, and remember: throwing the drive into a river would do little but delay the ...


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Basically you cannot win against malicious firmware. For anything on the disk, you can boot up a Linux from a CD or USB stick, and proceed to carpet the disk with zeros with a subtle dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda. For firmware, you are out, unless you unsolder all the Flash chips, flash them with code of your own, and solder them back -- not a realistic ...


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An RSA token might be another option. This requires the user to enter an OTP which is displayed on the RSA token. Works well but is not inexpensive.


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In addition to sebastians answer you might also consider not using yubicos backend server but to run your own system, so that the authentication request is not forwarded to yubico but handled on your own system or within your own (your customers) subnet. Alas, you need to install/run such a backend system. Yubico themself provide an authentication server but ...


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I would then suggest Yubikey ( http://www.yubico.com ). Yubikey is a OTP hardware token that does pretend to be a keyboard (Thus requiring NO extra software installation), and then sends a 128 bit encrypted secret to the server. The tokens are fully programmable by the administrator, and its possible to use the token in a variety of ways. You could either ...


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The CryptoStick uses the Web Cryptography API to expose a keys to the browser. Its likely that the proposed USB security token product product would use a similar technique. CryptoStick is open source, so it is easy for 3rd parties to verify it's security. The 2-factor authentication that I use regularly is Google Authenticator, which makes it very easy ...


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The AES competition received 15 candidates, two of which suffered from "academic breaks" (weaknesses that are only theoretical, but still demonstrate that the underlying block cipher is not "optimally secure"). The remaining 13 are, to my knowledge, still unbroken to this day. Therefore, the choice of Rijndael had to be done for reasons other than security. ...


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You'd probably have to go around a lot of places to get anything specific, but since you are talking about hardware-based exploits, you're going to want to look for physical bugs. There's a great article I read from spiderlabs about some stuff like this: http://blog.spiderlabs.com/2014/03/detecting-surveillance-state-surveillance-part-1-hardware-impants.html ...



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