Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Not really, or at least it is very hard. Recently a research paper on Stealthy Dopant-Level Hardware Trojans was published which shows how to include a Trojan into hardware that is so hard to detect that even if we optically compared the chip to a non-tampered unit we wouldn't find it. Read the abstract of the paper for an overview and if you want to know ...


0

There's also the cpuid utility available on a number of OS's. cpuid | grep -i aes AES instruction = true


0

What you're describing is pretty much what "truted computing" is about: a tamper-resistant TPM chip contains an RSA key baked into it by the manufacturer. You can achieve similar result using other type of tamper-resistant cryptographic storage (HCM, smartcards, DRM dongle, etc) where private keys are stored on specialized hardware and, theoretically, ...


0

Assuming your mystery USB audio device is based on the CMedia CM108 chipset (or even if it isn't, since there's not much variation in cheap USB audio devices), the HID device is for optional volume-control buttons; the manufacturer of your device decided not to hook the relevant chip pins up to actual buttons. The other three interfaces are audio in, audio ...


2

In the TRNG construction, the rings do not have a common enable signal, the only point in time where they are synchronized is at power up. Then they run freely, each at its own pace. This does not create a great deal of randomness per se but that does generate a lot of glitches at the flipflop inputs. The hope is create more randomness out of meta-stability. ...


2

Currently, the YubiKey can be setup by the user during configuration so that it is write protected. This is so the device cannot be compromised by some sort of malicious script being loaded onto it, it's also to prevent the integrity of the key being compromised as well. Although, if someone has the physical device, then really there is no need to go any ...


0

By performing a large file (1GB) copy from C:\ to WD My Passport drive, before and after applying password, it can be seen that either encryption is always performed or NOT at all performed and only password flag is applied within disk. The copying speed was same. I think I have wasted my money on this hardware encrypting drive. I think, the choice of ...


-1

If you're concerned about BadUSB and similar attacks, you'll just need to resort to checking all of your ports every time you come back after leaving your computer unattended. Do note, however, that even this doesn't protect you from BadUSB. BadUSB means I can take a normal piece of USB equipment, flash custom firmware on it, and wreak havoc with it. This ...


4

Be careful with the word "unrecoverable". It depends what level of "unrecoverable" you are going for. If you want to stop a casual computer user from reading your data from a live-boot OS, then things like shred, dd, dban will do the trick. If, however, you are worried about someone flashing the firmware of your drive, or removing the platters and putting ...


1

Use dban if you are using a regular harddisk (e.g. non SSD), it can be found at http://www.dban.org/ and should make it unrecoverable. DBAN is free erasure software designed for the home user. It automatically deletes the contents of any hard disk that it can detect. This method can help prevent identity theft before recycling a computer.



Top 50 recent answers are included