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0

Yes, because they are not referring to the "RTC clock" only when they refer to "clockskew". The clocks they mention are the Crystals that "clock" the logic. so the CPU,clock. the Memory clock, the network clock, etc. the RTC is the only clock that really gets influenced by an NTP service.


0

The only thing I can think of that might be considered tamper-proof is a memory cell (SD-RAM or alike) with a "reset when line break" lock (triggered by resistance change and line break) that is contained in a liquid like phosphor, which is contained in a liquid oxidizer (a.k.a. instant flash when opened with thermal reaction preventing "cold save" of the ...


0

I don't think you will discover that kind of thing via Google as you have moved into the realm of the security services. Certainly, I'm sure that someone is using that kind of tamper evident hardware somewhere though it is pretty extreme! Of course, being electronics, there are other potential risks that would not require physical tampering in order to ...


2

The device looks like a FM antenna; there were also some 3G/LTE routers that look almost like that (now they're mostly soapbar or cube shaped, it seems). It has happened to me to be connected to a WiFi and a cell network, or run diagnostics on one while connected to the other. And fiddling with a cell antenna's position in the hope of getting better ...


114

Perhaps he was using one of these wireless chargers that are built into the tables. It certainly fits your description.


5

If your laptop has an RFID/NFC reader (some Dell laptops have them) then yes an antenna can be used to "talk" to the laptop and exploit a vulnerability in the reader's driver, but readers are usually placed near the touchpad rather than behind the laptop, and while this antenna can most likely send any data to the reader, I doubt it's sensitive enough to ...


6

Although I agree with the other posters that the device in question probably was not a hack attempt, I disagree with their conclusion that he was not trying to hack you. In fact, I recommend adopting the strategy that everybody is trying to hack your equipment. That sounds paranoid, but it leads to the type of security that is more difficult (i.e. ...


134

No, you are just being paranoid. You were probably already connected to him over WiFi. There are many attacks he could have run this way without additional devices. Also if he would have wanted to hack you, he would not have thrown his strange hacking device in your face. He would have hidden it below the table. Side note: I feel like most of the people ...


36

I don't know what that gizmo is, but unless you've got a really bizarre laptop, it wouldn't be useful for attacking your computer. Outside of a laboratory setting, attacking a computer means using its standard input or output capabilities. An ordinary wifi or Bluetooth antenna can reach your laptop from anywhere in the room; a directional antenna can ...


11

As @cremefraiche said, the object fits the profile of an wireless iPod/iPhone charger. As the coil works as an antenna, it could theoretically be used to send data from the device. To investigate if this device is charger or a surveillance bug, you can try to pry it open. If the 30-pin connector has anything else than the power-lines connected, it is ...


0

Generally on a computer, software encryption often runs on shared architecture such as your computers CPU. True hardware encryption would run on something like a Secure Cryptoprocessor or similar dedicated chipset. This can help isolate secure procedures from the rest of the system and often have architecture to very quickly run the needed calculations. ...


1

Ultimately, there is no difference: both "type" of encryption will end up running some software on top of some hardware so this is mostly a marketing argument. How an encryption stack works exactly depends, of course, from case to case and it is very important to review the details. For instance, some hard drive will implement some encryption layer in the ...


0

Hardware based encryption has several advantages: Speed - hardware encryption works much more faster than software one. Independence - it's independent from host system - OS, drivers, etc. Separate processor for number generation is also big plus. Security - More secure against malware, brute force attacks, cold boot attack, etc.


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This question is likely going to get flagged since it is vendor specific however I will take some time to answer your questions using a security approach. It's free and and open source - there is a cost associated with learning any tool and implementing it properly. There is also a cost associated with support. At crunch time, using an open source model, ...



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