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1

A lot of anti-malware 'heuristic'-engines do this kind of stuff. They check entropy of chunks of code, or even the entire PE. Lots of malware is obfuscated to exist longer in the wild. The problem with this kind of detection is that is works poorly with smart-er attackers. eg when I write exploits, I randomize everything keep things small and you will ...


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As said on the link you point to, this vulnerability concerns only pre-2003 versions of Microsoft LSASS. It also says that some worms are known to try and exploit this vulnerability to propagate. Essentially, they just try and send a request to your OS's Local Security Authority Directory Service (whatever that is, it's probably built-in many Windows ...


2

The page lists the affected systems and your windows 7 32bit is not included: Affected Avaya DefinityOne Media Servers Avaya IP600 Media Servers Avaya S3400 Message Application Server Avaya S8100 Media Servers Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server SP1, SP2, SP3, SP4 Microsoft Windows 2000 Datacenter Server SP1, SP2, SP3, SP4 Microsoft Windows 2000 ...


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There are many cheap stress-testing services that offer a variety of attack vectors to attack with. Once you purchase a membership, you simply login to their website and input your site's URL/IP address and chose an attack method (UDP, SYN, HTTP, ect) Note that these services are usually illegally ran by teenagers trying to make a couple bucks. ...


3

I think you can safely live normally ;) The user in this forum propably just took a guess on your UserAgent. This is neither considered hacking nor does it do any damage on your pc. There is even a Website telling you what OS you use, only by visiting it. There are also more informations about how this is working.


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I wouldn't be overly concerned. There are plenty of ways he could possibly have found your operating system, a lot of them not considered malicious and are done directly through the browser without any form of exploit. For example this information could come from your user agent: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_agent Through the user agent they could ...


2

I'm not sure with pfsense, but this is possible with psad: psad makes use of Netfilter log messages to detect, alert, and (optionally) block port scans and other suspect traffic. For tcp scans psad analyzes tcp flags to determine the scan type (syn, fin, xmas, etc.) and corresponding command line options that could be supplied to nmap to generate such a ...


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Two answers to this question: You can't Port Knocking Services exist to be connected to. If you have a service, then you need to allow clients to connect to it, and once you do that, it is open to be 'enumerated'. You can't block someone from trying a service to see if it responds because you need that ability for clients to connect to you. ... Unless ...


2

Sorry but this view that Linux is by default more secure than Windows is wrong. Does GnuTLS mean anything to anyone? How about all of the issues in OpenSSL recently? Vulnerabilities affect Linux just as much as Windows. More so in some cases. In general, as long as you are keeping your OS and applications patched, you are doing the first few things right. ...


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Also council move to Linux, I probably will describe a couple of programs that will definitely help improve of the home PC a little bit. Tripwire Secure Cheq - just download and run this app and it will show you some of weak places. Set up enterprise firewall (default sucks, but better than nothing) Enable UAC Install and configure EMET with "maximum" ...


2

Network IDS's tend to run passively, so they don't respond to network traffic: they just listen. No way to get it to respond in such a way as to determine that it is running, what kind, or what version. You'd need to go a different route to glean that info.



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