Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Https is http via TLS/SSL. TLS provides three things: Data encryption Server authentication (the server is who they say they are) Client authentication (the client is who they say they are) To achieve 1) a self-signed certificate is enough, but for 2) you need a certificate that is signed by a certificate authority known to the client (your browser). ...


18

Even if you see a message saying the connection is not trusted does not mean it is not an HTTPS connection. In order to display or not such error messages, browsers try to validate certificates using following criteria: Does the certificate common name match the domain name entered in the URL bar? Is the current date between validity start date and ...


12

The error message you got is the normal behavior of browsers when dealing with self-signed certificates because your self signed certificate can not say who the recipient of the data (your server) really is (trust), so you got that message asking you if you are sure you trust your website (serever). Anyway since your browser can't verify that you are ...


3

One possible solution for you is to install your self signed certificate as a Trusted Root CA on your notebook. See, https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc754841.aspx#BKMK_addlocal This will fix the problem you are describing (on that laptop only and only for browsers/other software that uses roots trusted by the OS, i.e. Firefox will still ...



Top 50 recent answers are included