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Yes. Just having a file on your hard drive does nothing. However, note that there may be potential for execution. Suppose the exploit was inside a .pdf, and opening it by a vulnerable reader results in code execution. It is possible that although you don't open it in your pdf viewer, just by opening its folder a plugin intended to create a thumbnail opens ...


3

Generally speaking, you are correct. Let's look at some exceptions: If the malware exploits a vulnerability in your email program. If the malware exploits a vulnerability in the software used to "unzip" it. If the malware exploits a vulnerability in the software used to view its contents (ie Windows Explorer). If the malware exploits a vulnerability in the ...


2

Potentially yes. Examples: You download a picture. While you never open the picture, the OS may generate thumbnails for it. If there's a bug (vulnerability) in the thumbnail generator, it may result in code execution. You download a document. While you never open the document yourself, the Search Indexer reads the file to speed up finding documents. If ...


0

Malicious code needs to be run by your computer, but sometimes you don't have to open the file in order for it to be run. Some browsers can be infected by drive-by-downloads, which infect your machine simply by browsing. But, for your specific question, if you downloaded a file, it will not infect you until you open/run it.



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