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I searched further about your issue and I found that an attacker used an opensource webshell application to execute shell on your server in a variety of common scripting languages such as ASP,ASPX,PHP,JSP,PL and Python. A quick study of that script lead me to know that: $mujj = $_POST['x']; if ($mujj!="") { This checks the password (password to ...


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It's a PHP shell that reads and evaluates (runs) PHP commands sent to the shell via base64-encoded HTTP-POST messages. It needs some value for x to pass the check, and then the b64-encoded PHP commands sent through the z0 value.


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Stripping out HTML tags is not a sufficient approach to protecting yourself from XSS. Consider the following input: <scri<script>pt> If you strip out the <script> tag, another script tag is created. This is just one example - there are many other attacks that could be used. You should look into protecting yourself from XSS on the ...


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There are two main methods that are commonly discussed when dealing with user input. These two methods are validation and sanitisation. Both of these should be most definitely done on the server side. Client side protections will not prevent attacks such as cross-site scripting or SQL injection. In particular, I think you're talking about cross-site ...


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I think you should send %E5%98%8D%E5%98%8A, not %E5%98%8A%E5%98%8D. Otherwise both tokens get expanded and you probably end up with an extra newline. On the other hand, the extra newline apparently is not interpreted at all, so I'm wondering if your exploit is indeed working, or whether you're seeing your own payload echoed back harmlessly to you and then ...


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You should definitively restrict the range of your question and update the title accordingly. I'm answering here to your last question "has there been any successful injection attacks using camera input ?". Yes, I think you can say so. I'm particularly referring to a vulnerability which affected Google glasses. The Google glass would detect and handle ...


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I would try to just do something like this: http://www.example.com/somepage.php?page=%0d%0aContent-Type: text/html%0d%0aHTTP/1.1 200 OK%0d%0aContent-Type: text/html%0d%0a%0d%0a%3Chtml%3E TEST TEXT %3C/html%3E to start with. Then, if you see 2 different responses, and one of them is a 200, and if you see the text, you can then try whatever stuff with ...


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It's impossible to say from your "screenshot" above, but I'd say you're not getting back 0x0D 0x0A after the location, but instead the high bytes you've sent (0x8A 0x8D), including your Set-Cookie. And you're not interpreting the returned high bytes as CRLF either, so your user agent interprets the Set-Cookie as the non-host-part of the URL. Try switching ...



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