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Are you defending against an attacker with full access to the device? If so, a credential encrypted with a PIN code (which implies it consists of only 4 or 6 digits) is very easy to decrypt - a maximum of only 10,000 or 1,000,000 tries and you're there. I would recommend verifying the PIN that the user entered against the server for authentication, and ...


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What I would do is: Close all apps in the App Switcher. Close all tabs in Safari. Ensure "Block Pop-ups" is enabled in Settings > Safari and "Clear History and Website" while you're there. Go to Settings > General > Device Management and delete any profiles you don't recognize. Clear the RAM on the iPad. Hold down the power button until the "Slide To Power ...


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This might not be exactly what you're looking for but... Having your iPhone near your keyboard can make you vulnerable to keylogging. Before you call me crazy, I've actually conducted this experiment using neural networks and an Android's accelerometer and it could 80% guess what region of the keyboard the key press came from and could guess within a few ...


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To answer your explicit questions: Basically you need to create a certificate sign request (CSR) which then will be used by a certificate authority of your choosing to create the actual certificate. Creating a CSR can be done by multiple ways, some CAs actually have own tools that are very user friendly. Well the thing to do is checking out various CA's ...


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Beware that "stock" firmware/image can be infected too, especially if we're talking about some (usually cheap) chinese devices. Secondly, you could try to monitor it's traffic after reflashing/reimage it. But there's no real guarantee that it will not perform new, unwanted or undetected "things". If the manufacturer is a trusted one, there's little chance ...


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The clipboard indeed cannot be considered a safe place, this for several reasons: Malware accessing the clipboard content: in your question you focused on malware installed in your machine, however there could be transient malware (like a malicious Adobe Flash banner on a website you visited for instance...) which will not infect your computer when run, ...


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When malware is present on the device, indeed, having the pasteboard store this data would be the least of your worries. However, this is still bad practice. You should not store important user data in the clipboard. You shouldn't even be putting it in the pasteboard/clipboard anyway. Why? Because a malicious application could access your clipboard data. ...



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