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Having multiple JREs on a system isn't in and of itself a risk, but the risk that they might be invoked by untrusted code is present. So the key to this setup is likely to be ensuring that the outdated JREs can only be invoked by the application that you need it to and not by any untrusted code. Exactly how you achieve this depends on the application that ...


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Possibly partial answer. First an aside: you don't need to "secure" a public key by changing bits; the whole purpose and point of public-key cryptography is that it is secure even though the public key is public, which includes available to adversaries. That publickey form you have is NOT just "modulus and exponent". It is true that the last 3 bytes in ...


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As in always in security, what threat are you attempting to protect against? It seems from the question you are worried about availability. Typically a hash table will have limiting performance of O(1) for simple operations, but degrade to worst case of O(n). (See Secure Coding Guidelines for Java SE .) Say, will a web server use resources disproportionate ...


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I am going to answer your question with a barrage of other questions. Well does your app actually need to hit the open internet ? or can it simply exist on a company intranet? The majority of 'java exploits' are simply ways that java's sandbox can get broken out of and of little consequence to legitimate java applications since it is really a apples and ...


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There are two different types of hash functions: (non-cryptographic) hash functions cryptographic hash functions The cryptographic hash functions make specific security promises, such as being hard to invert, hard to create collisions, and such. Regular non-cryptographic hash functions, such as the one used in java.util.HashMap, are designed to be as ...


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HashMaps aren't really used for security purposes. They're just used for mapping unique keys to objects. This depends on the object that you're using in your HashMap. Each object should define it's own public int hashCode() function. This function is applied to each object when putting it into a HashMap. It's up to the developer to ensure that their ...


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It uses hashCode() function. A plain and short explanation of how this function works can be read here and a pseudo implementation is here.



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