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Note: Java/JSSE doesn't implement real SSLv2 (only hello) so no need to disable it. As the linked article says, recent updates disable SSLv3 by default, but you can re-enable it; try not to. Attacks: I don't think there are any direct attacks from v2Hello, but there may be functional limitations. Primarily it prevents use of extensions, some of which are ...


0

When do I escape the data? Basically, as late as possible. The database is somewhere to store data, it is not a place to encode (escape) data. Of course use parameterised prepared statements to prevent any SQL injection attacks, but that should be as far as you take it. Your goal for writing to the database is simply to store the data successfully and ...


1

An Android client application should not be vulnerable to CSRF attacks (except for a browser application like Chrome, but it is not the application here that is vulnerable, it is the website being browsed). This is because for an CSRF to succeed, the client needs to be able to send cookies to the vulnerable website. An Android application would only access ...


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Most of the Android applications are written in Java. As long as you don't use native code, it's not possible to cause buffer overflow or memory corruptions. In android it's possible to use native code and compile them using Android NDK [1]. Applicqtions like Firefox and Chrome are using native codes. Many opensource libraries can be compiled for android ...


2

The generic answer for "is my code vulnerable to directory traversal?" is to ask yourself if your code: Uses filename strings that you got from an untrusted source to read/write files on disk? "Untrusted sources" could be direct user input, things you read from files (which could have been tampered with), or from 3rd party code that your code interacts ...


0

SQLite supports prepared queries and bound parameters, so the issue is more with the use of the tool, rather than the tool itself. If query parameters are used it's impossible to inject SQL into the process because the data is handled separately from the statement. The issue only arises if the developer has done something like: SQLStatement = "select * ...


1

SQL injection attacks apply when an application uses SQL and carelessly assembles SQL requests with attacker-provided elements. Here, "carelessly" means "without using prepared statements". Prepared statements are the correct way to do SQL with externally provided data; many developers try to think of it in terms of "escaping quoting characters", which is a ...


1

logjam is not (even remotely) a break of the Diffie-Hellman key exchange method. It is a weakness of the TLS protocol. It affects only sessions, not credentials. It will soon be fixed. I estimate zero impact on OpenID. The "bad guys" cannot do MITM, only governments and ISPs could (in principle) do MITM.


5

The easiest way to understand the vulnerability is to look at the diff, dig through the code, and work out how you might exploit it. The vulnerable method's signature looks like this: status_t GraphicBuffer::unflatten( void const*& buffer, size_t& size, int const*& fds, size_t& count) { The important arguments here are void ...


1

While I'm unfamiliar with this specific vulnerability, I can answer this question in general. What exactly does this mean: A remote user can send specially crafted data to trigger an integer overflow in GraphicBuffer::unflatten() This does not mean that a remote attacker can somehow make a remote procedure call on GraphicBuffer::unflatten. It means ...


0

Yes, you are right, all it does is it moves the issue to another place. There are several ways to protect the password of the Keystore using PBKDF2. Using a password that is needed at start up of the application server(as you mention). Composing the password of PBKDF2 out of 'things' you know about your deployment environment; for example: concatenating ...


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You are correct @Numeron, the purpose of the \000 is to add a null to the end of the password stream (NULL value or END-OF-FILE value) since the null is an illegal character for a password (or any user input for that matter) it is used here to signify the end of the 'password' string (this is part of normal string behavior). the minor you see is comes ...


2

I continued my own investigation... \ is an escape character in java, but one thing I didn't realise is that it can escape more than one character. In this case, it escapes all three zeroes, thus adding a NUL character onto the string. This turns into an extra byte on the end of the UTF8 array, with value 0. This is presumably used by the algorithm to ...


-1

If we don't try to delete it but override it with meaningless value, it is easier. Even string.value can be override by useless char set.


1

There are evidences that malware authors are moving from Java to Flash due to the fact that IE, FireFox and chome now all blocks unpatched versions of the JVM plugin from running (chrome blocks the in-browser java browser alltogether unless the user manually enables NPAPI). This move has reduced the usefulness of Java exploits (and therefore, DBD). And ...


1

Found the answer myself in RFC4253: Signatures are encoded as follows: string signature format identifier (as specified by the public key/certificate format) byte[n] signature blob in format specific encoding. The "ssh-dss" key format has the following specific encoding: string "ssh-dss" mpint p mpint q ...


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If by "virus" you mean "self replicating code" then of course it can be written in any language. Once upon a time, I wrote a virus that propagated via Pascal as an educational experiment to show this very point, actually. It consisted of an executable subroutine. What the subroutine did was: search the local disk for files with an extension of .pas copy ...



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