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As in always in security, what threat are you attempting to protect against? It seems from the question you are worried about availability. Typically a hash table will have limiting performance of O(1) for simple operations, but degrade to worst case of O(n). (See Secure Coding Guidelines for Java SE .) Say, will a web server use resources disproportionate ...


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I am going to answer your question with a barrage of other questions. Well does your app actually need to hit the open internet ? or can it simply exist on a company intranet? The majority of 'java exploits' are simply ways that java's sandbox can get broken out of and of little consequence to legitimate java applications since it is really a apples and ...


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There are two different types of hash functions: (non-cryptographic) hash functions cryptographic hash functions The cryptographic hash functions make specific security promises, such as being hard to invert, hard to create collisions, and such. Regular non-cryptographic hash functions, such as the one used in java.util.HashMap, are designed to be as ...


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HashMaps aren't really used for security purposes. They're just used for mapping unique keys to objects. This depends on the object that you're using in your HashMap. Each object should define it's own public int hashCode() function. This function is applied to each object when putting it into a HashMap. It's up to the developer to ensure that their ...


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It uses hashCode() function. A plain and short explanation of how this function works can be read here and a pseudo implementation is here.


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A few reasons: Buying a certificate would leave a paper trail, allowing malware to be more easily backtraced to the person that paid for the certificate. It increases the barrier to entry for creating malicious Java applets, because of the cost. I believe CAs (e.g. VeriSign) require you to provide evidence that you are a legitimate provider of software. ...


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This is a session fixation vulnerability, even if it may be relatively difficult to exploit. You make a lot of assumptions before you conclude that everything is fine. Your assumptions are: “An attacker cannot set a cookie in the victim's browser, except through an XSS vulnerability.” “There are no XSS vulnerabilities anywhere in my application.” “IP ...


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In order to get those hashes, you need samples of the malware that you want to detect. That is one of the reasons why AV companies have very large teams to hunt for and identify malware, and why their database of hashes tends to be guarded. For your project, you will need to find (or write) malware and collect those hashes.


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Classical IDS work at the network layer and thus cannot handle encrypted connections like HTTPS which happen at the application or presentation layer (see OSI model). But, since you are interested only in detecting attacks by checking HTTP header fields (i.e. attacks at the application layer) you could built a (transparent) HTTP proxy instead and then do ...


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According to NIST - Special Publication 800-94 Guide to Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems (IDPS)1: Network-based IDPSs cannot detect attacks within en crypted network traffic, including virtual private network (VPN) connections, HTTP over SSL (HTTPS), and SSH sessions. As previously mentioned, some network-based IDPSs can do some ...


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Edit: just so I preempt comments along the lines you know nothing about how IPS works, I will stipulate that, and instead direct my answer towards the general method of inspecting HTTPS traffic. The short is answer is you can't. The long answer is you would have to perform MITM attacks against the connections. This can be done in cases when you only have ...



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