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1

Here's how it works in a nutshell: 1) The client connects to the server. The server advertises the SSL/TLS protocols that it supports, and sends its SSL certificate to the client. The certificate includes an RSA public key, and the certificate is (presumably) signed by a recognized CA that the client trusts. 2) The client verifies the certificate's CA ...


0

I am surprised that people haven't noted that you can and should encrypt the verifier in the db. Typically with large firms the databases are segregated infrastructure. The backup regime of the database servers is also usually deliberately different than the host level backups of the applications servers and web infrastructure. Db backups are usually offsite ...


3

The "padding oracle" attack you are talking about is better known as Bleichenbacher's attack against RSA. The attacker sends malformed encrypted keys; some will still (by pure chance) happen to decrypt properly, albeit with a decrypted content that the attacker cannot know. If the server's behaviour changes, depending on whether the decryption failed ("bad ...


7

The whole point of all encryption is that it's safe for the attacker to get your ciphertext, because they don't have the key. This is true for public-key encryption as well; it's perfectly safe for you to broadcast your ciphertext to the world, and certificates aren't related to that in any way. The reason you use certificates in public-key cryptography is ...


3

This in an interesting problem; with only symmetric encryption, how do you secure a communication channel (ensuring both privacy and authentication)? Researchers have been working on the problem for centuries and the best solution they've come up with is: Public Keys! That's a tongue-in-cheek way of saying that authentication is a fundamental problem in ...


2

Wireless networks that do not ask for password sen data over the air unencrypted and anyone can : Scan your pc/phone to actively try to exploit a component in your hardware all data via http:// e.g cookies,downloads,images,passwords and email sent Do Arp Spoofing Additionally you can't even be sure that the Wi-fi network is legitimate. That's all i ...


10

an open wireless connection means there is no password exchange required to connect to the network. most data used over an open wireless connection is easily observed. once connected however, there are ways to encrypt your data such as using a vpn. This would allow data to be encrypted over an open wireless connection like public hotspots. though an observer ...


20

Yep. Open wireless networks are entirely unencrypted; anyone can see all the data you send (even if they aren't connected to the network).



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