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1

Your benchmark is possibly incomplete. I have a server which features a CPU reported as: "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 V2 @ 3.10GHz". It has four cores. On that machine, OpenSSL 1.0.1f reports (with openssl speed ecdhp224) that it can perform 9096 ECDH instances per second, using the NIST P-224 curve (a fine curve, of security rated at "112 bits", comparable ...


2

It will take a long time doing useless computation. One could conceivably use a designated-verifier non-interactive computationally zero-knowledge argument that the rest of the message is well-formed. More usefully, use proofs of work and PKE with fast decryption.


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Constructing elliptic curves is computationally more expensive than choosing DH parameters. Constructing an elliptic curve is not a trivial task. I would recommend taking a look at the following question and the responses: Can custom elliptic curves be used in common TLS implementations?. As is mentioned in that thread, you are likely to run into ...


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E.g. finnish Pohjola bank uses one-time pads. I got first one through normal snailmail and I have gotten new ones when I visit the bank. One list has 350 entries and I need one to sign up and another for accepting the payment of bills. If the amount is larger (thousands of euros) the bank sends as a textmessage the information which one-time number I choose. ...


2

You want mutual authentication between client and server. As per the SSL/TLS protocol, this is supported with client certificates. Both the server and the client have a certificate; the server shows its certificate to the client, and then requests the client to show its own certificate and prove control of the corresponding private key. This works, this is ...


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Though a weak RNG is a problem for ECDSA, this can be fixed in two ways: By using a non-weak RNG (that's not that hard, on modern computers; it is cheap embedded systems who may have trouble obtaining a decent source of randomness). By using derandomization, as described in RFC 6979. This is compatible with ECDSA (uses the same public and private key ...


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In answer to question 2, you could use RSA instead for the signature algorithm. While people are moving to ECDSA due to it being faster, there's nothing inherently wrong with RSA still.



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