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Using the same private key across separate domains is basically secure. If you authenticate to a system, you don't give away you private key, and that system cannot impersonate you. So you can use your key across work and personal systems, and a work system cannot then access your personal systems. However, there are often reasons to use different keys. For ...


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The problem with this approach is that the same identity is used by every destination, so sites can swap notes to see where you've been and draw correlations that you may not want to expose. There are several ways to solve this issue, such as the one used in the FIDO U2F security key. In this case, the device contains a symmetric key (not an asymmetric key ...


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I assume that your ISOs a provided with a hash in order to verify their integrity right? Just grab the hash along with the ISO, write that sucker down on a piece of paper (yes it's long, just do it). When you've burned your DVD, pop it into another system and generate an ISO based off the DVD using the dd command (unlikely anyone would compromise dd in ...


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Checking for primality of the two required primes usually takes the longest. Note that the time required to find a prime depends a lot on luck. If the prime is close to the starting point it can be almost instantaneous. If it is much further away it may take quite a bit of time. There is however one other component that may be completely detrimental towards ...


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I just wrote a web-based client certificate utility that is entirely cross browser (does require modern browsers tho). It allows users to do single-password authentication and single-click auth. Your keys get encrypted with your single password, so you're a bit safer than <keygen> keys (since those aren't password protected). Users will eventually be ...



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