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3

In some versions of GPG, the default KDF is PBKDF-SHA1, which will result in a 160-bit key, I am unsure what the default KDF is for each version, however their website man page says it is RIPEMD-160 (for the current version I assume). You can change the default to the more secure SHA512 using the command --s2k-digest-algo SHA512, which should result in a ...


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Meta: Doesn't add much to the dupe but on rereading I notice I missed the "D". Key establishment and encryption/decryption and authentication processes for TLSv1.2 are specified in RFC 5246 TLSv1.2 plus for ECC key exchanges (not here) RFC 4492 TLS ECC as amended by appendix A.7 of 5246. These processes also apply to DTLSv1.2 RFC 6347 DTLSv1.2, although the ...


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Key authentication (using a cipher key, not a physical key) is a secure way to authenticate. Only your machine should have the private key needed to complete the key pair and thus authenticate. Password authentication (using physical keys on a keyboard) is considered insecure since it can be brute-forced or someone looking over your shoulder when you type ...


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Yes, as long as it is the same algorithm. Just calling the default “random number” function of a programming language, even with the same seed and number of ticks from start, may or may not produce the same result in different versions of the runtime environment, because the algorithm may become replaced. So if your program relies on this to work properly, ...


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Yes. This is the fundamental point of a lot of 2-factor authentication tokens. The assumption that using the same algorithm, with the same secret starting conditions will cause the mobile device to output the same as the central device, so someone can enter the value on their screen, and it'll match what the central system says.



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