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You can use Forward-Secure Public Key Encryption. Alternatively, you can use Identity-Based Encryption or Certificateless Encryption. (or even forward-secure IBE)


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Since you generate the user-specific keys, you can also keep a copy of these keys somewhere (somewhere safe, preferably) and use them when needed. Alternatively, you can generate the keys with a cryptographic derivation system which uses a "superkey" and the user's identity. For instance, consider the following: The superkey is K. A user is identified ...


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The only way I can think of is to use asymmetric keys. Generate an asymmetric key pair KS on the server. Retain the private key from this pair and hand out the public key to every single user. Generate an asymmetric key pair KC for every single user. Let the user retain the private keys from their pairs and send the public keys to the server. Every time ...


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"Secure enough to use" -- secure enough to use for what? Are you a bank? Healthcare website? The "secure enough" question needs context and and understanding of your appetite for risk. If you sell $2 widgets and you're a daredevil then 10 charters is fine. If you're running something more sensitive and a 10-character token is going to keep you up at ...


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The "length" is a formal characterization of one of the mathematical values that constitute the key pair. Thus, the public and the private key don't have independent lengths per se; the private/public key pair has a length, which, by extension, is also said to be the length of the public key and of the private key. The length is not the actual bit length of ...



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