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Regarding the general managment of private/public keys, there are already other answered questions here on SE: What is the best practice: separate ssh-key per host and user VS one ssh-key for all hosts? and What's the common pragmatic strategy for managing key pairs? Regarding AWS specific details: you can and should create your own key pairs outside of AWS ...


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If you're (somewhat) sure that the key is not compromised, I'd simply create a bunch of subkeys and move whatever keys you want to smartcards or other offline places. Adding subkeys is easily possible by using gpg[2] --edit-key and the addkey commands. The usage flags are stored in a signature subpacket, so changing them does not change the key (with ...


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Using a symmetric password-based encryption scheme on the keys. Where you have to "enter your passphrase" before you are allowed to use the key. Since the passphrase is used to decrypt the actual key. Most of the security concerns about the usage of passphrases are discussed here: Security of passphrase-protected private key


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The expiration date of subkeys is stored in a special kind of signature issued by the primary master key on the subkey. With other words, if you change the expiration date, no private keys are changed at all. If you can restore the public key later (for example, fetching it from the key server network), you're fine.


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Here are some general considerations regarding bigger architecture in case more servers could be used to reduce attack surface. In the above scenario, if the single server is compromised, it may reveal sensitive data over period of time when admin users are logging-in. There could be two web servers - one for clients and one for admins There could be ...


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Certificate Pinning is another commonly used control against Data-in-transit attacks. The TLS handshake never starts if the client doesn't receive a Public Key that is within the client's (the mobile app) known Pin List. I used Cert Pinning as a compliment to payload encryption. Perhaps the following are becoming the base standard for sensitive mobile app ...



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