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70

Firstly, often encryption is terminated at the perimeter by infrastructure which is dedicated to offloading SSL decryption. It makes it much easier to manage when you only have maintain a high degree of key security for a small (proportionally) group of servers which are dedicated to the role. The rest of your regular application servers can operate like ...


43

Technically, changing your passphrase is sufficient if you don't also believe that your (password-protected) private key has also been leaked. Realistically, you might just want to replace your SSH key with a new one. They're so cheap they might as well be free, and it removes you from worrying about whether anyone has, is, or will be able to get a copy of ...


18

Changing the passphrase of an existing key can be done with: ssh-keygen -p ...you are however not done by now. You also have to take consider copies of your old keys, these need to be removed or it should be treated as compromised. Think of backups, but also data on filesystems (copy-on-write filesystems such as ZFS and btrfs could keep a copy somewhere ...


2

Owner and Signature Trust Signature trust means a user puts trust into the identity of another user. If Alice signs (or certifies, which is the term I will use from now on for signing other's keys) Bob's key, she declares (following whatever rules) she puts trust in his identity. These certifications are usually publicly available on the key servers. You ...


1

Yes, it is insecure to use http instead of https because it can be attacked by man-in-the-middle, by DNS spoofing or in other ways, so you get the wrong key and also wrong software. Checking the fingerprint of the key would not help either unless you got the fingerprint by https. And while it would be better to use https, it would not mean that TLS ...


1

This setup is trying to match domains and ssl keys. However, I would start by questioning what are ‘domains’ here why are they important. Could the domain simply be a hash of the ssl key? That way you no longer need the CA. How are the domains assigned? If they are centrally assigned, could the ssl signing be simply provided as one step of the domain ...


1

In light of the broad question I will concentrate on answering your more specific one regarding full access to the centralised server. I'll refer to said server as a CA because this is essentially what you are describing. TL; DR it depends Let's presume that full access means knowledge of the CA's private key. This may not always be the case if we consider ...


1

is it really necessary worrying about superusers? My gut feeling says no: in princible whathever the encryption method a superuser can read all the files and ultimately any kind of keys of the users; Kind of. Even if the file is encrypted and the decryption is only done within the process the superuser has on most systems access to the process memory ...


1

Yolen described his motivation with existing examples in presentaion of LISA 2013, "Managing Access Using SSH Keys". https://www.usenix.org/conference/lisa13/managing-access-using-ssh-keys https://www.usenix.org/sites/default/files/conference/protected-files/ylonen_lisa13_slides.pdf In the presentation as well as NISTIR 7966, they don't mentioned separate ...


1

First, it's no problem to use a different symmetric key for each document, generation is easy as you just have to generate a 16-64 byte random string, a matter of a millisecond (mostly). As threats I guess you consider your cloud hoster and anyone who can get their hands on the documents. The approach you propose should work. The document needs to be ...



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