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Taken from research!rsc: "Last week, Debian announced that in September 2006 they accidentally broke the OpenSSL pseudo-random number generator while trying to silence a Valgrind warning. One effect this had is that the ssh-keygen program installed on recent Debian systems (and Debian-derived systems like Ubuntu) could only generate 32,767 different ...


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Assuming you do have the resources to do it (perhaps you intentionally make it small enough to be feasable and thus insecure..), what format is it in?


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The important words in the articles you quote are "root access". The core of MacOS X is a Unix derivative, and "root" is Unix terminology for God. Or, at least, the super-privileged identity that can do anything. Well, it indeed can. If you think of your computer as a small country, and the attacker has some outsider intend on invading it, then a malware ...


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You want mutual authentication between client and server. As per the SSL/TLS protocol, this is supported with client certificates. Both the server and the client have a certificate; the server shows its certificate to the client, and then requests the client to show its own certificate and prove control of the corresponding private key. This works, this is ...


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A possibility would be to use 'sudo' (or a script / alias relying on it). Thanks to sudo, you can allow your users to temporarily use another (not necessarily root) in order to execute a very specific command: Create a new account which will own the private key, Configure sudo so your users can launch an SSH client using this account and its private key. ...


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It can actually be done. The instructions at atom.smasher.org/gpg/gpg-migrate.txt are now out of date. Try this. As always, make backups, because it's really easy to mess it up. So these are your 'old' keys: $ gpg -K ---------------------------------- sec 2048R/712A2BBD 2013-01-29 uid Test Key 1 ssb ...



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