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Since encryption and signatures are distinct operations, it makes sense to have distinct keys. This really boils down to the need for distinct lifecycle management characteristics (backup or not backup, that is the question). Supporting several types of keys theoretically allows for better interoperability: clients who know only RSA use the RSA key, while ...


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As per http://reverseengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/6043/extract-non-extractable-private-key-from-os-x-keychain, it appears that OS X 10.5 does not support kSecAttrIsExtractable dictionary key and the CSSM_KEYATTR_EXTRACTABLE bit. As such, it appears possible to copy login.keychain from OS X 10.9 to 10.5, and perform the p12 export.


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No. Just because there is an alias to something from an app's sandbox container does not mean the App has access to it -- that's still controlled by the app's entitlement list (and I strongly suspect Apple would reject any app that requested direct access to a user's keychain files). Also, even if it could access the file directly (as a non-sandboxed app ...


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"ProtonMail's segregated authentication and decryption system means logging into a ProtonMail account that requires two passwords. The first password is used to authenticate the user and retrieve the correct account. After that, encrypted data is sent to the user. The second password is a decryption password which is never sent to us. [The second password ...


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The encrypion is between Mobile station and BTS, not between two Mobile Station, the encryption will be only between A and B, where A is your phone and B your BTS.


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Apparently, the open source Security-framework has a check whether the key attributes are set to non-exportable. Overwriting these attributes would work. You can also try running your VPN/browser with a debugger and break on a function which uses the key. From there you can get a pointer to memory and extract the private key. lldb -- security export -k ...


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The general class of algorithms are called secret-strengthening protocols. The idea is that Alice has a weak secret, p, and by conducting a short handshake with Bob, who knows a strong secret, N, Alice derives a combined secret H(p,N) which is a strong secret. Secure Remote Password is an example of such a secret-strengthening protocol combined with a ...


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If you use PBKDF2 then you are using a salt, because that's how PBKDF2 is defined: it is a function which takes as input a password and a salt. So there is already a salt somewhere. Or else Bob is using a "fixed salt", i.e. not a salt at all, and we can say that Bob is not really running PBKDF2. Salts need not be secret. Their virtue is in being unique (as ...


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Taken from research!rsc: "Last week, Debian announced that in September 2006 they accidentally broke the OpenSSL pseudo-random number generator while trying to silence a Valgrind warning. One effect this had is that the ssh-keygen program installed on recent Debian systems (and Debian-derived systems like Ubuntu) could only generate 32,767 different ...



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