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Standardization Don't expect any clients to be able to read those user IDs. User IDs following the schema provided are not part of the standard and will very likely not be implemented. This is especially valid for providing mail addresses, which do have a formalized representation, including a mailto: prefix would break that. Arbitrary Strings are Allowed ...


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The private key is already encrypted. Encrypting it symmetrically once more wouldn't hurt though. After that the worry should be about physical security. Media durability and safety off site should be the main considerations. A usb key is probably ok for at least ten years as long as usb ports are available. Put the key in a safe place. A Safety deposit ...


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What would be the point of hashing the accessToken? We hash passwords because people reuse them everywhere. If they would not reuse passwords, we would not need to hash passwords, the application has been hacked after all (as the attacker gained access to the db), so all is already lost. accessTokens are not reused. and adding to security, are only used ...


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Kerberos has multiple mature, interoperable implementations on major platforms with active user communities and under continuous development (MIT Kerberos, Heimdal, Microsoft, Java), and through standard abstraction layers such as GSSAPI and SASL, it is easy to use Kerberos either directly or indirectly to secure many standard applications and protocols, ...


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The short answer is that it's possible there is no way to find out more details about this. You should definitely enable two-factor and change your password ASAP. That being said, I can give you a few suggestions if you want to try to find out more. Google deliberately masks source IPs in their SMTP headers to protect your privacy. This is why you see a ...


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is there any way to both sides share a secret key and then generates key pairs using it You can derive further keys from an initial shared key, there are various key derivation mechanisms that would allow you to do this, but you still have the problem of distributing the initial key. Anyone who intercepts this key could replicate the derivation process ...


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For #1 the usual answer would be to the store the key in an HSM (hardware security module). This is the only truly secure way to store a private key, as any keys simply stored on the hard drive will be compromised if your machine is compromised. Question #2 is what is usually solved by a PKI (public key infrastructure). Others have said that there is no ...


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As AJ Henderson has mentioned, if you need to use keys in this manner than they should really be stored in an HSM. If you are simply storing the keys on a separate server then this does not provide much, if any, additional security. If one of your servers is compromised then you have to assume that your other servers could be compromised as well, and once ...


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You should rework your entire system. It is inherently far less secure than it should be. There is no good reason that you should be storing encryption keys that could be used to impersonate your devices on your servers at all. Rather, you should be providing each device with a signed certificate (from one private CA that you can operate securely using CA ...


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For old protocols to be replaced by newer ones, it is not sufficient that the old protocol is inefficient, clunky, complex, and has more holes than Emmental cheese. That the new protocol is shiny, fast, simple, fashionable and secure does not ensure upgrade either. To really get rid of an old protocol, you must kill all the humans that have grown accustomed ...


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Advantage of Using Subkeys Using subkeys has the main advantage that in case you have to revoke them, you're not losing all reputation in the web of trust do not have to exchange new keys with other participants you're communicating with. For example, if you stored your subkeys (and your public primary key, not your secret primary key!) on a mobile phone ...


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Usually when generating keyrings the program will generate both an encryption key and a signature key in the public keyring. If you run gpg --edit-key KEYID it will probably show usage: SC and usage: E for your key and subkey respectively.


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I would suggest using a live-Linux-system, that is completely readonly. I would suggest using a USB memory with a physical write-protect switch, that prevents any modifications to the system (here is one: http://www.amazon.com/Kanguru-Flashblu-4GB-Flash-Drive/dp/B0012WDFV6/ref=pd_sim_e_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1XS70KSFXBNH0PFQF3T9 ). Some laptops have internal ...


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When you install the Linux OS, you have to assume that the software is the genuine one, free of backdoors. Linux distributions tend to use digital signature on packages; a digital signature does not guarantee absence of backdoor, but it prevents undetected alterations in transit: you know that the package you get is the one produced by the packager. Since ...



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