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42

if you do not trust the medium: do not enter sensitive information. typing in your password in some obscure way is just that: security through obscurity, which never works. other than that: you might be able to achieve some level of security in such open places if the password you entered changes for the next login, see one-time-passwords. (note: ...


42

These kinds of password entry systems are only good as long as the attackers do not adapt. It is a play in several acts: Bank Web sites use passwords which are entered the traditional way, with a keyboard. Key loggers appear, and harvest key strokes. After some cases of actual bank password theft, banks adapt. They implement "visual keyboards" in which the ...


40

This would greatly depend on the implementation of the keylogger. Some enterprise-level products do include rootkits which make the keylogger nearly impossible to detect, unless you know the product in use and its configuration. For an example, check out Spector Pro*. Also, as syneticon-dj notes, it's possible they may instead be using a hardware ...


22

It is possible for malware to persist across a re-format and re-install, if it is sufficiently ingenious and sophisticated: e.g., it can persist in the bios, in the firmware for peripherals (some hardware devices have firmware that can be updated, and thus could be updated with malicious firmware), or with a virus infecting data files on removable storage or ...


21

Malicious software that only logs keyboard strokes rarely exists in the wild. Most key loggers for graphical interfaces (e.g. Windows) are more sophisticated and log all user interaction including mouse, copy and paste events by hooking into the operating system. Key loggers are normally a small subset of a rootkit that may also include the ability to act ...


16

It is definitely possible for a slightly sophisticated attacker to leave malware outside the direct reach of the operating system. Reinstalling the operating system means a disk wipe at most. Even there, you need to be careful if you restore any data that may have been compromised. Malware can be stored in one of the many rewritable memories that lurk in ...


15

I can see two ways: Use some virtual keyboard solution. You can type your password with mouse-clicks, it will avoid keyboard logger (but may not avoid mouse-click based logger). However, it would be one level of security. You would just type a wrong password into the password box, select it with the mouse (replacing the wrong keys with the true); type the ...


15

If you can't be sure that your keystrokes aren't captured (and you can't), use any sort of two factor authentication. Make sure your password isn't useful by itself! The only way to be sure that your data is secure is to avoid entering "everything" into the suspicious machine. Given that keyloggers are your only concern (i.e. no sophisticated tracking ...


14

Create GMail account with no 2 step authorization (not from friend' laptop). Log in with you friend' laptop into GMail web interface (type username/pass manually). Create new mail with subj some reports from %companyname%, attach some dummy .docs and .pdfs, type "dave123@another-company-in-your-field.com" in "To:" field. Click "Send". Enable 2 step ...


14

Such protection mechanism you're describing could possibly be exploited by the IE mouse tracking flaw, an Internet Explorer vulnerability that allows an attacker to track your mouse cursor anywhere on the screen, even if the browser is not being actively used, and to me seems such password protection would be more at risk of being compromised than your ...


14

You can't ever be safe on hardware you don't control. A hardware keylogger could be mounted inside the chassis where you could not see it, or remove it. A software keylogger may not be detectable by any app that you could run (if you had enough user privileges to run any app). Network monitoring and sniffing of your web traffic would be completely ...


13

There several threats you are dealing with; but fundamentally what you are asking -- using potentially malicious hardware -- is unsafe and should be avoided for sensitive purposes. (E.g., try not to check into your bank account on vacation). However, if you are willing to take that risk but want to minimize it, here are your threats: Hardware keyloggers. ...


12

The graphical entry of passwords is initially an attempt to thwart keyloggers. When such things began to appear, keyloggers naturally evolved (the people who write keyloggers have not stopped developing them; they adapt to new conditions) and modern keyloggers are also mouseloggers which record, for each click, a partial snapshot of the screen (a small area ...


11

Carrier IQ is a rootkit previously installed by mobile phone operators on Android and on iOS 4 iPhones. It is capable of recording every keystroke on your virtual keyboard. See What risk does Carrier IQ pose, exactly?


11

No, anti-malware packages will not detect every form of keylogger. They will detect known ones by hashing, and some may detect certain keylogger-like behaviour via heuristic analysis. However, I strongly advise you against this. First off, it's insulting to your employees. If I found out my employer was doing such a thing, I'd resign on the spot. Secondly, ...


11

The keylogger looks to be sending email using Gmail but the SMTP communication is encrypted with TLS (SSL). Simple Mail Transfer Protocol Command Line: STARTTLS\r\n Command: STAR Request parameter: TLS Simple Mail Transfer Protocol Response: 220 2.0.0 Ready to start TLS\r\n Response code: <domain> Service ready (220) ...


10

The log on screen is created by the WinLogin process. If a program can bind to the WinLogon process then it can most definitely keylog your login password. The Metapreter Payload from the MetaSploit library is a good example of a tool capable of migrating into the logon process. You may look at "MetaSploit Unleashed", to learn how to compile Metapreter into ...


10

A lot of keyloggers are smart enough to catch this. Not only do they log the keys being physically pressed, but they also log the contents of password boxes whenever window messages are processed, or when browser forms are posted. They also often capture small blocks of the screen around the mouse cursor, to catch cases like this.


10

The class of malware which prevents itself or other programs from being seen is called rootkits. They work by replacing key system calls that are used to detect what is going on in the system. For example, when you go to Task Manager, Task Manager asks Windows for a list of programs running on the system, but suppose that another bad program was able to ...


9

In my experience, most anti virus/malware solutions don't complain about low-level-keyboard-hooks, which are the easiest way to create a keylogger. One of my most popular programs contained such a keyboard hook, and only one user told me about his firewall complaining. On the other hand, several other modules of it, which were pretty harmless, triggered ...


9

In order to understand why certain programs (malicious and non-malicious) are flagged by Anti-Virus software, we need to understand some of the basic principles that Anti-Virus software use. Access to unauthorized resources The Keyboard Hook As others have suggested, the keyboard hook is one of the first ways in which a primitive keylogger gets detected. ...


9

I was wondering exactly how powerful can keyloggers be? Extremely powerful. But the use of the term keylogger can be distracting so lets explore what a keylogger is. Back many decades ago computers had very small hard drives and little RAM, but lots of various cables and assorted adapters. The keyboard was connected to the computer tower with a 5-pin ...


8

Not really, at that point you are dealing with a compromised client and pretty much all bets are off. The best you can do is ensure the user is aware of the failure which will (hopefully) result in them asking questions or trying again. When a user connects the old user should be booted. This should make a legit user aware of the problem even if they ...


8

Your idea of fingerprinting is very similar to wireless signals intelligence in WWII. Both sides used to have whole departments whose role was to learn the code style, or "fist" of the opposing side's wireless operators. By tracking these profiles and using radio direction finding they gained a surprising amount of information about troop and vessel ...


8

"Secure Keyboard Entry" maps to the EnableSecureEventInput function whose concept is described here. Basically, applications don't access the hardware themselves; they obtain events (e.g. about key strokes) from the operating system. Some elements in the OS decides what application gets what events, depending on its access rights and GUI state (there are ...


7

There is a handy tool called prey that allows you to track your devices (laptops, tablets and smartphones) and reports back to you. If your device becomes missing you tell prey and it jumps into action. The device begins trying to 'phone home' and will report its IP and geolocation information. In the case of smartphones or laptops with built-in gps it ...


7

There are many ways to go about finding key loggers. Some are more time consuming than others and may also provide false-negative. Purchase a well known anti key logger software. Or take your chances with a free distribution. This is your first defense and the easiest thing you can do. A scanner may find suspicious files or process and flag them. At ...


7

The big problem you're going to run into if you're trying to find a keylogger by analyzing keypress latency is the monitor's refresh rate: most monitors only update 60 times per second. A good keylogger is only going to add a few microseconds of latency, so even before you take other sources of noise (such as scheduler randomness) into account, you're ...



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