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As you are able to to write your own keyboards for android it could be assumed that a keyboard could be written that functions like a normal keyboard while at the same time logging the input and passing it back to the attacker. Such an application shouldn't be to hard to write.


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Yes, it is possible to detect unknown keyloggers and other malware, usually through computer forensics (Volatility or EnCase are well-known software for doing that). Keylogger detection, as for viruses and other malwares, can basically be achieved through two methods (I simplify for answer's clarity) : Signature based detection Heuristic based detection ...


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In theory, you could stop all the applications that you know are generating network traffic, then write a small piece of code to simulate lots of key typing events and monitor the network traffic to look for increased chatter over the wire. Even if the traffic is encrypted and sent in bulk packages, you could still have get a general idea about what your ...


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Yes but normally not an easy task There is a framework exactly for this called Volatility: bunch of tools written in python it will crawl through the memory to determine if any keyloggers are running check it out at https://code.google.com/p/volatility/ hope that helps


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The key item is whether you know whether there is a keylogger (or have reasonable suspicion) or you just want a way to automatically detect it. In the first case an investigation is very likely to lead to something: data travelling back to the attacker (as others have pointed out), suspicious devices, evidence of tampering, and so on. In the latter case ...


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Yes. You could, for example, perform a code audit to identify software that is out of place. Or you might be able to detect the data as it travels back to the attacker.


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Yes you can record keystrokes by user on android device simply by reverse engineering the keyboard app . http://www.android-app-development.ie/blog/2013/03/06/inserting-keylogger-code-in-android-swiftkey-using-apktool/ Here is one example where attacker attaches malware to the famous swiftkey keyboard using apktool


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Stopping android to send keyboard keystrokes: A scenario for preventing the keyboard on sending would be by using a firewall. For NON-Rooted phones this ones should do the trick: NoRoot Firewall >> www.play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=app.greyshirts.firewall Mobiwol >> www.play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.netspark.firewall In this moment, ...


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Perhaps a physical device could be made to press keys on the keyboard faster than what a human hand can perform to generate an error which could be analyzed. Perhaps this error could be useful. No. You in fact can create such a device for about $2. Just connect an ATTiny45 and a few passives to your USB port and you can bit-bang USB over the GPIO pins. ...


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Looking into keystroke delays is not the correct way to identify a keylogger. Use process Explorer and review the existing processes. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx select columns - process timeline identify which process is starting with the computer that may be rouge. They often will highlight in various colors process ...


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Another answer to add to the chorus of "It won't work:" Its possible to create a keylogger that runs as the system user that simply acts as a separate daemon: a separate program that listens to all keypresses. Since the OS is ostensibly the first actor to "hear" a keypress and forwards that signal on to any listening program, any keylogger that doesn't ...


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Depending on the keylogger technology, yes, there is a particular situation where timing information might be able to yield that something changed. A USB keylogger that is implemented as a composite device or hub will add a delay when compared against the same system with no keylogger. You need to measure the timing in the host computer, though: ...


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Practically, this won't work. There are too many other things going on in a computer. When you press a key, the OS interprets the key press and then sends notifications to any applications that are paying attention to key presses. The problem is that at any given time, your computer is doing numerous different background activities. There is no ...


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Maybe this is something a bit higher than what most people on this site are able to answer because they have a weak background... This is going places... It must be possible to detect keylogging by close scrutiny of timing between physical keystroke execution and the character's eventual occurrence on the screen. No, that assertion is invalid. ...


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The big problem you're going to run into if you're trying to find a keylogger by analyzing keypress latency is the monitor's refresh rate: most monitors only update 60 times per second. A good keylogger is only going to add a few microseconds of latency, so even before you take other sources of noise (such as scheduler randomness) into account, you're ...


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In theory, you are correct, you can compare hit time and appearance time and determine if it's legit or not. In reality however, you will face so many reasons for this timing to fluctuate that it will be impossible to ohtain a decent detection ratio.



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