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2

Would a password combination of images be stronger for users login regarding keyloggers? Yes, it would be stronger... a little bit. That is not saying much. A keylogger will catch only the keystrokes and not the selected user images, right? If you want to be technical, a keylogger logs keys. In the real world, many "keyloggers" also log things other ...


9

Once the system is infected with malware it is compromised. Anything that is done on that system can be observed so there is no way to allow someone to log in securely from that system just using that system. Period. End of Story. You might come up with some oddball scheme for something the user has to do as part of the login process that the malware doesn'...


26

Nope. Keyloggers can often also do screen-capturing and mouse-coordinate-logging. So the attacker can still see what image the user selects. Another kind of two-factor authentication for which the user needs two devices (e.g. laptop and phone) would be more secure. Another good alternative is a Yubikey. A kind of device which generates a pseudo-random ...


2

Yes, it is most often just a useless "security measure". We need to define the threat model and then if an on screen keyboard provides a proper mitigation. A OSK will protect against two threats: A hardware keylogger A software keylogger that is only looking at the keyboard state (does not attempt to defeat a OSK). One should note the the difference ...


3

If an attacker is aware that an OSK may be used (and that becomes more and more common with touch devices), he can prepare an OSK attack, e.g.: capture screenshots of the OSK and identify keys pressed (e.g. because they have a different color) an his own OSK on top of the existing OSK (similar to clickjacking) add a kernel mode driver to do whatever, e.g. ...


0

When your WiFi network is breached you have to assume that any device on your network is compromised. The best way to stay safe is to have a strong WiFi password and strong password on all your devices as well as updates versions and be aware of any weird activity.


2

If all this is overwhelming to you, get a friend to help you or hire someone. Also, consider filing a lawsuit if you strongly believe this person is spying on you. This is illegal! What can you do Most likely the attacker got into your wireless network because you are using an old router with weak encryption or your chosen password is weak. He could have ...


3

There can be a lot of reasons that the AV did not detect the software: The code is signed by a reputable company (known good) The binary is a known-good in the NSRL The software does not match a malicious signature or attempt to make suspicious network connections For additional confirmation, check the list of AVs at avcomparitives.org and test another ...


0

Working with mouse with on-screen keyboard? There are keyloggers who can capture coordinates of mouse-clicks. Yet, there are also keyloggers who just capture screenshots. So that method ain't really bulletproof. It's called screen-capturing. Copy and paste? Nope. Some (imho, sophisticated) malware can even extract what you've copied from memory. Besides ...


1

My knowledge is out of date, but several years ago I worked at a U.S. agency that wanted to understand how to maximize security for end users using PCs that were not under the agency's control, e.g. for some end user who logs from their home, from their employer, or from the public library. Most popular at that time was Zeus, and although Zeus had a ...



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