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Bitlocker uses AES in CBC mode, Truecrypt and others use AES/Twofish/Serpent/cascades in XTS mode (Wikipedia: Block cipher mode of operation). CBC mode is less secure in that it allows single bit manipulation, for example switching a specific bit of data when attacker can gain physical access to the machine then return it to you. This can open backdoor ...


4

Strictly speaking, no, mutual authentication does not protect against POODLE. Some details may matter, though. The core of the POODLE attack is that there is a way, with SSL 3.0, to alter some records so that the receiving end will not notice the substitution with probability 1/256. With this protocol misfeature, attackers can "try" decryption guesses on a ...


7

It is unknown (except probably to Microsoft and the NSA) whether BitLocker has a back door. You cannot examine the source code to find out, either. (And even if you could, a purposeful weakness might be very difficult to spot, even for an experienced cryptographer.) TrueCrypt's source code is available and has (as of today) been audited. No back doors or ...


0

Your question is somewhat unclear. Does the site already have Open Redirect vulnerability (https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Open_redirect)? If it does you proceed as tim already have said. If it doesn't and you are interested in general methods of getting your malicious code into its pages, then either you hack into the site ("getting shell"), or find some ...


1

Exactly as you are doing. The idea of open redirect vulnerabilities is to use the trust a user has in a specific website (the vulnerable site), and exploit it to get them to visit your website. So you would send this link to a user: example.com/?url=evil.com/sploitCode.php. Because the website they see is example.com, and they trust them, they will click on ...



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