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It sounds like you have plenty of sensitive information on your website! Even if your site contains no sensitive information, though, implementing HTTPS is a sound decision. Insecure HTTP connections are vulnerable to a man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack, allowing an attacker to impersonate your site with ease. Clients have no way to be sure they're actually ...


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First of, HTTPS only protect data while in transit, it does not protect your data afterward. Therefore, you will need to implement security for this data at rest. Designing a fully secure system is a really, really difficult task and evaluating what is an acceptable risk and what isn't is far from trivial. I would really suggest you seek advise from a ...


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I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. If you are actually going to do this, you should ask a lawyer. The EFF might be able to help clarify things without charge. The answer will probably be that it varies from place to place, and depends on what legal authority you mean. Different parts of governments have different kinds of authority (the twilio ...


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In light of the fact that you don't have the private keys (given the way that you've posed the question), it would be impossible for any authority to force you to decrypt information that was encrypted using the accompanying public keys. You can't get blood from a stone. But notwithstanding, authorities in the US have been known to force site operators to ...


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In the United States, generally anyone can subpoena anyone or anything as part of the "discovery" process. It is up to the presiding Judge to decide whether or not this is relevant or allowable. In a civil action, as opposed to a criminal one; some typical protections (e.g. 5th amendment protection against self-incrimination) do not apply. Thus, it is far ...


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Imagine your neighbor came up to you and told you that he was looking at the locks on your house and noticed they were really easy to pick with a simple and cheap pick gun, available on the internet. With such a tool someone could get in your house in 5 minutes. He then said you should upgrade to hard to pick Medeco locks. Would you think your neighbor ...


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To be honest, I find that most people don't / won't care. Unless they are running a business or similar functionality over the network I wouldn't bother explaining the difference between WEP and WPA2 to them, especially since they might not be tech savvy and just get more confused or worried about it. At least they are using SOME security. I have been to ...


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I don't believe there are legal ramifications in advising someone about security, but you may want to approach it cautiously. You'll definitely want to explain in a way that fits the user's ability level as far as tech is concerned, and if they're using WEP they may not be very well versed. They may ask for your help in setting up a stronger encryption as ...


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A quick google search turned up the following: Romania Switzerland Netherlands Norway Iceland


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A new law on information collection and intelligence recently passed in France, and is under review by the supreme court (Conseil Constitutionnel). https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Projet_de_loi_relatif_au_renseignement It gives a large freedom to police and intelligence service to "access" any data located in France. However, it is not clear if the ISP has ...


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I have found a website which list a overview of the key privacy and data protection laws and regulations across 77 different jurisdictions. Of course i haven't read the legislation of any of these countries and i'm not a lawyer so you should pick one of this countries and do a deep search to see if their laws suit your needs. And laws can change at any ...



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