Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In Canadian privacy regulation, public bodies are not able to transfer or store PII of citizens outside of Canadian borders (it should cross border, because data exchanged to US can be monitored). Therefore, none of government or crown organizations in Canada use AWS for any purpose. The restriction is so strict that apparently Microsoft is planning to open ...


0

Set up your own DNS recursive resolver with DNSSEC and set an outgoing firewall policy blocking DNS requests to anything else. ISPs tend to abuse DNS, you don't want to use their servers, even if they are configured correctly.


0

Can exit nodes eavesdrop on communications? Isn't that bad? Yes, the guy running the exit node can read the bytes that come in and out there. Tor anonymizes the origin of your traffic, and it makes sure to encrypt everything inside the Tor network, but it does not magically encrypt all traffic throughout the Internet. Also, JavaScript is enabled ...


0

Appart from the "100% anonymity" from your title, which seem to include government agencies and can therefore never be 100% ensured, as long as the "online communities" are concerned some of them implement special policies regarding Tor's exit nodes IPs. For instance you can check Wikipedia where by default Tor's users are prevented from editing articles to ...


0

If a user has good trade craft and implements good tor hygiene by doing all the things you listed, it would be very hard to UID them..if not impossible. I know one of the most common methods that is emerging is pattern recognition that can analyze things like how a user types and then UID them from that, but that relies on things like javascript so if it is ...


1

ToR and associated products (e.g. Tails) provide a technological capability which will, if used consistently, allow certain actions to be taken online without any easy way to track them back to the person executing them. So it's likely that the weak point in an anonymous browsing setup will be the person operating it. Good Operational Security (OpSec) ...


5

In addition to the answers discussing cloud access, or the good answer from phillip, google docs is going to leave lots of traces in temp files/swap etc where the documents could be easily retrieved. By common practice/configuration virtually all browsers are going to leave temp files behind for every page viewed. In addition to the temp/cache files that ...


3

It's really a bad idea to store sensitive information in the internet, especially in Google products. If you are concerned about FBI I suggest to delete everything and read a lot about how to keep your files safe. If you need thease files in internet for some reason, at least use PGP encryption for the files. Also use encryption for your hard drive with ...


4

Others have commented that if they capture your session cookie they can simply access your documents, and otherwise they can obtain a warrant to get your documents from Google. There is a minor twist to the second point: they need to know your user ID. Without this, they cannot serve a meaningful warrant to Google, and finding some incriminating document ...


33

As pointed out by begueradj, any government agencies can access your cloud-stored files through a subpoena to Google. But your question was what they can do when they have your laptop alone and nothing else. This is not an unlikely scenario. It is the situation you have, for example, when you get arrested by law enforcement and they do not have sufficient ...


52

When you store data on Google Docs, as you may already know, it is not encrypted at all. I read that everything you upload to Google Docs and similar services are not only yours anymore because you agree Google to own them too. This means, at first glance, Google has already access to your files since Google confesses that by itself: When you upload, ...


1

Probably not enough context to make any accurate determinations. But here is a shot at it. What frequently used law does does the Government rely on to search private property? The supreme court is pretty clear on this that they require a warrant. Even with a warrant, there is some discussions that if your data (hard drive, as an example) is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included