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If you are utilizing a cloud service where you cannot control where data is stored, there may be potential legal risks. For example, in some cases US data stored on EU servers may be deemed subject to EU data directive privacy controls and data stored in the US may not meet EU requirements or have sufficient safe harbor. Other odd cases come up in ...


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In most website hostings, the part that is "your website" is very thin, and there is not much to hack except php/asp input sanitization. The bigger, hackable part is not actually yours - it is provider's infrastructure shared among your website and many others. You need to consider this: unless you run the website on your own computer, your friends are not ...


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Is it legal? In most jurisdictions, yes, but read up on local law first. A few answers above highlight jurisdictions where hacking is illegal even when authorized, but for the most part, the kinds of exercises you're talking about are authorized, since the owner of the machine is setting it up this way deliberately and expressly for the purpose of security ...


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You need to be a little more lateral in your thinking. To practice hacking on a web site, you don't need a public web site - in fact, you don't want a public web site because once it is public, you no longer have control over who can try to hack it. I would also suggest, without wanting to be rude, that based on your question, you and your friends are ...


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The answers mention that hacking is legal when authorized. This is not the case everywhere, Germany has since 2007 a wicked law which makes illegal everything related to hacking, legal or not. How much this law makes sense and is enforced and enforceable is another story.


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In a nutshell, regardless of what country you are in, 'Hacking' is defined as unauthorised access to a system. You are not necessarily 'hacking' so much as 'testing a system for vulnerability'


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First of all: No one can answer this question because we don't know what country you are talking about. Even if we would know we are not lawyers and can not answer this. I guess in most countries the legal situation about this would not be clear anyway. It would probably be in a grey area. In reality it does not matter if is legal because your server will ...


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As Mark states, it more or less has to be legal to do this, since it's effectively authorized access, although perhaps by unconventional routes. Also consider the many hacking contests where the prize is the hacked machine (or whatever). Some (if not many) of these contests are not on a private network, but are conducted over the public Internet. Search ...


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To the best of my knowledge, yes, it's legal. Every anti-hacking law I'm aware of refers to unauthorized access, and if you've got permission to hack it, it's not unauthorized, is it? Note that there are some things you'll need to watch out for. Some jurisdictions prohibit the possession of "hacking tools" (akin to prohibiting possession of lockpicks, but ...


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I would have to say that if you have a privacy concern then you should not be using devices which you see as compromised or risky, the onus is on you to do this. Would you do a bank transfer by giving your details to your worst enemy and asking them to do it ? I have had employers which have essentially blocked Internet access off to prevent this The ...


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I think the basic idea here is "unauthorized access." If the school accessed a student's non-school account, there can be a case made for the school accessing that account without authorization. There are a couple things that could negate matters: The account is a school account - the school is authorized because it is their account The network access ...


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It is certainly not illegal to store or display plain text passwords in general. There are some best practices that should be considered. For example, if the website is accessible over the internet then SSL should be used anytime you are displaying a password. Even for internal only sites this is still a good idea. If passwords are being displayed, that ...


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Theres no law regarding passwords. Only law that exists applies to personal details, but a password is not a personal detail. Since the password is often selected by the end user, under EU law this will Count as consent too, so even if someone would enter personal details as their password, it would Count as consent. Depending on what the password protects, ...



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