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9

Entropy is required in the following sense: if a PRNG has only n bits of entropy, then this means that it has (conceptually) only 2n possible internal states, and thus could be broken through brutal enumeration of these 2n states, provided that n is low enough for such a brute force attack to be feasible. Then things become complex, because the "entropy ...


3

If we take a look at the man page for random we get the following: The random number generator gathers environmental noise from device drivers and other sources into an entropy pool. The generator also keeps an estimate of the number of bits of noise in the entropy pool. From this entropy pool random numbers are created. At the bottom we see: ...


2

Is it possible for a virus/worm to attack on your host to attack the guest OS? Yes. Is it likely? No. Malware can do anything you can do, including writing to the virtual disk. The easiest route would be to simply mount the virtual machine drive, and write new malware to it. This is unlikely because it would take specially crafted code to exploit this. ...


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I'd recommend Virtutech's SIMICS software. Note that Virtutech was bought by Intel and assigned to their subsidiary: Wind River. Simics is a SIMULATOR, which has important distinctions from an EMULATOR (like qemu). See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1584617/simulator-or-emulator-what-is-the-difference for specifics on the differences. Simics simulates ...


2

There isn't a document like that because it is highly dependent on its application, its configuration, and its use. Linux has more configuration options which can make it faster and safer (whatever that might mean in your context), but those options also mean that it can be slower and more dangerous. If there was an "official document", then every ...


2

dev/random is not even remotely the same as NIST SP 800-90A DRGB. If you want to claim compliance to NIST SP 800-90A DRGB then hire a test lab to test your DRBG and submit the results to NIST's Cryptographic Algorithm Validation Program (http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/STM/cavp/index.html) and then it will end up on this list: ...


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The cat ~/.ssh/authorized_keys command shows you the authorized_keys file of the currently logged in user. When logged in as root, or using sudo, this will give you the authorized_keys file of the root user. The authorized_keys file, at least on Ubuntu, is usually owned by the user. So the currently logged in user (root or not) can see it. The .ssh ...


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This link gives a pretty good explanation. In particular, this section talks about how to verify packages. In a nutshell when you install packages your system check that they are signed with a known key, using public key crypto. This guarantees that the packages come from a "trusted" source. In your case some packages were signed with an unknown key and you ...


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Cisco and Juniper routers implement GDOI. Also you can look at this implementation: GDOI Reference Implementation Primer, but it's a bit old.


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I initially shared the same goal when I began considering encrypting my PC. Unfortunately, after hours and hours of research, all I learned was that VeraCrypt does not currently support encrypting Linux system drives. Ref: https://veracrypt.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=Supported%20Systems%20for%20System%20Encryption I was also not able to find an ...


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I've recently started to work on USBGuard which implements a USB device whitelist/blacklist with the help of UDev and the Linux kernel USB authorization feature. It's a user-space daemon that listens to UDev events and authorizes or deauthorizes USB devices based on a set of rules written in a custom rule language. I think it makes it much harder for an ...



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