New answers tagged

1

Theoretically, yes, since your password has been sent to Google and is most likely stored somewhere along with billions of other short strings. In practice though, the probability of that password getting out of that database and somehow making its way to an attacker that tries to use it to access your account is several orders of magnitude lower than many ...


4

It's doubtful, but consider the following The connection to Google Search is encrypted. As far as we know, Google Search History has not been compromised. In the event you have Google Search and Web History Enabled, your search history could theoretically be accessed by someone who managed to break into your account. You stated that you didn't press enter; ...


-4

It can't be possible (as far as I know PHP and MySQL). That's because PHP (a language in web development) tells MySQL (database server) to store your input after it's SUBMITTED. And the auto-completion, I don't know much on it or what language is used to make that kind of feature, but I think it just gets what matches more with your string (i.e your ...


1

I think you're asking the wrong question, and will suggest some edits. Your question ("Because of autocomplete, is my password at risk?") implies you have a single password, and worries about the exposure threat from typing it into a search engine. You probably don't need to worry about that, but you do need to worry that one or more of the sites at which ...


3

Even though it was probably encrypted as others have stated, there's a risk that it may be displayed again as a suggested search if you were to type the same first few characters as part of a real Google search. If it was displayed again it may be at risk from shoulder surfers. So I suggest you change your password.


25

I recommend that you change your password. The fact is, that your password has been sent to their servers, even if you didn't press enter. You can test that on your own, open your browser, Ctrl + Shift + I, select network, start typing and monitor traffic. Here is an example, writing the keyword "test", and not pressing enter. Pay attention to the letter ...


69

I highly doubt it. You didn't press enter but Google will sometimes send the information to quickly present your results. This is forced over HTTPS. Your information was likely encrypted and not exposed. According to most sources Google processes on average 3.5 billion searches per day. There is no additional information to prove your query is a password. ...


7

Theoretically, you should change your password, as by typing it into google the password is sent to google. Google does use https however, and I personally wouldn't be too worried about google having my password as a search, but hey, it's not ideal. Realistically, I think you should be fine, but if you want complete security, it can't hurt to change your ...


23

It has been sent (encrypted) to Google. Change your password It has probably been logged somewhere, along with many search terms and other junk people have typed there. While it's unlikely it will be used for anything you care or that endangers your account, why bear the risk? Simply changing it will solve it. PS: I recommend using a browser search bar, ...


1

You should back up all files, not just ones you think look important. Don't back up individual files either. Instead, have your syslog daemon send a copy remotely to your backup server in real time. Most syslog daemons support this, and the good ones even support sending it over an encrypted channel. If that is not supported, you can always set up an ...


0

When onboarding device types in Arcsight, I ask customers to provide specific requirements for the log events they're trying to observe. These requirements should be driven by their infosec policies. For each of the requirements, I require them to be able to generate a sample of the log entry, or while being monitored, to generate the event which would ...


2

This is just Google Chrome checking if your ISP is doing DNS hijacking. It checks if these random hostnames will resolve to some valid IP (i.e. hijacked to serve "helpful information", often with ads in it) or will be reported as unresolveable. Nothing to worry about. For more details see Chromes startup random DNS queries ... or Unusual HEAD requests to ...



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