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1

No. Apple does not support this. Apple's Secure Transport library does not support X.509's nameConstraints. There is a bug in Chromium's bug database about this. And it's been closed as WontFix. Developer Ryan Sleevi had this to say on Aug 25, 2014 (archived here): Chrome defers to the OS cryptographic stack for verification. It's a well-known, ...


0

(This is just a complement to the correct answer from Wim Lewis.) Once you have the pid of your suspect process, here are a few commands to help you analyse what this process might be doing. Let's say you stored this pid in the variable _pid. lsof -p ${_pid} will provide you all the files opened now opensnoop ${_pid} will show you all the files during ...


1

ps l [pid] will list, among other things, the "parent process ID" (PPID) of the process. (If the parent process has exited, though, that information is lost and PPID will be 1.) ps eww [pid] will list its environment variables, which may give a hint where it came from. Are you sure this is malware and not an unexpected behavior of something you're doing on ...


2

It's entirely possible that this has no bearing on your own devices or settings. Let's talk about the way one could go about designing that feature: Consider all connections one or two steps away. From those who have enabled syncing their contacts, consider those with a fuzzily matched name. Factored with some other heuristic scoring, you start seeing ...


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Regarding #1, "Does the FBI/NSA or other government agencies have access to my data or can easily decrypt them?" legality aside, there are several factors to consider. "Easy" is relative. Depending on the charges, and the value of the data that is encrypted, they may have more or less incentive to break the encryption. If it's a list of neighborhood ...


5

The Electronic Frontier Foundation maintains an excellent FAQ on digital rights regarding search and seizure of computing devices. For your specific questions: (I'm going to assume US, because you reference FBI and NSA) 1. Can government agencies break disk encryption? Without a warrant or probable cause, no. With a warrant, if your question is: "Can the ...


1

Talking legally, of course they don't if they don't have court order,technically, i really doubt that, when it comes to decryption, we are basically talking about how strong is the encryption algorithm and if they can crack it. No, even if you are arrested police can search your devices only in limited circumstances , except at borders, they can search it ...


1

I don't know do they? If you're asking the tinfoil hat type of question: Does the FBI/NSA have access to all harddrives on the internet? Then I believe the answer is no. If a court order is handed down for access to your harddrive then you will need to give it to them. If a court order gives them access to your harddrive and your harddrive is encrypted ...


1

In theory: Partitions are really just logical divisions of space. There is no security boundary between partitions at all. Any virus running under your credentials could manipulate files. Even if you can't manipulate the files when you're logged on (through NTFS security permissions), a virus that manages to escalate to Administrator privileges can probably ...


1

I would consider this to be the milk snake of the ransomware world. In that you are right, FBI ransomware is rather a crafted malicious JS code that is more annoying and scaring than penetrating the operating system, and as you can read on the TheSafeMac: …there is no indication that this is actually Mac malware of any kind. It’s simply an ...


4

Boot Camp allows you to make two operating systems coexist on the same hard drive (but in distinct areas, called "partitions"), and to choose which one is started when you power up the machine. However, each OS, once started, sees and can access the whole machine. In particular, Windows, once started, is aware of the existence of both partitions, and can ...


1

According to a blog post on 'Trusted BSD', a framework which OSX implements, a Mandatory Access Control (MAC) approach might work. The post seems to indicate that the system will require users attempting to access the resource (unprivileged and admin alike), to have certain associated security attributes. With this framework, there may be a way to prevent ...



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