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0

Depends on the cable. If it's a cheapo "one-size fits all" charger cable like this, (sold in chain store pharmacies like CVS, Walgreens, etc), it might have fewer wires, (to save on manufacturing costs). If the data wires don't exist, it can't transmit any data. Instructables has a how to for making a two wire cable. Summary, open cable sheath, see ...


6

There's also the possibility that it's not actually an Android phone, but a "USB Killer" of some sort: This is a device which, when connected to the USB port, will send -220 volts down the data / power lines, thereby frying the USB controller and possibly other components of your laptop. This one looks like a flash drive, but it could easily be made to ...


59

Firewire and also Thunderbolt provide direct access to the OS memory, thus bypassing the operating system. See Wikipedia: DMA attack for more details on the possible attacks. USB does not provide this kind of direct access. But it has other problems like the ability to unexpectedly emulate devices like a keyboard, see BadUSB.


15

Yes, but you can mitigate the risk by using a USB condom that does not connect the cables that convey data and communication, but leaves the charging pins live. You would still be exposed to attacks that can take place over the power cables, such as the device supplying a very high voltage or current back to your laptop. Presumably MacBook USB ports have ...


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There would never be a valid reason to use SSH for communication between processes running on the same device, unless that device was used to simulate a network, in which case it would act as multiple virtual devices anyway so technically not be the same device. Use unix domain sockets instead. Note that domain sockets are not the same as the Secure Sockets ...


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Yes. Android devices have the capabality to act as basically any USB device. This opens up gates for all kind of Bad USB attacks like Rubber ducky attack that types in scripts very fast (Almost un-noticable by the user) by acting as a keyboard (HID | Human interface device). Then it could act as a network device and setup MITM These two are ...


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There is always the possibility that someone could have found a vulnerability that could abuse the system at any level. Vulnerabilities have been found continuously on all systems throughout the history of computers, so it is not impossible. That said, the risk seems fairly low.


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This could get dangerous if you have autorun enabled. Malware can get executed automatically this way. "Fortunately" autorun isn't possible in vanilla Mac OS X, so you shouldn't be too worried. (Of course there are many more possibilities to run malicious software too.) The smartphone pretty much acts like an usb stick. So every security risk you get with ...


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RoboKaren, There are many possible answers, but here are what I would consider the "top four". (1) If you absolutely must use OpenConnect and CLI, then maybe the "best" solution would be for you to create a small encrypted disk image in your home folder. You would then manually mount that disk image whenever you needed a VPN session and refer to that in ...


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If you have JAMF Casper Suite, you can utilize the script infrastructure built by many of the following developers and projects: https://github.com/JAMFSupport https://github.com/loceee/OSXCasperScripts https://github.com/rtrouton?tab=repositories If you use a different Enterprise agent suite, such as Munki, LANDesk, Puppet, Chef, Centrify, et al, you ...



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