Hot answers tagged

89

You can put any text strings into a cookie, so in theory you could put some kind of code there. But for code to do any harm something needs to run it. The web browser does not interpret the content of cookies as code and does not try to run it, so cookies should not be dangerous. (If you have heard cookies being referenced in security related discussions, it ...


81

I doubt there is a way to store any information (thus transfer information) on regular headphones. Some more advanced models (such as noise canceling) have some processing ability and firmware, but I don't see it as a viable attack vector.


39

While I would not say "impossible", I can say that you don't need to worry. Headphones do not have any storage that could be used to store malware. Also, they usually do not actively send much data to the phone they are plugged into that could be used. For example, only send sound data if there is a mic, and maybe some simple play/stop/skip/volumeup/down ...


17

It certainly does. gdb will not isolate the process at all and will merely give you some control over it to understand what it does. To do that kind of analysis, you should resort to a fully isolated system such as a VM with no network access. Break points will be respected, but you should always account for human errors which can have drastic ...


13

As far as I can establish, these headphones don't have memory, so they would not be able to store malware. Also, the datastream should only be from the computer or mobile to the headphones. Even if an attacker managed to put malware on the headphones, it would be hard to send the malware to another computer or mobile. If it were a headset (i.e. with a ...


13

Potentially, yes -- but it depends! Quite a number of Android devices (and potentially a lot of others) enable access on a serial UART console on the headphone jack during boot (a nice wrapup also exists on pentestpartners.com). You don't need a lot of electronics (and space requirements) to build a headphone that can (ab)use UART access to do something evil,...


12

If you had two viruses in play, one that infected Linux with a payload to infect Windows, then it could conceptually happen. However, a native Windows virus cannot run in Linux at all. The reason why nothing would happen has to do with something known as the "Application Binary Interface", or "ABI" for short. In Windows, most system calls are performed ...


12

Thanks Alexandar O'Mara for pointing me in the right direction - it was a small tip, but it got me there. I ran nslookup with the domains and got: C:\Users\xxx>nslookup scorecardresearch.com Server: router.asus.com Address: 192.168.56.1 Name: scorecardresearch.com Address: 103.16.230.165 C:\Users\xxx>nslookup sb.scorecardresearch.com Server: ...


10

In addition to Anders' excellent answer, there was a vulnerability in Internet Explorer 5 and 6 which allowed a malicious cookie to be set that could then read or set other sites cookie values. Article here. An information disclosure vulnerability related to the handling of script within cookies that could allow one site to read the cookies of ...


7

In many Ubuntu dual-boot setups it is possible to run code as an unprivileged user which has the ability to write to the Windows partition. Because, if you can do it with the file manager without getting asked for a system password a malware could mount the windows partition too with the same kind of helper. And if the malware setups a file into the ...


7

Something that looks like headphones and plugs into the headphone jack could be evil -- it could fry your audio chip by pushing electric current beyond normal limits. But without extra software already on the device, it can't save data to the hard drive of the device.


7

Malware files by themselves are not special in any way, they're just like any other file albeit with a malicious purpose. So, you can simply delete it as you would any other file. If for some reason you feel that someone (yourself included) might go digging through your computers recycle bin, you can also empty it to prevent accidental retrieval.


7

What risks do you have? Possibly that your computer is now infected with malicious software like a virus or a trojan horse. The following steps should be taken if you didn't already. What to do? There are some steps you can take: First of all, don't click on links that you don't trust or know Use unshortenit.it or urlex.org to check where the ...


6

Cookies can only transfer TEXT values, meaning it cannot harm your computer stand-alone, but it can contain very important informations, that can be used against you if stolen. Read about Session hijacking, and you will understand what specificaly the exploiter can use it for.


6

I think your group is in fact a so-called Super Group. Super Groups work a little differently than normal groups and the one-check/two-check system doesn't apply here. All messages get double checks instantly when received by the server. (That's a feature.) The creator of your original group has clicked the 'upgrade to supergroup' button at some point, ...


5

Yes, it is possible for a malware to infect the Windows partition while your are using Linux - source: it happened to me. This was many years ago when I was starting with Linux. The dualboot system was currently running under Linux, and I wanted to exchange files between two computers using Samba. Since there were some problems with it, I removed all ...


4

No. Viruses can infect any commonly used bootable media. The spread of this type of viruses became thwarted (in addition to better protection mechanisms) because of a change in media usage patterns. Floppy disks in their golden age were used as a medium for live OS (booting and running), software distribution and for data exchange. Nowadays you use: ...


4

Theoretically they can, as Anders already mentioned. The "problem" is that they won't be executed by the browser. However, another software/malware on your computer could. Which would be particularly dangerous, because anti virus programs most likely won't detect the cookie or the executing software on their own when carried out in separate files.


4

Speakers and microphones are essentially the same thing: a vibrating element controlled by an electronics signal. Because of that, you can turn a speaker into a microphone quite easily by messing with the cables. In theory, a modified headset equipped with bluetooth or a data cable (like the upcoming Lightning-connected earpieces might be) could spoof a ...


4

No, you can't give your Android phone malware by using Apple earbuds. Pretty much, earbuds, like any headphones, are just two small speakers each soldered to two wires that complete the circuit between the earphone and the headphone jack. Some headphones have a volume switch, small microphone, playback control (pause/play, stop, rewind, fast forward, etc.) ...


3

The short answer, albeit deceiving without the long answer: Yes, a cookie can carry a virus. Yes, it is possible to get such a virus by merely visiting a website delivering the cookie. In the above paragraph, replace "a cookie" with "any file, data, or anything else," and replace "visiting a website" with "possessing," and the statement still holds true. ...


3

If the Windows partition is mounted, then any user with permission to write to that mount can change any file as they please, without the normal restrictions or permissions that would be enforced when Windows is booted. This could allow a malicious user to replace critical system files in order to infect Windows. That being said, I don't think there is any ...


3

Since browsers and plugins like flash are not bug-free there is a non-zero risk that you can be attacked with malware just by visiting a web site or that your credentials gets stolen. These can be silent attacks (drive-by-downloads, cross-site-scripting, CSRF...) or social attacks (downloads of fake software updates, scareware, fake login,...). You will find ...


3

The cookie itself does not do damage, but it may contain code used by executables. A tactic of some viruses is to store the cookie with some partial code and that code will be alter run by a virus-like application. Example: cookie stores decryption key for an executable that bypasses initial scans due to being well encrypted. Then the .exe is using the key ...


3

It seems surprising because crypto libraries are available on all (major) platforms. But it sounds often simpler than it is. For example accessing the Crypto API on Windows takes a lot of additional code to do it properly. But the amount of malware authors being very familiar with cryptography is rather small. Therefore they tend to focus on functionality ...


3

No, it is not possible because a common jack cable headphone lacks 3 things that are necessary for a malware infection: Storing data Executing code Transferring data This is something we might see coming onto headphones in the future. For example USB-headphones might come with such features which would make a malware infection and propagation possible.


3

The most important thing to consider here is that this type of JavaScript malware does not run in a browser. It runs in a special runtime called NW.js which gives powerful NodeJS API's not found in a browser. While NW.js shares many technologies with the Chromium browser, it is not a browser but a type of native wrapper for making desktop apps, and this ...


3

I assume you are referencing this Wikipedia article for your info. Basically, the malware does not register the domain names, it just generates a list of possible domain names. The attacker registers domain names that are "possible" outputs of the DGA. For example, if the DGA is something like: x = rand(10) domain = "xyz" + x + ".com" contact(...


2

This is an interesting question. Font files are like other media files which might be abused by malware or within exploiting attempts. Detecting malicious blocks in such media files would follow a signature-based approach: You or your antivirus software would be looking for suspicious pattern. I'm not aware of a public compilation of malicious code in font ...


2

I've been writing malware for professional security tests for more than 20 years. Evasion of AV detection is one of the common requirements of our customers. The approach depends on which scanning mechanism shall be evaded. Pattern-based detection is very simple in the AV environment. This is like a regular expression which tries to identify a common part ...



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