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9

The message means that Facebook has received some unusual requests from your computer, like for example a large number of attempts to guess passwords for different accounts or attempts to post spam. So Facebook assumes that you have some kind of malware on your computer and recommends you to install a malware scanner to get rid of it. For more information ...


6

Probably the best low-impact solution is to use multiple disks. OSX supports it already. You could keep a regular disk plugged in, and use the second disk on a weekly basis (keeping it unplugged and in a safe location). If your backup gets compromised you only risk losing a week's worth of work. Also, keep your backups encrypted!


5

There is one flaw in your premise that since those malware ran on windows 10 but not on 98 and hence windows 98 is safe. By that logic, I can say that my shell script cleared the contents of a linux box but not windows and hence windows is more secure. Edit: Modern operating systems are the primary targets for attackers as most of the users use them. If the ...


4

You need to make one adjustment to your conclusion: So, I see Windows 10 gets more infected than Windows 98 Should be So, I see Windows 10 gets more infected than Windows 98 by the programs I tried You cannot make general comments about Windows based on the small sample set of software and malware you tried, especially since you indicate that ...


4

An increasingly common attack is to use your Google Play Store credentials to force apps onto the device via the web page for the app. If you are seeing apps install automatically this is the likely source. In any event if you got malware on your phone, you really need to change your Google credentials and reset any 2fa tokens or app-specific passwords ...


3

1/3/4/7-Access to the Internet? Not a good idea as depending on what it does, your VM could release it "into the wild". Running it in a VM should be perfectly fine if it is not connected to the internet. This answer from The Bear will go into a lot more detail regarding the malware escaping a VM. Here 2-Formatting should be fine for 99% of malware. Some can ...


3

Uploading a virus won't infect something. Interpreting the virus in the interpreter the virus was meant to exploit will (i.e. Acrobat opening a PDF; the OS launching an x86_64 binary; etc). This is something to think about when you evaluate your threat model. The importance of extensions File extensions are only hints to handling instructions. Only Windows ...


3

My question is has the malware installed proxy server on my pc? Based on your description this is very likely. How the malware has done this? Use of proxy is only a registry setting or similar (i.e. browser profile) setting and can be changed by a process (no manual interaction required). How to resolve this issue? Unless you have ...


3

I'm afraid wiping the machine, changing all your passwords from another good machine, doing a fresh install from known good install media, and restoring the data (carefully) from backups really is the only solution guaranteed to clean your machine. In the trade we call this "nuke it from orbit", and the reason it is the only way to be sure is that you ...


2

From what sources can an Android device be infected with malware? The most common problem is to install apps from outside the google play store, i.e. third party app stores or just by downloading an APK. Often these apps claim to be hacked versions of commercial apps, the next version of a popular game or similar. Installation of such apps requires ...


2

You should NOT. First, you don't know if the file is trustable, you got it from some "source". It is never advisable to install APKs from untrustworthy sources, especially on your primary device. Second, it contains a known vulnerability. Third, it is an offline game, and it requires full internet connection(it may be because of ads, but you never know ...


2

Drive-by downloads are a real threat. These enable a website to exploit a 0-day vulnerability in your browswer to execute malicious code on your system. Note that sometimes websites are hacked to behave maliciously without the website's owners being malicious. While browser manufacturers work to fix security problems quickly, the 1534 publicly announced ...


2

Your 1) Can I test malware in VirtualBox with access to the Internet within the VM without harming my host computer or any of the other computers on my network? You wouldn't want to. Suppose the malware you are analyzing is deisgned to immediately target say a bank or government machine. You could set yourself up for huge liabilities. On the one side of the ...


1

The problem you will actually have, when using a VM, is that most malware will refuse to open its payload so you won't get a lot of research done. Researchers using VMs to dissect malware are all too common, and most malware nowadays actively prevents it by looking for clues that it's running in a VM, and staying dormant if it finds them. Keep that in mind ...


1

Another reasonably useful dataset that i've come across is: AndroMalShare - http://sanddroid.xjtu.edu.cn:8080/ (The domain name has changed at some point but can be found also at http://202.117.54.231:8080/#home ... and if not, the project seems to go as "AndroMalShare Project" ... so just Google that)


1

I had this same issue about 2-3 weeks ago, with the same site coming up after running several scans with Roguekiller. Prior to that the browsers would lock up or work very intermittently, (Firefox, Chrome, Edge, IE , Opera, ect.) Using a web browser in a game, running a VM or Tor worked, but even Tor would lock up after an hour. This was on Win 10 64bit, ...



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