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A good answer has already been given by sasha, but I want to look at this from another angle; specifically, what memcpy actually does (in terms of what code gets executed). Allowing for the possibility of minor bugs in this quick-and-dirty implementation, a trivial implementation of a function with the signature void memcpy(void* target, void* source, ...


12

Assuming buf's size is either controlled by n or larger than 16, the attacker could make n any number he wanted and use that to read an arbitrary amount of memory. memcpy and C in general do not throw exceptions or prevent this from happening. So long as you don't violate any sort of page protections or hit an invalid address, memcpy would continue ...


5

tl;dr: Virtual machine RAM is reasonably private, given your stated assumptions. I'm not an expert on virtual machine security (real experts, please come correct any errors in this post), but I found this question interesting enough to do some Googling. Here's what I found. From a NIST publication titled Security Recommendations for Hypervisor Deployment: ...



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